Speaker accuracy. What is it and do you really want it? - Page 2 - AVS Forum
Forum Jump: 
Reply
 
Thread Tools
post #31 of 35 Old 04-18-2012, 12:23 PM
Advanced Member
 
jmichaelf's Avatar
 
Join Date: Aug 2005
Posts: 988
Mentioned: 0 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 0 Post(s)
Liked: 13
It just makes sense for a system to output the source signal as it was input. If you don't like the sound, change the signal. I fail to see how buying a speaker built to be inaccurate is a good idea.
jmichaelf is offline  
Sponsored Links
Advertisement
 
post #32 of 35 Old 04-18-2012, 12:33 PM
AVS Addicted Member
 
Nuance's Avatar
 
Join Date: Jan 2006
Location: Wisconsin
Posts: 11,583
Mentioned: 0 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 3 Post(s)
Liked: 58
Quote:
Originally Posted by jmichaelf View Post

It just makes sense for a system to output the source signal as it was input. If you don't like the sound, change the signal. I fail to see how buying a speaker built to be inaccurate is a good idea.

Word.


To view links or images in signatures your post count must be 0 or greater. You currently have 0 posts.


To view links or images in signatures your post count must be 0 or greater. You currently have 0 posts.

 

 

No matter what measurements tell us, a loudspeaker isn’t good until it
sounds good. - Dr. Floyd Toole
Nuance is offline  
post #33 of 35 Old 04-18-2012, 12:35 PM
AVS Special Member
 
Nethawk's Avatar
 
Join Date: Sep 2001
Posts: 2,513
Mentioned: 0 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 0 Post(s)
Liked: 115
Quote:
Originally Posted by syd123 View Post

Speaker accuracy. What is it and do you really want it?

It seems like one of the worst insults to be made about a particular speaker or brand (and it's been said about nearly all of them) is that it is "too bright". Often, the person mentions how listening to the speaker for extended periods became fatiguing and/or headache inducing. ..This got me wondering. What is accuracy and do people really want it in a speaker? I do, but I'm not sure most do.

Great thread! I've avoided lately anything but the conversations I've subscribed to, I don't really need the negativity that seems to be on the increase...

I'm not sure why this would be an insult. Some are particularly sensitive of bright tweeters, myself included. This is obviously not the case for everyone, as many of those speakers I consider too bright are very popular.

I am also not sure who would be insulted? The manufacturer? Other owners? Does a speaker itself have a soul? For all of the above, I don't particularly care, it's my money being spent, my ears that are being pleased.

Lots of very good definitions here, no need to rehash that which has been stated.

Quote:
Originally Posted by Saturn94 View Post

For me accuracy would mean the speakers are just putting out what's on recording without alteration. I agree there's nothing wrong with tweeking the sound to your liking.

Quote:
Originally Posted by commsysman View Post

Speaker accuracy is freedom from distortion; period; the ability to precisely reproduce the input to the speaker.

Quote:
Originally Posted by Nuance View Post

The results of this test show that an overwhelming majority of all listeners preferred the flatter measuring speakers. The notion that we all hear differently is flawed, or in the end it doesn't have an effect on what we like in loudspeaker reproduction. In general we're all striving for "accuracy," whether it is to the live event or what's on the recording.

Start with an "accurate" speaker, then resolve room issues and finally tweak the sound to your hearts content. After all, the only thing that matters that is you are happy with your sound.

Quote:
Originally Posted by BobL View Post

Speaker designers make all type of design choices when building a speaker. You can certainly build a speaker to compensate for a room problem. I'd rather have an accurate speaker and use EQ to flavor to taste if needed as a speaker designed for a given room will only work well in similar rooms. Cost can often be an issue on design tradeoffs, and sometimes marketing has a role in the design as well:-)

We've all been to B&M's and showrooms listening to speakers. While I prefer to be left alone with an A/B switch, we must succomb to salesperson jargon as they attempt to make a sale, those pitches inevitably point to specific differences (whether true or not). IMO these are excuses for inaccuracy. Necessary of course but it's the last thing I want to hear from either human or speaker.

Thanks again for the topic!

Nethawk is offline  
post #34 of 35 Old 04-18-2012, 12:40 PM
Advanced Member
 
jmichaelf's Avatar
 
Join Date: Aug 2005
Posts: 988
Mentioned: 0 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 0 Post(s)
Liked: 13
Quote:
Originally Posted by BobL View Post

Measurements for speakers should have polar plots and/or on and off axis response in both vertical and horizontal directions. Power response plots would be nice too.

To get a good idea of how a speaker is going to sound in a room you need to know how it radiates its sound. This will help with placements and a room treatment design based off this information. Knowing how linear it is at how it responds at different levels. Every speaker has limits and knowing where those occur is very helpful.

Speaker designers make all type of design choices when building a speaker. You can certainly build a speaker to compensate for a room problem. I'd rather have an accurate speaker and use EQ to flavor to taste if needed as a speaker designed for a given room will only work well in similar rooms. Cost can often be an issue on design tradeoffs, and sometimes marketing has a role in the design as well:-)

Some examples of advanced measurements, not just numbers on a spec sheet:

http://www.gedlee.com/abbey.htm

http://www.jblpro.com/catalog/suppor...pe=3&docid=569

http://www.neumann-kh-line.com/neuma...monitors_O410#
jmichaelf is offline  
post #35 of 35 Old 04-18-2012, 01:40 PM
 
BobL's Avatar
 
Join Date: Nov 2001
Posts: 3,797
Mentioned: 0 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 0 Post(s)
Liked: 53
Good pro speakers will be +/- 1db and usually a fraction of a db from 100hz-10khz, as you get more to the frequency extremes is typically where more deviation happens. Many consumer manufacturer's which state +/- 3 db often don't even come close to that. Look at the measurements from some of the magazines. Even if they use averaging over an off axis window they are still significantly greater than that. If we could get honest +/- 3db that would be awesome.
BobL is offline  
Reply Speakers

User Tag List

Thread Tools
Show Printable Version Show Printable Version
Email this Page Email this Page


Forum Jump: 

Posting Rules  
You may not post new threads
You may not post replies
You may not post attachments
You may not edit your posts

BB code is On
Smilies are On
[IMG] code is On
HTML code is Off
Trackbacks are Off
Pingbacks are Off
Refbacks are Off