Need advice with Orb Audio speakers - AVS Forum
Forum Jump: 
 
Thread Tools
post #1 of 12 Old 06-27-2012, 10:18 PM - Thread Starter
Newbie
 
coutta1's Avatar
 
Join Date: Jun 2012
Posts: 8
Mentioned: 0 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 0 Post(s)
Liked: 10
My situation is this:
I have a large armoire type cabinet that I keep my 46" tv in. There is no room to put speakers on each side of the tv, but I do have a little over 5" directly below my tv. I am not interested in true surround at this point due to budget, room layout, etc...but I wanted to enhance my tv and movie watching, but still have the ability to have great music sound from an ipod. I did consider the Bose Cinemate GS because of it's simplicity and the Energy Elite Soundbar because it would fit perfect under the tv. Overall I think the Orb Audio speakers would give me overall better performance and sound for about the same price. Any thoughts about this choice would be appreciated.

My budget is very limited though and I am trying to piece this system together myself and so far I have a Denon AVR-1612 and plan to order 4 Orb speakers to use with a 2.1 setup. I thought about trying to do a 3.1 setup, but I thought all the speakers would be too close for that since they would all be within a 43" area right below the tv. I am trying to find a good subwoofer now to complete this setup. I know I could get the Super 8 from Orb for $249 from their outlet, but I also have been looking for alternatives due to my budget. Amazon has the Polk Audio PSW10 for only $120 and it has great reviews, but I need advice if it is a good match with the Orbs or if the Super 8 is really worth twice the price of the Polk?

Thanks
coutta1 is offline  
Sponsored Links
Advertisement
 
post #2 of 12 Old 06-27-2012, 11:13 PM
AVS Addicted Member
 
cel4145's Avatar
 
Join Date: Mar 2009
Location: Grand Rapids, MI
Posts: 11,645
Mentioned: 3 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 212 Post(s)
Liked: 746
The PSW10 is not a very good subwoofer. Best to avoid it. Good sub for the price is the Energy S10.3. If you want an 8" sub, the Mirage Omni S8 is the little brother of the S10.3 (Mirage and Energy are owned by the same company and sometimes share designs).

Meanwhile, those Orbs have very tiny drivers in them and no tweeters. Reconsider a good soundbar (ask in the AVS soundbar forum); some come in 2.1 or 3.1, not surround, if that's what you are looking for. Or perhaps some small speakers with bigger driver and tweeter. Checkout HTD's flat panel speakers and see if they would fit: http://www.htd.com/Products/flat-panel-speakers. NHT's SuperZeros are great little mini monitors.

Your questions are answered: Speaker FAQ
HT: Energy RC-50, RC-LCR, Veritas VS Surrounds | Dual CHT SS 18.1s | Denon AVR-888 | modified Dayton SA1000 | Antimode 8033C
Desktop: CBM-170 SE | SVS SB-1000 | Audio-GD NFB-11 | HK 3390
Headphone & Portable HE-400 | K612 Pro | HP150 | DX50 | E12
cel4145 is online now  
post #3 of 12 Old 06-28-2012, 03:01 PM
Advanced Member
 
Robert Cook's Avatar
 
Join Date: Dec 2008
Location: San Diego County, CA, USA
Posts: 985
Mentioned: 0 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 0 Post(s)
Liked: 21
Quote:
Originally Posted by coutta1 View Post

I am not interested in true surround at this point due to budget, room layout, etc...but I wanted to enhance my tv and movie watching, but still have the ability to have great music sound from an ipod.

I won't try to push you toward anything, but I just wanted to say that surround sound may be more feasible than you'd expect. Even though I'm an advocate of high-quality, high-capability surrounds, admittedly you wouldn't need anything fancy or expensive to get the majority of the benefit of 5.1 soundtracks.
Quote:
Originally Posted by coutta1 View Post

I did consider the Bose Cinemate GS because of it's simplicity and the Energy Elite Soundbar because it would fit perfect under the tv. Overall I think the Orb Audio speakers would give me overall better performance and sound for about the same price. Any thoughts about this choice would be appreciated.

The CineMate GS costs about $800, so I guess that would be your budget, and as you know, for $800 you could do better. The Orb speakers are OK for what they are, but they're still only small speakers with full-range drivers, and not the really high quality ones, either.
Quote:
Originally Posted by coutta1 View Post

My budget is very limited though and I am trying to piece this system together myself and so far I have a Denon AVR-1612

I'll subtract $200 from your budget then, which brings your remaining budget to $600.
Quote:
Originally Posted by coutta1 View Post

I thought about trying to do a 3.1 setup, but I thought all the speakers would be too close for that since they would all be within a 43" area right below the tv.

I think that a center speaker would still help--not as much for imaging as usual, perhaps, but for the best dialogue intelligibility for viewers sitting to either side of the middle. How far back are the viewers in your case?
Quote:
Originally Posted by cel4145 View Post

The PSW10 is not a very good subwoofer. Best to avoid it. Good sub for the price is the Energy S10.3. If you want an 8" sub, the Mirage Omni S8 is the little brother of the S10.3 (Mirage and Energy are owned by the same company and sometimes share designs).

Great advice. cool.gif coutta1, if the Energy S10.3 would be a good fit for you, then go ahead and buy it first because it's only $190 until 7/1. It's usually at a great price, and often goes on sale on top of that (how or why, I do not know), but you never know when the cycle is going to end (and you'd have to pay a bit more or wait).
Quote:
Originally Posted by cel4145 View Post

Or perhaps some small speakers with bigger driver and tweeter. Checkout HTD's flat panel speakers and see if they would fit: http://www.htd.com/Products/flat-panel-speakers. NHT's SuperZeros are great little mini monitors.

I really like how the SuperZero 2.0 sounds, although it is rather lacking in bass, and would probably have to be crossed over to the subwoofer at a rather high frequency. There are other small speakers that could fit your dimensional requirements (e.g. Energy V-Mini on its side), but they all have similar limitations. The NHT Absolute Zero is better in this regard and at 5.625" may possibly squeeze in underneath your TV when on its side (maybe--you'd have to measure precisely), but in practice you would only be able to cross it over at 100 Hz--not bad, but I for one can localize some male voices to the sub at this frequency, so it's still a compromise. But this is an excellent speaker and worthy of consideration. At $199 each, two of these plus the S10.3 subwoofer comes out to $588--just within your budget if we base it on the CineMate GS.

Another speaker that may fit is the PSB Image B4 ($330/pair) at 5.25", but while it's a great little speaker that I've recommended for nearfield use or very small rooms, I'm not sure how well it would hold up at higher volumes.

If I were you (I'm not, but IF I were wink.gif), I'd make an effort to accommodate speakers that can handle being crossed over at 80 Hz, which to me makes a noticeable difference for the better. The Ascend Acoustics HTM-200 SE ($318/pair) can handle this, but it's 6.5" tall when on its side. What you could do is place a couple of sheets of 0.75" MDF, plywood, or even particle board (if you're cheap--should work fine wink.gif) underneath your TV to raise it up about 1.5"--that should do it, and you could paint the sheets black to make them inconspicuous.

Another good option in a similar vein (i.e. can be crossed over at 80 Hz and requires that you boost the TV slightly higher) is the Cambridge Audio S30, which has amazing bass for its size and is very affordable at $219/pair. As for the pros and cons between the two, the S30 has better bass when playing on its own without a subwoofer (due in part to being ported), but in a subwoofer-equipped home theater the HTM-200 SE should hold up better at louder volumes (due to having two midwoofers and better power handling with similar efficiency, which makes it less prone to power compression); the HTM-200 SE has a more detailed midrange and treble, but the S30 is also very good and it costs $99 less for the pair. Either way you can't go wrong, in my opinion, and these two speakers are better options than smaller ones that would fit without some help.
Robert Cook is offline  
post #4 of 12 Old 06-28-2012, 03:24 PM - Thread Starter
Newbie
 
coutta1's Avatar
 
Join Date: Jun 2012
Posts: 8
Mentioned: 0 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 0 Post(s)
Liked: 10
Thanks for all the suggestions so far. It's really cool of people to help out like this. I will definitely look into all of these ideas and as far as raising the TV a little bit, that would be no problem since I built a mount to hang it on anyway. It would be simple to adjust it an inch or so.

Since I am such a newbie to all this stuff, I don't understand about subwoofer and speaker crossover and how that affects good sound. Thanks again and if anyone else has any other suggestions I am all ears.
coutta1 is offline  
post #5 of 12 Old 06-28-2012, 09:54 PM
Advanced Member
 
Robert Cook's Avatar
 
Join Date: Dec 2008
Location: San Diego County, CA, USA
Posts: 985
Mentioned: 0 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 0 Post(s)
Liked: 21
Quote:
Originally Posted by coutta1 View Post

Since I am such a newbie to all this stuff, I don't understand about subwoofer and speaker crossover and how that affects good sound.

This subject can get pretty involved, and like so many things it's about finding the optimum balance between various opposing factors. Concerning the subwoofer-speaker crossover frequency, the main factors at play are localization, speaker/subwoofer capabilities, and amplifier power. The crossover frequency itself is where the speakers leave off and the subwoofer takes over for them--the transition is not totally abrupt, but this is the center point between two opposing slopes on a graph, to illustrate (as you go lower in frequency, the speakers' output diminishes as the sub's output rises, and the crossover frequency is where these curves, well, cross over, as it were).

Localization is the ability of your auditory system to perceive where a sound is coming from. Below a certain frequency, which varies between individuals, you lose this ability, for all practical purposes. This is very good for subwoofers since you wouldn't want to be able to localize sounds, such as dialogue that contains deep voices, to your subwoofer. As it happens, 80 Hz is right around where localization becomes a non-issue for the vast majority of people, and for this and various other reasons, it is the de facto industry standard used in studios and commercial movie theaters, and will be the baseline for comparison in this post.

The capabilities of your speakers and subwoofer are also factors, of course. In general, larger speakers and larger drivers are more efficient at reproducing low-frequency sounds (even just having a larger enclosure helps). Tiny "satellite" speakers usually start to strain around 200 Hz; Bose cubes, for example, can't even get this low, and tiny speakers that have higher quality 2" drivers may be able to get down to 150 Hz, but they will be stressed at anything but the lowest volumes. Likewise, most subwoofers aren't designed to reach up high enough in frequency to take over for the suffering satellites--this could leave a gap in the system frequency response, with some frequencies effectively getting left out (resulting in a "thin" sound with missing content) and/or reproduced with a lot of distortion (making people's voices sound "boomy" or "bloated," for example). With slightly larger (but still small) speakers, like most that would fit within 5" under your TV, the situation is improved because they can usually reach down to 120 Hz or even 100 Hz, but this forces you to compromise on localization--for some people a 100 Hz crossover frequency sounds fine, but others may perceive dialogue and other sounds coming from the direction of the subwoofer, which is undesirable. If this is all you can accommodate, then so be it, but my advice would be to get speakers that can be crossed over to the sub at 80 Hz if at all possible.

As for amplifier power, I guess this would be a secondary issue in most people's minds, if they consider it at all, but I try to consider everything. wink.gif Some folks have speakers that can be crossed over lower than 80 Hz, and this may sound better to them, but for bass-heavy movies in particular, this not only puts more strain on the speakers than necessary (increasing distortion), it draws more of the limited amplifier power available from the A/V receivers that most people use, which can potentially cause serious issues. In addition, the more power a speaker uses, the hotter its voice coils (electromagnets in the drivers that move the cones/domes) become, and the less efficient the speaker becomes, which could eventually lead to significant "power compression" and the resultant loss of dynamics or impact. In my opinion, at least for movies, it is better to get a sub that can handle all of the bass below 80 Hz, and cross over the speakers at that frequency rather than a lower one. Put it this way, I've discovered through both theory and lots of experimentation with a decent variety of equipment why 80 Hz is the industry standard for sub crossover frequency--other frequencies can work, too, and may be better for some cases, but in general try to get down to 80 Hz if possible in order to avoid localization, and no lower in most cases in order to take a load off your speakers and receiver.

One more thing that I should mention, which is relevant to your case, is that not all speaker specifications can be taken at face value. The speakers may only be able to achieve some of their specs under certain conditions, which aren't always given, and in practice they may fall short of expectations in some areas; specs don't always tell you everything you need to know anyway. The speaker recommendations I've given above are based on personal experience whenever possible and reliable anecdotal information otherwise, in addition to some of the specs (if I think they mean anything useful wink.gif).
Quote:
Originally Posted by coutta1 View Post

Thanks again and if anyone else has any other suggestions I am all ears.

If you have any other questions, just ask. As for speaker recommendations, I think that if you could raise your TV up by say 2.5", that would probably open the floodgates. smile.gif On the other hand, the speakers would be even larger than the ones I've mentioned, so it's up to you. Have you reconsidered going with minimal surround speakers (you can compromise more here, as much as it pains me to say), or are you still set on just getting a pair of quality speakers up front and a sub?
Robert Cook is offline  
post #6 of 12 Old 06-28-2012, 10:22 PM
AVS Addicted Member
 
zieglj01's Avatar
 
Join Date: Aug 2010
Location: Texas
Posts: 10,687
Mentioned: 6 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 299 Post(s)
Liked: 435
Quote:
Originally Posted by cel4145 View Post

Checkout HTD's flat panel speakers and see if they would fit: http://www.htd.com/Products/flat-panel-speakers.

I can tell you as a former owner of HTD Flat Panel, that they are nice, and good for movies and TV > they are also
good for music listening. I can tell you that the Cambrige Audio S30 is a really nice speaker, and has stood with and
above some popular speakers. They are nice down to 60hz, and do real nice with music and movies. Good Luck!

__________________________________________
Who and Where - is the Way, the Truth and the Life?

Speakers > MB Quart VS05, Boston VS260, Snell K7
Subwoofer > Mordaunt Short Aviano 7
Receiver > Tascam PAR-200, Pioneer VSX-30
zieglj01 is online now  
post #7 of 12 Old 06-28-2012, 11:50 PM - Thread Starter
Newbie
 
coutta1's Avatar
 
Join Date: Jun 2012
Posts: 8
Mentioned: 0 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 0 Post(s)
Liked: 10
I have up to 3" (maxing out at 8" below the TV) that I could move my TV set up. It's not that I am opposed to surround, but my room layout is a really bad layout for it and the misses would probably pass out if I had wires running everywhere. The budget of around $800 was about right and of the speakers mentioned above, I really like what I see and have read about the Cambridge S30's. Another option vs moving my TV up would be to place the speakers on the next shelf down from the TV where I would have room to stand them upright, however there would be 21" from the bottom of the TV to the shelf below that the speakers would sit on...would that make it sound weird being that far below? Another option would be to use a center channel (maybe the S50 if I went with the S30's?) right below the TV and put the speakers on the shelf below as mentioned or to set them on top of the armoire where they would be much more out in the open. Of course there is the original idea of moving the TV up a couple of inches and putting them there.

My only concern about using a center channel is when I would use the speakers for music, from what I have read, a 2.1 system seems to be better for music. Thanks by the way for the explanation on subs and crossover...I can't say that I totally understand it still, but it sure helped a lot. When I get my speakers, amp, and sub all together I will probably have to ask for help in setting the frequencies as recommended.rolleyes.gif

All those speakers mentioned sound like really good speakers and what matters to me most is quality of the sound. I have never been someone who has to have as much thumping bass as possible, I would much rather have good bass and clear sound. I did get to demo a Definitive Technology Procinema 600 or 800 (whichever is $800) at Best Buy in their Magnolia room area and it sounded surprisingly good. Another guy was also demoing an extreme bass setup while I was waiting for the procinema to be loaded and to me the procinemas sounded much better. From what I have read, pretty much all the speakers mentioned above and others that I have researched (HTD flat panel, Cambridge S30, Super Zero 2.0, Absolute Zero, HTM-200 SE, Energy Take 5.1, Energy RC-10, are probably better than the Orbs that I thought about getting when I started this thread. I thought they were a good solution because of their size and they seem very highly rated online, but I think I understand now that for a satellite speaker they are really good, but that there is a big difference between even the best satellite and a high quality bookshelf. I am sure to some respect this correlates on up the scale too.
coutta1 is offline  
post #8 of 12 Old 06-29-2012, 05:59 AM
AVS Addicted Member
 
cel4145's Avatar
 
Join Date: Mar 2009
Location: Grand Rapids, MI
Posts: 11,645
Mentioned: 3 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 212 Post(s)
Liked: 746
Right. Tiny speakers are useful when you have have no choice but to have very small speakers. Acoustically, the larger drivers in bookshelves will be better, and in the case of the Orbs, have a tweeter and a driver in a bookshelf will be getter. However, while likely better than the Orbs since they have a tweeter and driver, the Energy Takes fit in that smaller satellite speaker class. If I were looking for smaller Energy speakers to consider, I'd go for the Veritas V-Minis and matching center because of the larger drivers.

And yes. Music is 2 channel, so most people like 2.1 rather than letting the receiver use processing to send the 2 channels to 3.1. However, you can always switch your receiver back to 2.1 for music listening. In fact, if the Denon 1612 is like my older Denon AVR-888, it should be possible to set it so that when listening to your TV, it automatically uses 3.1, but listening to a CD input, 2 channel. In other words, you can set up speaker output per source input type.

Your questions are answered: Speaker FAQ
HT: Energy RC-50, RC-LCR, Veritas VS Surrounds | Dual CHT SS 18.1s | Denon AVR-888 | modified Dayton SA1000 | Antimode 8033C
Desktop: CBM-170 SE | SVS SB-1000 | Audio-GD NFB-11 | HK 3390
Headphone & Portable HE-400 | K612 Pro | HP150 | DX50 | E12
cel4145 is online now  
post #9 of 12 Old 06-29-2012, 07:42 AM
Advanced Member
 
Robert Cook's Avatar
 
Join Date: Dec 2008
Location: San Diego County, CA, USA
Posts: 985
Mentioned: 0 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 0 Post(s)
Liked: 21
Quote:
Originally Posted by zieglj01 View Post

Quote:
Originally Posted by cel4145 View Post

Checkout HTD's flat panel speakers and see if they would fit: http://www.htd.com/Products/flat-panel-speakers.

I can tell you as a former owner of HTD Flat Panel, that they are nice, and good for movies and TV > they are also
good for music listening.

At 25" wide, however, it doesn't seem that two could fit.
Quote:
Originally Posted by coutta1 View Post

I have up to 3" (maxing out at 8" below the TV) that I could move my TV set up.

This would allow you to accommodate a great many bookshelf speakers, actually, as long as depth isn't an issue (based on what you've said, I doubt that there is an issue).
Quote:
Originally Posted by coutta1 View Post

It's not that I am opposed to surround, but my room layout is a really bad layout for it and the misses would probably pass out if I had wires running everywhere.

Alright, I just didn't want to simply give up in case somebody could come up with a solution.
Quote:
Originally Posted by coutta1 View Post

The budget of around $800 was about right and of the speakers mentioned above, I really like what I see and have read about the Cambridge S30's.

As capable as it is, the S30 is still a somewhat small speaker, with the limitations that go with this. How large is your room (including all spaces it is largely open to), and how far back do the viewers sit?
Quote:
Originally Posted by coutta1 View Post

Another option vs moving my TV up would be to place the speakers on the next shelf down from the TV where I would have room to stand them upright, however there would be 21" from the bottom of the TV to the shelf below that the speakers would sit on...would that make it sound weird being that far below?

It's best to keep the speakers as close to the TV as possible on the vertical axis, and keeping them farther away from the floor is also beneficial, not only because it won't sound weird, but it helps avoid too much sound reflecting off the floor, which can sound harsh.
Quote:
Originally Posted by coutta1 View Post

Another option would be to use a center channel (maybe the S50 if I went with the S30's?) right below the TV and put the speakers on the shelf below as mentioned or to set them on top of the armoire where they would be much more out in the open. Of course there is the original idea of moving the TV up a couple of inches and putting them there.

How tall is the armoire? I'm thinking that this position would probably be too high. Generally, the best height for a speaker is where its tweeter is near ear level, and right under your TV would probably--unless you have a strange setup--come the closest (you tell me).

As for the S50, I haven't heard it myself, but I'm kind of disturbed that its specs indicate inferior bass capability and lower efficiency than the S30 (you can't always trust specs, but relative specs from the same product line usually mean something)--you may be forced to cross it over higher than 80 Hz, and the center is the single most important speaker (for movies, when you have one). Given the fact that a pair of S30s doesn't cost much more than a single S50, if you go with the S30, I'd recommend getting a second pair instead, and using one of them as a center (sell off the other one or keep it as a spare).
Quote:
Originally Posted by coutta1 View Post

My only concern about using a center channel is when I would use the speakers for music, from what I have read, a 2.1 system seems to be better for music.

I suppose it's arguable, but this is a non-issue anyway because you could always play back music in 2.1 at your option, even if you have a center speaker.
Quote:
Originally Posted by coutta1 View Post

Thanks by the way for the explanation on subs and crossover...I can't say that I totally understand it still, but it sure helped a lot.

No problem. I couldn't get any search hits that covered the breadth of information that I was looking for in one place, so I had to whip it up myself--hopefully it will turn up when other people do a search now.
Quote:
Originally Posted by coutta1 View Post

When I get my speakers, amp, and sub all together I will probably have to ask for help in setting the frequencies as recommended.rolleyes.gif

Sure, ask away. In the meantime, what you've read will gradually, subconsciously seep in, and you should grasp the subject more readily by then. That's what happens with me, anyway. Learning anything new is always daunting and seems overwhelming at first, but the mind keeps working at it, whether you're aware of it or not. wink.gif
Quote:
Originally Posted by coutta1 View Post

All those speakers mentioned sound like really good speakers and what matters to me most is quality of the sound. I have never been someone who has to have as much thumping bass as possible, I would much rather have good bass and clear sound.

Well, ideally the relative levels of all of your speakers--including the subwoofer--would be calibrated to match the standard used in the mixing and mastering of movie soundtracks. Your system will try to play back all of the bass present in a soundtrack, and I was just pointing out that some movies have a lot of bass content at times (you could turn down the subwoofer, but then you'd be bass-deficient all of the time). So I don't view what we're doing here as trying to get more bass than you need, but rather trying to make sure that your speakers can handle what is being asked of them, which is a major aspect of sound quality. Too small of a speaker being played too loudly (for its capabilities) in too large of a space could result in missing content (namely upper bass) and lower sound quality. Unfortunately, size matters.
Quote:
Originally Posted by coutta1 View Post

I did get to demo a Definitive Technology Procinema 600 or 800 (whichever is $800) at Best Buy in their Magnolia room area and it sounded surprisingly good. Another guy was also demoing an extreme bass setup while I was waiting for the procinema to be loaded and to me the procinemas sounded much better.

I have no idea what the differences in these setups might have been. Maybe they turned the bass way up or were using larger but inferior speakers or something. You'll be able to tune your system to a useful degree once you have it set up, and you'll have to anyway because any audio system will sound different in different rooms (especially the bass).
Quote:
Originally Posted by coutta1 View Post

From what I have read, pretty much all the speakers mentioned above and others that I have researched (HTD flat panel, Cambridge S30, Super Zero 2.0, Absolute Zero, HTM-200 SE, Energy Take 5.1, Energy RC-10, are probably better than the Orbs that I thought about getting when I started this thread.

Yes, they're all better, and I had forgotten how slender the RC-10 is or else I would have mentioned it earlier.
Quote:
Originally Posted by coutta1 View Post

I thought they were a good solution because of their size and they seem very highly rated online, but I think I understand now that for a satellite speaker they are really good, but that there is a big difference between even the best satellite and a high quality bookshelf. I am sure to some respect this correlates on up the scale too.

I'm not even sure the Orbs are that good for satellites--they're better than most that you'd find packaged together in a cheap 5.1 system, but there are small satellite speakers that are significantly better still (having a quality tweeter helps a lot, and the Orbs don't have tweeters).

As for how much increased size gives you, the point of diminishing returns starts in earnest around where you can cross over the subwoofer at 80 Hz. After that it's more of a matter of how much output you need (especially around 80 Hz, as bass frequencies are generally the most challenging to reproduce) versus how much a speaker can provide. You'll still get some improvement in sound quality as you move up in size anyway because larger speakers with more and/or larger drivers move air more efficiently (less cone movement or excursion is required), but you'll soon start paying a lot more money for smaller gains in sound quality if you really don't need that much output.
Robert Cook is offline  
post #10 of 12 Old 06-29-2012, 08:52 PM - Thread Starter
Newbie
 
coutta1's Avatar
 
Join Date: Jun 2012
Posts: 8
Mentioned: 0 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 0 Post(s)
Liked: 10
My room is about 35' long and is a combination dining room and living room. This picture kinda lays it out with the armoire being brown and the seating being blue. Seating is about 11' from the TV and directly behind the far side seating is a bay window and behind the lower seating is a door and stairway that leads upstairs. The armoire is 6' 5" tall and 54" wide. The area right below the TV is right at ear level when seated.

158

I was able to go to Best Buy again tonight and get them to run several speakers in 2.1 mode including some Energy CB-10's, Definitive's StudioMonitor 45, and B&W 685 and 686. All were partnered with the Energy C10 sub. To me the 685's sounded the best overall with the 686's and Definitive about the same behind. The Energy's sounded good, but they sounded more muffled or deeper or something. Those were about the closest things they had to the one's that have been brought up. I know it sounds corny, but I like the looks of the Cambridge S30's in the dark oak if that is a true veneer (not plastic or cheap looking).....however I kept wondering which of the speakers I was hearing in person the S30's would sound most like. I wish I could hear the NHT speakers in person, but HH Gregg and Best Buy are about all I have around here.
coutta1 is offline  
post #11 of 12 Old 06-29-2012, 11:30 PM
AVS Addicted Member
 
zieglj01's Avatar
 
Join Date: Aug 2010
Location: Texas
Posts: 10,687
Mentioned: 6 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 299 Post(s)
Liked: 435
Quote:
Originally Posted by coutta1 View Post

I was able to go to Best Buy again tonight and get them to run several speakers in 2.1 mode including some Energy CB-10's, Definitive's StudioMonitor 45, and B&W 685 and 686. All were partnered with the Energy C10 sub. To me the 685's sounded the best overall with the 686's and Definitive about the same behind. The Energy's sounded good, but they sounded more muffled or deeper or something. Those were about the closest things they had to the one's that have been brought up. I know it sounds corny, but I like the looks of the Cambridge S30's in the dark oak if that is a true veneer (not plastic or cheap looking).....however I kept wondering which of the speakers I was hearing in person the S30's would sound most like. I wish I could hear the NHT speakers in person, but HH Gregg and Best Buy are about all I have around here.

The Cambridge S30 is not real veneer - they put more into the performace area, than looks. This is
so they can keep the price low. They are real good, for a budget friendly speaker with a good cross
braced cabinet and good speaker drivers. They are good sounding speakers, and were not made to
sound like B&W, Definitive Tech or Energy. For me, they perform at a higher level over some of the
big name entry level speakers. To me, they are not boomy, shouty, spitty or nasal/congested sounding.
They do not sound thin, hollow or muddy - and they do not sound bright, sharp/shrill, or laid back. >>
Now, can some speakers do some things better than the S30 - the answer is yes - they are not perfect.
However overall - they are realistic sounding and are not easy to trump, if you keep the volume below
extreme levels.
There is no guarantee that you will like the Cambridge, or if they are for you. You have some nice choices
to check out - Good Luck!

__________________________________________
Who and Where - is the Way, the Truth and the Life?

Speakers > MB Quart VS05, Boston VS260, Snell K7
Subwoofer > Mordaunt Short Aviano 7
Receiver > Tascam PAR-200, Pioneer VSX-30
zieglj01 is online now  
post #12 of 12 Old 06-30-2012, 04:19 AM
AVS Special Member
 
smasher50's Avatar
 
Join Date: Apr 2009
Location: right behind you
Posts: 2,083
Mentioned: 0 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 51 Post(s)
Liked: 1161
Quote:
Originally Posted by zieglj01 View Post

The Cambridge S30 is not real veneer - they put more into the performace area, than looks. This is
so they can keep the price low. They are real good, for a budget friendly speaker with a good cross
braced cabinet and good speaker drivers. They are good sounding speakers, and were not made to
sound like B&W, Definitive Tech or Energy. For me, they perform at a higher level over some of the
big name entry level speakers. To me, they are not boomy, shouty, spitty or nasal/congested sounding.
They do not sound thin, hollow or muddy - and they do not sound bright, sharp/shrill, or laid back. >>
Now, can some speakers do some things better than the S30 - the answer is yes - they are not perfect.
However overall - they are realistic sounding and are not easy to trump, if you keep the volume below
extreme levels.
There is no guarantee that you will like the Cambridge, or if they are for you. You have some nice choices
to check out - Good Luck!

+1 great little speaker for its price

i'm so laid back,i'm laid out
smasher50 is offline  
Reply Speakers

User Tag List

Thread Tools
Show Printable Version Show Printable Version
Email this Page Email this Page


Forum Jump: 

Posting Rules  
You may not post new threads
You may not post replies
You may not post attachments
You may not edit your posts

BB code is On
Smilies are On
[IMG] code is On
HTML code is Off
Trackbacks are Off
Pingbacks are Off
Refbacks are Off