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post #1 of 35 Old 06-07-2012, 07:22 AM - Thread Starter
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Hi,

My front speakers are the Klipsch RF62, Center RC62 et Surround RS42 and I have de SW-115 subwoofer.

I set all the speakers at Small.

it it better to set at 80hz or 60hz? I read so different story about this...
my subwoofer is set to 120hz

thank you!!
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post #2 of 35 Old 06-07-2012, 08:40 AM
 
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80hz. Don't set x-over based off of speaker capability unless they aren't capable and need a higher x-over like a bose cube. It should be based off the acoustics of the room and 80-100hz is typical in most rooms.
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post #3 of 35 Old 06-07-2012, 10:02 AM
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The crossover on the sub should be set to bypass, off, or maximum frequency so it does not intefere with the bass management of the AVR.
The more work the sub does the less work the AVR and speakers have to do, possibly resulting in better dynamics of the entire system.
As you have probably read the higher the crossover frequency the easier it is to localize the sub location, 80Hz is still good in this regard but is getting close to the limit.
For whatever its worth 80Hz is the THX recommended crossover setting.
i use it and am very satisifed with the way my system sounds.
If the sub is correctly level matched with the speakers the transition from the speakers to the sub should not be detectable by ear.
It is easy to level match the sub, just set the subwoofer's volume control to ~1/4 volume and run the most basic auto cal on the AVR.
Check the subwoofer channel trim setting in the AVR, the closer it is to zero the better.
If it is more than +/-3dB from zero adjust the volume on the subwoofer and run the auto cal again.
Repeat until the AVR sets the subwoofer channel trim to 0 +/-3dB.
Once you have the volume level on the sub dialed in do not change it on the subwoofer, if you want the sub to be louder adjust the channel trim in the AVR.
Hope this is helpful.

Regards,
Charlie

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post #4 of 35 Old 06-07-2012, 10:22 AM
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I think you should go as high as you can with the crossover as long as you can't locate the sub. I like 100 hz and can even use as high as 150 with my placement in my room without any localizing of the subs. It depends on how much you like your subs, I love how mine sound and I like exaggerated punchy bass and that's what I get with 100 hz and running the subs hot. Some say anything higher than 80hz sounds boomy but my subs do not sound the least bit boomy.
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post #5 of 35 Old 06-07-2012, 02:00 PM
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Theres really no wrong way, experiment with your settings and set if where you like it. I keep my mains and center at 60hrz and my subwoofer set at 80hrz. It add alittle extra midbass and helps with the subwoofer null around 65ish-75ish.
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post #6 of 35 Old 06-08-2012, 03:52 AM
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I prefer 60hz on my system.
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post #7 of 35 Old 06-08-2012, 06:38 AM
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With the subwoofer set to 120 Hz and the main speakers set to 60 or 80, you will have too much overlap in their operation, and you will not be using your front speakers to full effect.

What is it about the RF-62 that makes you think they are "small"...duhhhh??? They are rated to go down below 40 Hz!

The main speakers should be set to be used as low as they will go, full-range, and the subwoofer should only be used below 40 HZ. where they do not go.

The subwoofer is MONAURAL, and is only to fill in at the very lowest frequencies, where your main speakers cannot go.

Try it and you will see how much better your system sounds. The way you have it now makes no sense at all.
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post #8 of 35 Old 06-08-2012, 09:19 AM
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Quote:
Originally Posted by commsysman View Post

The main speakers should be set to be used as low as they will go, full-range, and the subwoofer should only be used below 40 HZ. where they do not go.
.

Yes, but what if the subwoofer is more capable at the lower end of the speakers rated frequency range? My speaker are rated to 72 but I guarantee that my subs have more output and can handle huge dynamic swings better under 100 hz. I can't imagine how big and impressive a pair of speakers would have to be to get me to set the crossover at 40hz.
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post #9 of 35 Old 06-08-2012, 10:08 AM
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Setting the subwoofer's internal crossover to 120Hz has basically the same effect as turning it off i.e. the receiver doesn't "see" it. So when the receiver's speaker management system is set to XXHz xover point, its xover will have little if any negative interactions with the sub's xover. Though if the sub is equipped with a dedicated LFE input - which in my experience means the internal xover is completely bypassed, a good thing - I would recommend using that input so you will avoid any possibility of the two xover systems fighting smile.gif with each other.

That being said.............after messing around with my system for nearly two years, after reading up on surround music production techniques on pro audio sites and discussion forums, I finally configured my own system using the "large" setting eek.gif all the way around (I mean, why would a mixing engineer place low/powerful bass in anything but the LFE channel?). Sounds fine to me! Plus I don't need to worry about any xover issues, especially if the studio used bass management of their own during the recording of a 5.1 soundtrack. Remember though, all my speakers are much larger than what is considered politically-correct these days so they can handle just about any bass I expect to be in the L/C/R/SR/SL channels.

Configuration-wise I totally realize I'm going against conventional wisdom here, but again, to my ears it sounds fine. Plus, I don't listen at "reference level" and so don't worry about my receiver running out of power.



* Advent Laureates in front (towers with dual acoustic-suspension 6.5" woofers), Infinity Beta C360 center ( dual 6.5" woofers also - it's huge!), Advent Babys in back (single acoustic-suspension 6.5" woofers); yea the Beta doesn't exactly match the Advents sound-wise, but I got a great deal on it so couldn't pass it up
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post #10 of 35 Old 06-08-2012, 12:14 PM
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You will have to see what you like best. Some of the posts get a bit confusing because people are posting what works for there set up and room not what is a good starting point for you. What AVR are you using?

In general you are on the right track. If by 120 cross over for the sub you mean in the avr you have set the LFE cross over to 120 that is correct. Everything in the .1 (in a 5.1 or 7.1) mix will be sent to the sub. For movies I would still set the mains to small and cross over of 80 and then test at 60. My speakers can handle much deeper but these frequencies are better suited to the sub for movies. I like base so by doing this and running the sub a few db's hot I get a boost in these frequencies. For music though I would go much lower on the cross over or just use you towers in full range without a sub. In music I like accuracy of reproduction.
Quote:
Originally Posted by vampat View Post

Hi,
My front speakers are the Klipsch RF62, Center RC62 et Surround RS42 and I have de SW-115 subwoofer.
I set all the speakers at Small.
it it better to set at 80hz or 60hz? I read so different story about this...
my subwoofer is set to 120hz
thank you!!

My review comparisons of Energy RC-70s to Veritas V6.3 http://www.avsforum.com/avs-vb/showt...8#post21199418
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post #11 of 35 Old 06-08-2012, 12:52 PM
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FYI: I changed my post above - I added "internal" to the first sentence - to make sure the OP knew I was referring to the subwoofer's own built-in xover.
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post #12 of 35 Old 06-09-2012, 03:26 PM
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Quote:
Originally Posted by carp View Post

Yes, but what if the subwoofer is more capable at the lower end of the speakers rated frequency range? My speaker are rated to 72 but I guarantee that my subs have more output and can handle huge dynamic swings better under 100 hz. I can't imagine how big and impressive a pair of speakers would have to be to get me to set the crossover at 40hz.

But by having a higher crossover, you are taking signal away from its intended 2 channel L or R output and turning it into mono. I have noticed that when increasing the crossover point, bass becomes more centred in the soundstage. Reducing crossover gives me a more dynamic soundstage with bass appearing to come more from the sides of the soundstage. After all, a system of small satellite speakers crossed over to subs at 120hz is going to sound different than a system of more full range speakers crossed over to subs at 40hz. The larger speaker system will have a more dynamic soundstage. Although I am more talking about for music... maybe for watching a Batman and Robin movie it wouldn't matter as much.

I have 2-way monitors capable of playing down to 55hz so crossover to subs at 60hz. Crossing over those same speakers at 80hz doesn't sound as good to me.
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post #13 of 35 Old 06-09-2012, 07:47 PM
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100 crossover seems to work best for me, I've a bit of an odd setup.

I have a really weird set of speakers and amps I've built up over time and I guess it's not going to fit in anyone scheme more or less, I run a second amp off my main 5.1 amp with a y-splitter to two old 200 Watt Kenwood KL777-z's I bought when I was in the Marines back in about 1982 just as sub-woolers only, those things still sound about as good as the day I bought them believe it or not smile.gif

I have one just to the left of the main speakers in the front of the room and the other facing backfiring behind the couch in here facing into the entry room of the house it's almost like a small sound chamber in it's own right for the second sub.

If you've never watched the documentary "It Might Get Loud" it's interesting what you can do with acoustics, like some of the things Robert Plant pointed out when they used a house to get certain effects while they were taping ZOSO I think it was, a lot of things you can achieve just buy what you do with a room even.

Then I have done weird things to my Olevia 747i speakers and use them for the center channel and a couple of old JVC 10" woofer and modified mid and tweeters I rebuilt with some radio shack speakers years ago as the woofers were so good I couldn't see dumping them. Tied a couple of old Sony 75 watt rear speakers for the left and right channels so it's kinda a fake 7.1 system. The 747i sits on top of the JVC's so it's kind of a center channel left/right stack with the Sony's tied to the left and right outbaord in the middle of the room.

Have a couple old KLM 970a's as rear channel speakers, and it really has amazed me over time how good those little buggers perform for what they cost.

Granted it's not anything like a standard setup, but you'd be surprised how it sounds, about anyone who comes over and hangs out a bit says it sounds like they are sitting in the theater or at a concert, so I guess mission accomplished smile.gif

And yeah I use the large setting on all of them myself, even the little 970a's and it seems to work better for me at any rate.

I used to run them at 60 or 80 but I guess it depends on what you have and your own room, I've been leaving them around 100 all the time.
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post #14 of 35 Old 06-09-2012, 08:03 PM
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Quote:
Originally Posted by MongGrel View Post

100 crossover seems to work best for me, I've a bit of an odd setup.
I have a really weird set of speakers and amps I've built up over time and I guess it's not going to fit in anyone scheme more or less, I run a second amp off my main 5.1 amp with a y-splitter to two old 200 Watt Kenwood KL777-z's I bought when I was in the Marines back in about 1982 just as sub-woolers only, those things still sound about as good as the day I bought them believe it or not smile.gif
I have one just to the left of the main speakers in the front of the room and the other facing backfiring behind the couch in here.
Then I have done weird things to my Olevia 747i speakers and use them for the center channel and a couple of old JVC 10" woofer and modified mid and tweeters I rebuilt with some radio shack speakers years ago as the woofers were so good I couldn't see dumping them. Tied a couple of old Sony 75 watt rear speakers for the left and right channels so it's kinda a fake 7.1 system. The 747i sits on top of the JVC's so it's kind of a center channel left/right stack with the Sony's tied to the left and right outbaord in the middle of the room.
Have a couple old KLM 970a's as rear channel speakers, and it really has amazed me over time how good those little buggers perform for what they cost.
Granted it's not anything like a standard setup, but you'd be surprised how it sounds, about anyone who comes over and hangs out a bit says it sounds like they are sitting in the theater or at a concert, so I guess mission accomplished smile.gif
And yeah I use the large setting on all of them myself, even the little 970a's and it seems to work better for me at any rate.
I used to run them at 60 or 80 but I guess it depends on what you have and your own room, I've been leaving them around 100 all the time.

Rahh
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No subwoofer I've heard has been able to produce the bass I've experienced in the Corps!

Must..stop...buying...every bluray release...
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post #15 of 35 Old 06-10-2012, 08:43 AM
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Quote:
Originally Posted by commsysman View Post

With the subwoofer set to 120 Hz and the main speakers set to 60 or 80, you will have too much overlap in their operation, and you will not be using your front speakers to full effect.
What is it about the RF-62 that makes you think they are "small"...duhhhh??? They are rated to go down below 40 Hz!
The main speakers should be set to be used as low as they will go, full-range, and the subwoofer should only be used below 40 HZ. where they do not go.
The subwoofer is MONAURAL, and is only to fill in at the very lowest frequencies, where your main speakers cannot go.
Try it and you will see how much better your system sounds. The way you have it now makes no sense at all.

Subwoofer set to 120 and main speakers set to 60 or 80 will result in the subwoofer's built in crossover not interfering with the AVR bass management, this is a good thing.
Setting a speaker to "small" in the AVR allows the AVR to use bass management on that speaker, using bass management with RF-62's is a good thing.
You are incorrect, the crossover to the main speakers should hardly ever be set to their lowest rated frequency of the speaker.
A subwoofer is mono, and bass is mostly non-directional so combining all the bass below the crossover frequency to a single speaker specifically designed to produce bass is a good thing to do.
The one thing I agree with in your post is everyone should experiment to see what they like.
The way the OP has it now makes perfect sense, the OP just wanted opinions between 60 and 80 Hz crossover.
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Regards,
Charlie

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post #16 of 35 Old 06-10-2012, 07:43 PM
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Quote:
Originally Posted by vampat View Post

Hi,
My front speakers are the Klipsch RF62, Center RC62 et Surround RS42 and I have de SW-115 subwoofer.
I set all the speakers at Small.
it it better to set at 80hz or 60hz? I read so different story about this...
my subwoofer is set to 120hz
thank you!!

Chashint gave you good advice and I would think in your setup either would work. Fwiw, I would try both for a week and if you don't notice a difference set it to 80 Hz and be done with it. Good Luck.
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post #17 of 35 Old 06-10-2012, 08:00 PM
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I would go with what auto setup picks for each speaker. I found thats what works best for my HT. If you find that changing the xover higher helps, than go with it. I found that not to be the case..
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post #18 of 35 Old 06-11-2012, 12:38 AM
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Ok,

So if my main front speakers (left and right) have a frequency range of 40Hz - 20kHz

What should my crossover be set to confused.gif

40 confused.gif
50 confused.gif
60 confused.gif

What if my main front speakers (left and right) had a frequency range of 35Hz - 20kHz confused.gif
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post #19 of 35 Old 06-11-2012, 05:11 AM
 
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A crossover is not a cut off point. So a crossover set to 40hz will send frequencies to 20hz and lower to the speaker. Whenever you push a speaker beyond its frequency limit you increase distortion and limit its output. Plus most speakers frequency rating is at -3db and not flat. So the speaker is already starting to reach its limit. This reason alone should be reason enough not to set your crossover to your speakers low frequency limit. Let your subs do the low frequency work and you will get cleaner and louder output from your speaker.

Another reason is room acoustics, but this requires measurements. The best placement for low frequencies is not the best placement for higher frequencies. This is why the Sub/ speaker combo works best compared to full range speakers, even if you have one of the rare speakers truly capable of full range. You can solve some room mode problems by moving your crossover 5 or 10hz. Most rooms this will fall somewhere between 80-100 hz.

To get the best out of your system the speakers and sub have to be well integrated. If you are localizing your subs it is most likely from other resonances and not localizing the sub frequencies themselves. Many not well designed subs will have resonances at higher harmonics that make them localizeable. Resonances can also come from other parts of your room that will make the sub localizeable.

If I were to give any advice on setting a crossover without measurement it would be to double your -3db point of your speakers. This would be a very safe bet without knowing the curve of how your speakers handle low frequencies. So a speaker rated to -3d at 40hz, an 80hz crossover should work fine.

Hope this helps.
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post #20 of 35 Old 06-11-2012, 05:46 AM
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Quote:
Originally Posted by HomeTheaterGuy74 View Post

Ok,
So if my main front speakers (left and right) have a frequency range of 40Hz - 20kHz
What should my crossover be set to confused.gif
40 confused.gif
50 confused.gif
60 confused.gif
What if my main front speakers (left and right) had a frequency range of 35Hz - 20kHz confused.gif

For most setups a capable subwoofer in close to a preferable spot should be able to make anything under 80 Hz not seem localized...With that fact in mind, you need to ask yourself can your speakers, coupled with your amp power, go lower without degrading sound quality (especially at louder volumes)...If not, then set it to 80 Hz because lower than this will start taxing the amps in your avr....With all of this in mind and if you have capable speakers with sufficient current to drive them it can be beneficial to lower the crossover but at some point it should becoming moot.
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post #21 of 35 Old 06-11-2012, 06:03 AM
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A rating of 40 Hz on the main speaker usually means they are down -3db at that frequency; they probably START to roll off at about 45 or 50 Hz; -3db means half-power.

I would try 50 Hz for the upper limit setting on the subwoofer; that will probably work best. You could also try 60 and see which sounds best.

I would not limit the main speakers in any way; let their natural low-frequency rolloff be their only limitation.





Quote:
Originally Posted by Zen Traveler View Post

For most setups a capable subwoofer in close to a preferable spot should be able to make anything under 80 Hz not seem localized...With that fact in mind, you need to ask yourself can your speakers, coupled with your amp power, go lower without degrading sound quality (especially at louder volumes)...If not, then set it to 80 Hz because lower than this will start taxing the amps in your avr....With all of this in mind and if you have capable speakers with sufficient current to drive them it can be beneficial to lower the crossover but at some point it should becoming moot.
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post #22 of 35 Old 06-11-2012, 06:15 AM
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Quote:
Originally Posted by commsysman View Post

..I would not limit the main speakers in any way; let their natural low-frequency rolloff be their only limitation.

I have basically an all Tower 7.1 (using two subs) Home Theater with all of my speakers lower end at/near 40 Hz, but given they have a jagged Frequency Response Curve with dips below 3 Ohms, if I set my crossover that low it would REALLY task my AVR for multichannel music yet my subs wouldn't get much of a workout.
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post #23 of 35 Old 06-11-2012, 08:36 AM
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Quote:
Originally Posted by BobL View Post

A crossover is not a cut off point. So a crossover set to 40hz will send frequencies to 20hz and lower to the speaker.

Huh confused.gif

Quote:
So a speaker rated to -3d at 40hz, an 80hz crossover should work fine.

So what is the point of buying a full-range tower speaker then confused.gif
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post #25 of 35 Old 06-11-2012, 12:07 PM
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Quote:
Originally Posted by BobL View Post

A crossover is not a cut off point. So a crossover set to 40hz will send frequencies to 20hz and lower to the speaker.
I think this needs some clarification for audio newbies. Yes, a xover is not a brickwall device and instead it works on a decreasing-output basis as it encounters frequencies further away from the xover point*, but I think the way this statement is written will make most newbies think frequencies below that 40Hz cutoff setting will be basically just as loud as 40Hz, which is NOT the case.

And: no competent mixing engineer is going to place frequencies below 20Hz into the L/C/R/SR/SL channels. That's what the LFE channel is for. As far as below 40Hz, I highly doubt it but have been considering asking publicly if any members here have done any tests on various soundtracks to find out what IS contained in those satellite channels in the typical multichannel movie soundtrack.
Quote:
Whenever you push a speaker beyond its frequency limit you increase distortion and limit its output. Plus most speakers frequency rating is at -3db and not flat. So the speaker is already starting to reach its limit. This reason alone should be reason enough not to set your crossover to your speakers low frequency limit. Let your subs do the low frequency work and you will get cleaner and louder output from your speaker.
I agree with all this for the most part. But the thing is, since I'm not really an audiophile, I am not bothered by a (potential) increase in inaudible distortion, plus I don't listen at reference level so am not concerned about my receiver being overtaxed in the room it's being used in. With surround music, which many times DOES include low bass - not sub-bass though - in all the sat channels**, it can power my relatively inefficient Advents in my little mancave to stupidly high volume levels w/no audible distortion, levels I never listen at anyway.
Quote:
The best placement for low frequencies is not the best placement for higher frequencies.
True. But if one is not into achieving 100% Audio Perfection i.e. an audio slob biggrin.gif (I'm in that group!), they can place speakers in locations that enable great imaging and the bass might only suffer a little bit.

As I said in another post, personally I like the idea of not having a bunch of active electronic filters i.e. crossovers in the signal path with all their various cutoff slopes possibly doing flaky things with the speaker's own natural cut-off slopes, not to mention the definitely unwanted interaction of my receiver's crossovers interacting badly with a multichannel recording's own set of crossovers that were possibly applied back at the studio (last time I did in-depth research on this, there were still no accepted standards concerning this production issue).

Lastly, to repeat what others have said: I just do what sounds best to me. And using the "large" setting for all MY speakers sounds good to my ears. And, I find it very interesting that pretty much all automatic speaker configuration systems set so many peoples' satellite channels to "large".




* this is written something like this on a receiver's spec charts ----> "cut-off slope: 18dB per octave" FYI: 12dB per octave is extremely common for many speakers' tweeters and midranges, 18dB is relatively common but anything higher is usually avoided because of undesirable sonic effects due to all the numerous components needed to produce such a sharp slope (lots of resistors, capacitors and especially inductors with their many feet of coiled wire). But for an active xover, such as that used in a receiver's speaker management system, this is not a problem because the components only work with tiny amounts of power vs. what a speaker has to deal with, and extremely sharp cutoff slopes are easily generated which won't cause audible problems.


** for example (all are dvd-audios): Beach Boys "Pet Sounds", Medeski, Martin & Wood "Uninvisible", Linkin Park "Reanimation"
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post #26 of 35 Old 06-11-2012, 12:26 PM
 
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A crossover gradually slopes the frequencies. An 80hz crossover for example will still output frequencies below 80hz to the speakers just at a reduced volume. There are different type of slopes (butterworth, bessel, linkwitz-riley, etc.), different order of slopes which determine how much they decrease per octave. On higher end processors these parameters can all be adjusted to get better integration between the speakers and subs. To keep it simple let's use an 80hz crossover with a 12db per octave slope. An octave is a halving or doubling of the frequency. So if we are playing tones to the speakers at 100db level. At 80hz the speakers would be outputting 100db. At 40hz the speakers would output 12db less and be at 88db, at 20hz it would be 76db. If you were to use a steeper slope like 24db per octave then 40hz would be 76db and 20hz would be 52db. 24db per octave is a common crossover for subwoofer.

No one said towers aren't good, they will typically output more in the lower frequencies than a bookshelf and that can be advantage even when used with a sub depending on the volume levels desired. They are not recommended to run full range for reasons described above. Another reason is room modes. If you use them full range then it is like having 3 different subs in the room and you will get different bass response depending where they are placed, Bass coming from each will excite the room modes differently depending which speaker it is coming out from, this is why it is recommended to use the crossover and have most of the bass coming from the subs.

Another area to use full range speakers is in large rooms where room modes no longer dominate the bass response. Although acousticians debate what dimensions constitute a large room, i would say minimally it is a room that is at least 50' x 50'.

Maybe this will help understand crossovers. Crossovers perform the same function whether between a subwoofer and speakers or between the individual drivers of the speakers.
http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Audio_crossover
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post #27 of 35 Old 06-11-2012, 12:29 PM
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FYI for owners of truly small speakers, for example something that uses a single 4" woofer: this is definitely a time when I would set the receiver to "small". And in my experience DON'T use 80Hz as the xover point. There are sounds at and above that frequency that can still contain very powerful sonic elements and IMO a woofer that small will be quickly overwhelmed at anything but low volume settings, leading to audible distortion and very possibly physical damage at high volume settings. Not to mention the fact that a small speaker like this usually cannot produce enough output around that frequency which could lead to a broad dip in the overall system's response around 80Hz, resulting - to my ears anyway - a rather thin and weak sound, especially when playing many types of music (check this interactive chart to see what I mean).

Speaking of music: my own system is geared for that, and movie soundtracks are second on my priority list, so keep that in mind as you read my posts.
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post #28 of 35 Old 06-11-2012, 12:39 PM
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Hi:

I don't understand everything you said, but I do "get the idea". biggrin.gif

I guess my question was -

Why would I want to pay $10,000 for a pair of speakers (L and R) that has/have (4) 6.5" woofers each that go down to 40 Hz - but have the crossover set to 80 Hz?

Wouldn't it be more appropriate to use those 4 woofers in each speaker to their potential and set the crossover to 60 Hz - if not a little lower confused.gif
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post #29 of 35 Old 06-11-2012, 12:49 PM
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Quote:
Originally Posted by HomeTheaterGuy74 View Post

Hi:
I don't understand everything you said, but I do "get the idea". biggrin.gif
I guess my question was -
Why would I want to pay $10,000 for a pair of speakers (L and R) that has/have (4) 6.5" woofers each that go down to 40 Hz - but have the crossover set to 80 Hz?
Wouldn't it be more appropriate to use those 4 woofers in each speaker to their potential and set the crossover to 60 Hz - if not a little lower confused.gif

The answer is that for music listening you may prefer to simply listen to those very good towers and not use the sub. A lot of subs simply aren't "musical" but are great for sound effects, etc. If your system is pulling double duty (movies and music), having the option to listen to just those very nice speakers may be worth it to you. If you are only talking about a movies system, there really is no benefit to having towers. The cost of the system is kind of irrelevant to the discussion. You can buy cheap towers that will perform down to around 40hz as well, they just won't sound as good doing it.
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post #30 of 35 Old 06-11-2012, 01:22 PM
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Quote:
Originally Posted by HomeTheaterGuy74 View Post

Hi:
I don't understand everything you said, but I do "get the idea". biggrin.gif
I guess my question was -
Why would I want to pay $10,000 for a pair of speakers (L and R) that has/have (4) 6.5" woofers each that go down to 40 Hz - but have the crossover set to 80 Hz?
Wouldn't it be more appropriate to use those 4 woofers in each speaker to their potential and set the crossover to 60 Hz - if not a little lower confused.gif
At least as far as the size i.e. capability of the speakers is concerned, all those woofers should be able to easily reproduce the frequencies around an 80Hz xover point AND provide lots of volume if that is what you want, or need if this system is to be used in a large room.

As far as the xover point, I can't give you really solid advice since 1) every room + system interaction is different and 2) every time I've asked this question myself here and on professional audio forums I never get a consistant answer. Hence my decision to adjust my own system to whatever sounds good.

Oh and subs can sound good with music, but as purplestallion said, some subs aren't really good at reproducing music as well as movie SFX, so this is another case of "does it sound good to me?" Plus for music, I've found that blending a sub well with the sats is important, so extra set-up time (and patience!) should be allocated for that task.
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