Solid copper electrical wire for speaker wire? - AVS Forum
Forum Jump: 
Reply
 
Thread Tools
post #1 of 67 Old 12-27-2013, 08:42 PM - Thread Starter
Member
 
Himmy33's Avatar
 
Join Date: Nov 2013
Posts: 32
Mentioned: 0 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 0 Post(s)
Liked: 10

I purchased a house that is wired for 7.1 in a theater room. The previous owner in his infinite wisdom used general everyday solid copper electrical wire used for general wiring in houses. Probably because it was cheaper for him but whatever... My question is I have Klipsch RF-7 II for the left and right and Klipsch RC-64 II for the center. Powering them is a Yamaha Aventage RX-A820. When I try to calibrate the system with the YPAO system it starts with the left speaker and the Yamaha turns off before completing the first speaker. When I turn the Yamaha back on it says check speaker wire. Some sort of fail safe to keep from damaging the Yamaha? I have checked and its all correct. I even bypassed the left speaker and tried the center and right and again it kicks off before even completing the first speaker with the same message. Could the solid copper electrical cable being used in the walls be causing this? I have not had a chance to bypass the the electrical cable entirely by using 12g speaker wire straight from the Yamaha to the speakers but thought I would ask here first before cutting lengths of speaker wire and finding out that's not the problem. Any help would be greatly appreciated. Also if this is in the wrong area please let me know and I will repost in the correct area.


-Himmy33
Himmy33 is offline  
Sponsored Links
Advertisement
 
post #2 of 67 Old 12-27-2013, 09:26 PM
Advanced Member
 
jevans64's Avatar
 
Join Date: Dec 2007
Posts: 772
Mentioned: 0 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 7 Post(s)
Liked: 52
Nothing inherently wrong with using solid copper wire for speakers. Stranded wire is used mainly because it is flexible and easy to run. If I had to guess at the problem, I would suspect that the wire is making contact with a 120v wire in the wall somewhere. Only way to find out is to go ahead and make a temporary set of cables and test them outside of the wall.

HD-DVD = 94
Blu-Ray = 120 ( 24 Warner red2blu )
jevans64 is offline  
post #3 of 67 Old 12-27-2013, 10:59 PM - Thread Starter
Member
 
Himmy33's Avatar
 
Join Date: Nov 2013
Posts: 32
Mentioned: 0 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 0 Post(s)
Liked: 10

Good to know. I plan on hooking up a volt meter to the connectors and see what type of readings I get. I have a feeling it will turn to running direct lines though...


-Himmy33
Himmy33 is offline  
post #4 of 67 Old 12-28-2013, 05:42 AM
AVS Special Member
 
Bill Fitzmaurice's Avatar
 
Join Date: Nov 2009
Location: New Hampshire
Posts: 9,282
Mentioned: 0 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 1 Post(s)
Liked: 1193
Quote:
Originally Posted by Himmy33 View Post

When I turn the Yamaha back on it says check speaker wire. Some sort of fail safe to keep from damaging the Yamaha? 
It probably indicates a low impedance problem. Is there any sound before it cuts out? If not the wire is probably shorted.

Bill Fitzmaurice Loudspeaker Design

The Laws of Physics aren't swayed by opinion.
Bill Fitzmaurice is online now  
post #5 of 67 Old 12-28-2013, 09:10 AM - Thread Starter
Member
 
Himmy33's Avatar
 
Join Date: Nov 2013
Posts: 32
Mentioned: 0 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 0 Post(s)
Liked: 10
Quote:
Originally Posted by Bill Fitzmaurice View Post


It probably indicates a low impedance problem. Is there any sound before it cuts out? If not the wire is probably shorted.

I'm not sure what low impedance is? Sorry I am a newb. There is some sound that comes from it. You can hear  the speaker gradually step up in sound but it does not get very loud at all before it kicks out.


-Himmy33
Himmy33 is offline  
post #6 of 67 Old 12-28-2013, 09:22 AM
AVS Special Member
 
commsysman's Avatar
 
Join Date: Dec 2007
Location: Southern California
Posts: 5,191
Mentioned: 1 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 79 Post(s)
Liked: 243
The best way to eliminate the wire in the wall as the problem is to connect the speakers with some other speaker wire and see if they work.

Monoprice sells a 50-foot roll of 14-gauge pure copper speaker wire for only $13. Part #2748.
commsysman is offline  
post #7 of 67 Old 12-28-2013, 11:00 AM
AVS Special Member
 
Bill Fitzmaurice's Avatar
 
Join Date: Nov 2009
Location: New Hampshire
Posts: 9,282
Mentioned: 0 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 1 Post(s)
Liked: 1193
Quote:
Originally Posted by Himmy33 View Post

I'm not sure what low impedance is? Sorry I am a newb. There is some sound that comes from it. You can hear  the speaker gradually step up in sound but it does not get very loud at all before it kicks out.
That probably indicates a fault in the wire. It's not a dead short, or there would be no sound, but there is probably some contact being made within the cable. If you measure the cable at one end, with the other end disconnected, the resistance between the two conductors should be zero.

Bill Fitzmaurice Loudspeaker Design

The Laws of Physics aren't swayed by opinion.
Bill Fitzmaurice is online now  
post #8 of 67 Old 12-28-2013, 04:33 PM - Thread Starter
Member
 
Himmy33's Avatar
 
Join Date: Nov 2013
Posts: 32
Mentioned: 0 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 0 Post(s)
Liked: 10
Quote:
Originally Posted by commsysman View Post

The best way to eliminate the wire in the wall as the problem is to connect the speakers with some other speaker wire and see if they work.

Monoprice sells a 50-foot roll of 14-gauge pure copper speaker wire for only $13. Part #2748.

I actually have 100ft of there 12-guage :)


-Himmy33
Himmy33 is offline  
post #9 of 67 Old 12-28-2013, 04:34 PM - Thread Starter
Member
 
Himmy33's Avatar
 
Join Date: Nov 2013
Posts: 32
Mentioned: 0 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 0 Post(s)
Liked: 10
Quote:
Originally Posted by Bill Fitzmaurice View Post


That probably indicates a fault in the wire. It's not a dead short, or there would be no sound, but there is probably some contact being made within the cable. If you measure the cable at one end, with the other end disconnected, the resistance between the two conductors should be zero.

Good info to know.


-Himmy33
Himmy33 is offline  
post #10 of 67 Old 12-28-2013, 06:17 PM
AVS Special Member
 
JerryLove's Avatar
 
Join Date: Oct 2010
Location: Tampa, FL
Posts: 1,597
Mentioned: 0 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 0 Post(s)
Liked: 76
If I understand your setup, though the in-wall speaker wire is solid, you are using stranded from the wall to the speaker / AVR?

In addition to a potential short in the solid wire (or the connector at the wall), what you describe is also typical of a whisker-short. That's where one strand (or more) of stranded wire is not properly seated in the connector and touches the other connector or other wire. Take a look at your connection points for such a short.
JerryLove is offline  
post #11 of 67 Old 12-28-2013, 07:57 PM
AVS Special Member
 
Bill Fitzmaurice's Avatar
 
Join Date: Nov 2009
Location: New Hampshire
Posts: 9,282
Mentioned: 0 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 1 Post(s)
Liked: 1193
Quote:
Originally Posted by Himmy33 View Post

Good info to know.
One common source of a short in household wiring is nails or screws that the drywall was put up with penetrating the cable. To prevent that code says that a metal sheath be put on the studs where the wire passes through them, so a nail or screw can't be driven in that spot. You do the same with plumbing. It could be something of that sort has happened, with a nail or screw just barely connecting the two conductors.

Bill Fitzmaurice Loudspeaker Design

The Laws of Physics aren't swayed by opinion.
Bill Fitzmaurice is online now  
post #12 of 67 Old 12-29-2013, 01:56 AM - Thread Starter
Member
 
Himmy33's Avatar
 
Join Date: Nov 2013
Posts: 32
Mentioned: 0 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 0 Post(s)
Liked: 10
Quote:
Originally Posted by JerryLove View Post

If I understand your setup, though the in-wall speaker wire is solid, you are using stranded from the wall to the speaker / AVR?

In addition to a potential short in the solid wire (or the connector at the wall), what you describe is also typical of a whisker-short. That's where one strand (or more) of stranded wire is not properly seated in the connector and touches the other connector or other wire. Take a look at your connection points for such a short.

I will give this a look.


-Himmy33
Himmy33 is offline  
post #13 of 67 Old 12-29-2013, 01:57 AM - Thread Starter
Member
 
Himmy33's Avatar
 
Join Date: Nov 2013
Posts: 32
Mentioned: 0 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 0 Post(s)
Liked: 10
Quote:
Originally Posted by Bill Fitzmaurice View Post


One common source of a short in household wiring is nails or screws that the drywall was put up with penetrating the cable. To prevent that code says that a metal sheath be put on the studs where the wire passes through them, so a nail or screw can't be driven in that spot. You do the same with plumbing. It could be something of that sort has happened, with a nail or screw just barely connecting the two conductors.

This is what I'm thinking. Using a volt meter should determine if this is the issue correct?


-Himmy33
Himmy33 is offline  
post #14 of 67 Old 12-29-2013, 07:34 AM
AVS Special Member
 
Bill Fitzmaurice's Avatar
 
Join Date: Nov 2009
Location: New Hampshire
Posts: 9,282
Mentioned: 0 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 1 Post(s)
Liked: 1193
Quote:
Originally Posted by Himmy33 View Post

This is what I'm thinking. Using a volt meter should determine if this is the issue correct?
Yes, if you measure for resistance at one end of the wire it should be zero. If you read any resistance something is connecting the two conductors somewhere.

Bill Fitzmaurice Loudspeaker Design

The Laws of Physics aren't swayed by opinion.
Bill Fitzmaurice is online now  
post #15 of 67 Old 12-29-2013, 07:47 AM
AVS Special Member
 
commsysman's Avatar
 
Join Date: Dec 2007
Location: Southern California
Posts: 5,191
Mentioned: 1 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 79 Post(s)
Liked: 243
Quote:
Originally Posted by Bill Fitzmaurice View Post

Yes, if you measure for resistance at one end of the wire it should be zero. If you read any resistance something is connecting the two conductors somewhere.

I think Bill got this turned around inadvertently. That seems confusing and incorrect.


The correct procedure is to take a resistance reading across the speaker terminals with no wires connected to them (step 1). Record the exact reading.

Then connect the speaker wires to the speakers and take a resistance reading across the two unconnected wires at the other end. (step 2).

The second reading should be about the same, but one or two tenths of an ohm higher (due to the added resistance of the wires), as you are now reading the same resistance of the speaker again, but through the wires.

If the step 2 reading is LOWER than step 1, there is a short in the wiring somewhere. That is the ONLY way it can be lower.


BTW- Do not concern yourself with the actual resistance reading across the speaker. This is DC resistance, NOT the IMPEDANCE of the speaker.
commsysman is offline  
post #16 of 67 Old 12-29-2013, 09:12 AM - Thread Starter
Member
 
Himmy33's Avatar
 
Join Date: Nov 2013
Posts: 32
Mentioned: 0 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 0 Post(s)
Liked: 10
Quote:
Originally Posted by commsysman View Post


I think Bill got this turned around inadvertently. That seems confusing and incorrect.


The correct procedure is to take a resistance reading across the speaker terminals with no wires connected to them (step 1). Record the exact reading.

Then connect the speaker wires to the speakers and take a resistance reading across the two unconnected wires at the other end. (step 2).

The second reading should be about the same, but one or two tenths of an ohm higher (due to the added resistance of the wires), as you are now reading the same resistance of the speaker again, but through the wires.

If the step 2 reading is LOWER than step 1, there is a short in the wiring somewhere. That is the ONLY way it can be lower.


BTW- Do not concern yourself with the actual resistance reading across the speaker. This is DC resistance, NOT the IMPEDANCE of the speaker.

I should be posting results today. We will see how it goes. Fingers crossed.


-Himmy33
Himmy33 is offline  
post #17 of 67 Old 12-29-2013, 10:05 AM
AVS Special Member
 
Bill Fitzmaurice's Avatar
 
Join Date: Nov 2009
Location: New Hampshire
Posts: 9,282
Mentioned: 0 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 1 Post(s)
Liked: 1193
Quote:
Originally Posted by Himmy33 View Post

I should be posting results today. We will see how it goes. Fingers crossed.
To repeat, to test for a short measure the resistance by connecting the meter to both conductors at one end of the cable, with the other end of the cable not connected to anything. If it reads with resistance you have a bad cable. It should read either nothing or something really high, like in the megohm range. Another possibility exists, that the cable isn't shorted but it has a break in it. Some signal would still pass via capacitance, explaining why you get some signal to the speaker. That wouldn't show up on a meter testing resistance, though it would on one capable of measuring capacitance. However, you can test for that as well by connecting the two conductors at the free end of the wire. Doing so if the wire's not broken you'll get a resistance reading of well under an ohm, perhaps even zero ohms, depending on the meter resolution.

Bill Fitzmaurice Loudspeaker Design

The Laws of Physics aren't swayed by opinion.
Bill Fitzmaurice is online now  
post #18 of 67 Old 12-29-2013, 08:11 PM - Thread Starter
Member
 
Himmy33's Avatar
 
Join Date: Nov 2013
Posts: 32
Mentioned: 0 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 0 Post(s)
Liked: 10
Quote:
Originally Posted by Bill Fitzmaurice View Post


To repeat, to test for a short measure the resistance by connecting the meter to both conductors at one end of the cable, with the other end of the cable not connected to anything. If it reads with resistance you have a bad cable. It should read either nothing or something really high, like in the megohm range. Another possibility exists, that the cable isn't shorted but it has a break in it. Some signal would still pass via capacitance, explaining why you get some signal to the speaker. That wouldn't show up on a meter testing resistance, though it would on one capable of measuring capacitance. However, you can test for that as well by connecting the two conductors at the free end of the wire. Doing so if the wire's not broken you'll get a resistance reading of well under an ohm, perhaps even zero ohms, depending on the meter resolution.

So I hooked the speakers up bypassing the in wall wires and bingo no problem at all. The odd thing is when I hook the volt meter up to the terminals without any speakers connected a get nothing. Im confused and kind of bummed. Not sure how I'm going to figure this out...


-Himmy33
Himmy33 is offline  
post #19 of 67 Old 12-30-2013, 06:43 AM
AVS Special Member
 
Bill Fitzmaurice's Avatar
 
Join Date: Nov 2009
Location: New Hampshire
Posts: 9,282
Mentioned: 0 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 1 Post(s)
Liked: 1193
Quote:
Originally Posted by Himmy33 View Post

So I hooked the speakers up bypassing the in wall wires and bingo no problem at all. The odd thing is when I hook the volt meter up to the terminals without any speakers connected a get nothing.
By nothing I assume you mean no reading, and that's what you want to see. Now go to step two, tie the conductors together at one end, test them at the other. You should get a reading of zero ohms or very close to that. If you don't there's a break in the wire.

Bill Fitzmaurice Loudspeaker Design

The Laws of Physics aren't swayed by opinion.
Bill Fitzmaurice is online now  
post #20 of 67 Old 12-30-2013, 06:53 AM
AVS Addicted Member
 
arnyk's Avatar
 
Join Date: Oct 2002
Location: Grosse Pointe Woods, MI
Posts: 13,846
Mentioned: 0 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 401 Post(s)
Liked: 1045
Quote:
Originally Posted by Himmy33 View Post

I purchased a house that is wired for 7.1 in a theater room. The previous owner in his infinite wisdom used general everyday solid copper electrical wire used for general wiring in houses. Probably because it was cheaper for him but whatever...

There are no technical problems with solid copper wire as speaker cable from a sound quality standpoint.

However it is a bit stiff and hard to bend around corners and terminate with standard audio connectors.

The speaker wiring in my liviing room is home wiring grade 12 gauge coarsly stranded wire. The terminations are Speakon Terminals which have a lot of advantages including the ability to work well with a variety of different cable types.

Its probably more conventional to use CL3 12 or 14 gauge speaker cable, but from a sound quality a certain amount of copper per foot is all that matters.
Quote:
My question is I have Klipsch RF-7 II for the left and right and Klipsch RC-64 II for the center. Powering them is a Yamaha Aventage RX-A820. When I try to calibrate the system with the YPAO system it starts with the left speaker and the Yamaha turns off before completing the first speaker. When I turn the Yamaha back on it says check speaker wire. Some sort of fail safe to keep from damaging the Yamaha?

In all likelihood, yes.

When I was doing my in-wall wiring I immediately tested it with my receiver and it would not even power up with one of my runs. It turned out that run had one wire that was shorted to house safety ground. Once I corrected that, all was well.
Quote:
 I have checked and its all correct. I even bypassed the left speaker and tried the center and right and again it kicks off before even completing the first speaker with the same message

With all due respect, I question your checking. AVR cable checking is pretty reliable unless the AVR itself is bad. You can check that by moving the speaker cable being inspected to a different usage.

If you've got a 5.1 or larger system, you can obtain some spare pairs for swapping and testing by configuring down to a 2.0 system, for example.

Remember that the speaker cables need both continuity and absence of shorting, including shorting to other household wiring including safety grounds.
Quote:
Could the solid copper electrical cable being used in the walls be causing this?

Not a chance! Not a snowball's chance in San Diego!
Quote:
I have not had a chance to bypass the the electrical cable entirely by using 12g speaker wire straight from the Yamaha to the speakers but thought I would ask here first before cutting lengths of speaker wire and finding out that's not the problem. Any help would be greatly appreciated. Also if this is in the wrong area please let me know and I will repost in the correct area.

Your choice of posting areas seems OK.

BTW, you've already had some good advice from Bill F. and Jerry L.
arnyk is online now  
post #21 of 67 Old 12-30-2013, 07:57 AM
Member
 
walter scott's Avatar
 
Join Date: Nov 2004
Location: Baton Rouge
Posts: 197
Mentioned: 0 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 1 Post(s)
Liked: 10
Quote:
Originally Posted by Bill Fitzmaurice View Post

That probably indicates a fault in the wire. It's not a dead short, or there would be no sound, but there is probably some contact being made within the cable. If you measure the cable at one end, with the other end disconnected, the resistance between the two conductors should be zero.

That’s actually backwards. With neither the receiver nor the speakers connected to the cable, the resistance between the two conductors should be infinite. With the conductors shorted together at the receiver end or at the speaker end, and measuring at the other set of connectors the resistance should be 0, or at least a very small fraction of an ohm. Don’t confuse a volt meter with an ohm meter. A volt meter will not help you resolve this issue, you need an ohm meter.
walter scott is offline  
post #22 of 67 Old 12-30-2013, 08:19 AM
Senior Member
 
Skytrooper's Avatar
 
Join Date: Nov 2010
Location: Baden, Pa.
Posts: 427
Mentioned: 0 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 9 Post(s)
Liked: 77
Quote:
Originally Posted by JerryLove View Post

If I understand your setup, though the in-wall speaker wire is solid, you are using stranded from the wall to the speaker / AVR?

In addition to a potential short in the solid wire (or the connector at the wall), what you describe is also typical of a whisker-short. That's where one strand (or more) of stranded wire is not properly seated in the connector and touches the other connector or other wire. Take a look at your connection points for such a short.

Whisker shorts used to be common in coax cable. To measure properly on the high ohms scale make sure to use a clip on the meter or some other method so both of your hands are not touching the wires and meter leads at the same time or you will be reading your body's resistance. Your reading should be infinite.

Kind of wondering wondering if the ground wire is causing him any issues.

(LCD - Sony KDL - XBR4) (Receiver - Sony STR-DA4ES)(Blu Ray - Oppo BDP-83) (PS3)( Dish Hopper DVR With Sling) Speakers (L & R - Paradigm Studio 20) (Center -Paradigm CC-470) (Surrounds & Back Surrounds - Paradigm SA-15R in walls) (Subwoofer 1 - Sunfire HRS-12) (Subwoofer 2 - Paradigm PW-2100)
Skytrooper is offline  
post #23 of 67 Old 12-30-2013, 09:16 AM
AVS Special Member
 
Bill Fitzmaurice's Avatar
 
Join Date: Nov 2009
Location: New Hampshire
Posts: 9,282
Mentioned: 0 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 1 Post(s)
Liked: 1193
Quote:
Originally Posted by walter scott View Post

That’s actually backwards. With neither the receiver nor the speakers connected to the cable, the resistance between the two conductors should be infinite.
Infinite (open circuit) with most meters gives no reading.

Bill Fitzmaurice Loudspeaker Design

The Laws of Physics aren't swayed by opinion.
Bill Fitzmaurice is online now  
post #24 of 67 Old 12-30-2013, 09:57 AM
Member
 
walter scott's Avatar
 
Join Date: Nov 2004
Location: Baton Rouge
Posts: 197
Mentioned: 0 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 1 Post(s)
Liked: 10
Quote:
Originally Posted by Bill Fitzmaurice View Post

Infinite (open circuit) with most meters gives no reading.

An analog meter, such as a Simpson 260, has a little infinity symbol on the extreme left of the scale. When selected for resistance and presented with an open circuit the needle will not move, thus indicating infinite resistance. When presented with a short circuit the needle with swing across the scale to 0.

My Beckman digital meter indicates infinity by flashing the most significant digit on and off.

The easiest way to determine how a meter will behave is to note the reading when the probs are shorted vs. when they are apart.
walter scott is offline  
post #25 of 67 Old 12-30-2013, 11:03 AM
Senior Member
 
Darrin_R's Avatar
 
Join Date: Aug 2002
Posts: 278
Mentioned: 0 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 0 Post(s)
Liked: 14
I had this exact problem. It turned out to be the mic used for calibration.
Darrin_R is offline  
post #26 of 67 Old 12-30-2013, 12:13 PM
Member
 
walter scott's Avatar
 
Join Date: Nov 2004
Location: Baton Rouge
Posts: 197
Mentioned: 0 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 1 Post(s)
Liked: 10
Quote:
Originally Posted by Darrin_R View Post

I had this exact problem. It turned out to be the mic used for calibration.

I thought the OP could proceed with calibration using his own wiring, which points to the in wall cables rather than the mic. I think the person who said there may be a ground wire issue is on the right track.
walter scott is offline  
post #27 of 67 Old 01-01-2014, 11:59 PM - Thread Starter
Member
 
Himmy33's Avatar
 
Join Date: Nov 2013
Posts: 32
Mentioned: 0 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 0 Post(s)
Liked: 10
Quote:
Originally Posted by walter scott View Post


I thought the OP could proceed with calibration using his own wiring, which points to the in wall cables rather than the mic. I think the person who said there may be a ground wire issue is on the right track.

I starting to lean toward this as well. How would I even go about firguring out if this is the problem or how to solve it?


-Himmy33
Himmy33 is offline  
post #28 of 67 Old 01-02-2014, 05:55 AM
AVS Special Member
 
KidHorn's Avatar
 
Join Date: Nov 2003
Location: Derwood, Maryland
Posts: 2,771
Mentioned: 0 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 105 Post(s)
Liked: 173
If running a new wire outside the wall works fine and the in wall wire doesn't, what does it matter what's causing the problem? It's either a short or open and either way, you won't be able to fix it without tearing a hole in the wall.

The bottom line is you won't be able to use the in wall wiring for that speaker. You'll need to run a new line to it.
KidHorn is online now  
post #29 of 67 Old 01-02-2014, 06:30 AM
Senior Member
 
Skytrooper's Avatar
 
Join Date: Nov 2010
Location: Baden, Pa.
Posts: 427
Mentioned: 0 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 9 Post(s)
Liked: 77
Quote:
Originally Posted by Bill Fitzmaurice View Post

Infinite (open circuit) with most meters gives no reading.

Like I said earlier, keep your fingers off the meter leads or you will see your body's resistance rather than infinite.

Any how, I think the chances of that electrical wire being bad are very slim, other than a bad screw up. It's obvious the OP wants to use his existing wiring. I would look at the bare ground wire and see if it some how is being used. If it is being used, cut it. You only need 2 conductors.

(LCD - Sony KDL - XBR4) (Receiver - Sony STR-DA4ES)(Blu Ray - Oppo BDP-83) (PS3)( Dish Hopper DVR With Sling) Speakers (L & R - Paradigm Studio 20) (Center -Paradigm CC-470) (Surrounds & Back Surrounds - Paradigm SA-15R in walls) (Subwoofer 1 - Sunfire HRS-12) (Subwoofer 2 - Paradigm PW-2100)
Skytrooper is offline  
post #30 of 67 Old 01-02-2014, 11:58 PM - Thread Starter
Member
 
Himmy33's Avatar
 
Join Date: Nov 2013
Posts: 32
Mentioned: 0 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 0 Post(s)
Liked: 10
Quote:
Originally Posted by KidHorn View Post

If running a new wire outside the wall works fine and the in wall wire doesn't, what does it matter what's causing the problem? It's either a short or open and either way, you won't be able to fix it without tearing a hole in the wall.

The bottom line is you won't be able to use the in wall wiring for that speaker. You'll need to run a new line to it.

So if the problem is the ground wire how would I figure this out? If it is there is no way to fix it without tearing up the walls?


-Himmy33
Himmy33 is offline  
Reply Speakers

User Tag List

Thread Tools
Show Printable Version Show Printable Version
Email this Page Email this Page


Forum Jump: 

Posting Rules  
You may not post new threads
You may not post replies
You may not post attachments
You may not edit your posts

BB code is On
Smilies are On
[IMG] code is On
HTML code is Off
Trackbacks are Off
Pingbacks are Off
Refbacks are Off