Damaged speaker cable: Could the two speakers be wired with the AVR via 2 positives but only 1 negative? - AVS Forum
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post #1 of 2 Old 03-27-2013, 04:52 AM - Thread Starter
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I have two ceiling speakers (in a bedroom). Unfortunately it appears that one speaker cable has been damaged somewhere along the route during the renovation works of my flat. The speaker itself has been tested by the installer and works fine. So it looks as something has either cut partially the cable or a screw/nail has been put inside. It is not possible to determine where the cable has been damaged as it goes a long way through walls/ceiling. However only one conductor of the speaker cable has been damaged.

Could I bypass the damaged conductor by using the undamaged conductor for the positive and then wire the negative connector of this speaker to the other ceiling speaker (which speaker cable is not damaged) so to as to share its negative conductor? Hence there will be 2 positive conductors for each speaker, but one shared negative conductor. Could I still get Stereo audio? Will the AVR negative connector be overloaded? Is there a piece of equipment to be used to potentially solve this problem?

For reference, the AVR is a Yamaha RX-V373.

Many thanks in advance for your help!

Pistou
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post #2 of 2 Old 03-27-2013, 05:48 AM
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Originally Posted by Pistou View Post


Could I bypass the damaged conductor by using the undamaged conductor for the positive and then wire the negative connector of this speaker to the other ceiling speaker (which speaker cable is not damaged) so to as to share its negative conductor?
You may, if the receiver amp outputs share a common ground. Not all do, many amps have a floating ground, and if you do connect floating grounds damage can result. The only way to be sure is to use a VOM or DMM to measure the resistance between the amp grounds, and if it's anything but zero do not connect them.

Bill Fitzmaurice Loudspeaker Design

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