Middle speaker issue at higher volumes - AVS Forum
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post #1 of 6 Old 08-16-2014, 08:55 PM - Thread Starter
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Middle speaker issue at higher volumes

I have a 5.1 Jamo S606 HCS3 set of speakers matched with a Yamaha RX-v673 receiver and Jamo 650w sub.

Whenever I play a movie at fairly loud settings, the middle speaker seems to not be as clear compared to when it's on a lower volume. It seems like it reaches a peak when the sound spikes and it can't match the output. I imagine my receiver should be able to handle these speakers buy maybe it's just damaged?
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post #2 of 6 Old 08-16-2014, 10:44 PM
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Originally Posted by ch1sox View Post
I have a 5.1 Jamo S606 HCS3 set of speakers matched with a Yamaha RX-v673 receiver and Jamo 650w sub.

Whenever I play a movie at fairly loud settings, the middle speaker seems to not be as clear compared to when it's on a lower volume. It seems like it reaches a peak when the sound spikes and it can't match the output. I imagine my receiver should be able to handle these speakers buy maybe it's just damaged?
Turn it down. The volume level you are choosing is asking for more power to be delivered to the speaker than the receiver can produce. This causes clipping of the waveform and that can damage the speaker. If the speaker isn't already damaged, you can solve the problem by getting a receiver with more power, replacing the speakers with ones that are more efficient, or by adding an outboard amp, if the receiver is capable of pre-amp out.
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post #3 of 6 Old 08-16-2014, 11:23 PM - Thread Starter
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Originally Posted by RayGuy View Post
Turn it down. The volume level you are choosing is asking for more power to be delivered to the speaker than the receiver can produce. This causes clipping of the waveform and that can damage the speaker. If the speaker isn't already damaged, you can solve the problem by getting a receiver with more power, replacing the speakers with ones that are more efficient, or by adding an outboard amp, if the receiver is capable of pre-amp out.
Would you know how much power my receiver would need? It currently outputs 90 watts it says. These are the specs of the speakers:

Woofer (mm / in) - 203 / 8
Midrange (mm / in) - 2 x 127 / 5
Tweeter (mm / in) - 25 / 1
Power ( W, long / short term) -130 / 210
Sensitivity (dB/2,8V/1m) - 89
Frequency Range (Hz) - 42 - 20.000
Cross-over Frequency (Hz) - 150 / 2.500
Impedance (Ohm) - 6

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post #4 of 6 Old 08-17-2014, 05:38 AM
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You can only get so much out of a pair of 5 inch drivers. You've found out how much. Big sound requires big speakers, that's something you can't get around.

Bill Fitzmaurice Loudspeaker Design

The Laws of Physics aren't swayed by opinion.
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post #5 of 6 Old 08-17-2014, 11:03 AM
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Originally Posted by Bill Fitzmaurice View Post
You can only get so much out of a pair of 5 inch drivers. You've found out how much. Big sound requires big speakers, that's something you can't get around.
Bill makes a good point. You could be exceeding the ability of the speaker to perform at the volumes you are looking for. One way to test this theory is to disconnect the other speakers (being sure the bare wires do not touch) allowing the receiver to push more power to the remaining speaker. Turn the volume up to the level you normally run at and replay the scene that caused the issue. Does it sound OK now? If so, it's a wattage problem, If not, you have the issue Bill mentioned, or you have a blown speaker.

As to the receiver power issue, that can be a difficult one to answer. There is a lot of "fudging" of power numbers among receiver manufacturers. The Yamahas are known to be one of the worst in this regard. Your actual available power, all channels driven, is probably more in the neighborhood of 30 watts per channel.

FYI: Receivers that are known for not fudging the numbers are Denon, Marantz, and NAD. A fifty watt receiver from any of these brands will clearly outperform the 90 watt rated Yamaha.

One last point, bass takes a lot more power than mids and treble. Are you crossing over the speakers to a sub? At what frequency? If you set the center channel to small, crossing over at 80 or 100 Hz, you will need far less power to drive the speaker to the level you want. The trade-off will be less bass from the center channel (that should be the sub's job anyway).

Let us know the results of your testing.

Last edited by RayGuy; 08-17-2014 at 03:07 PM.
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post #6 of 6 Old 08-21-2014, 07:34 PM - Thread Starter
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Bill Fitzmaurice View Post
You can only get so much out of a pair of 5 inch drivers. You've found out how much. Big sound requires big speakers, that's something you can't get around.
Quote:
Originally Posted by RayGuy View Post
Bill makes a good point. You could be exceeding the ability of the speaker to perform at the volumes you are looking for. One way to test this theory is to disconnect the other speakers (being sure the bare wires do not touch) allowing the receiver to push more power to the remaining speaker. Turn the volume up to the level you normally run at and replay the scene that caused the issue. Does it sound OK now? If so, it's a wattage problem, If not, you have the issue Bill mentioned, or you have a blown speaker.

As to the receiver power issue, that can be a difficult one to answer. There is a lot of "fudging" of power numbers among receiver manufacturers. The Yamahas are known to be one of the worst in this regard. Your actual available power, all channels driven, is probably more in the neighborhood of 30 watts per channel.

FYI: Receivers that are known for not fudging the numbers are Denon, Marantz, and NAD. A fifty watt receiver from any of these brands will clearly outperform the 90 watt rated Yamaha.

One last point, bass takes a lot more power than mids and treble. Are you crossing over the speakers to a sub? At what frequency? If you set the center channel to small, crossing over at 80 or 100 Hz, you will need far less power to drive the speaker to the level you want. The trade-off will be less bass from the center channel (that should be the sub's job anyway).

Let us know the results of your testing.
I think you both are correct. I set the frequency to ~80 and re-ran the YPAO settings on the Yamaha. I also had to set the speakers to Small and one of the speakers apparently had the black and red switched (whoops!). It does sound better, but it only seems to get so loud. I'll be upgrading so I've been researching things like Ascen CMT-340 SE, EMP TeK E55TI, etc. There's so many to choose from! I'll probably make a new thread or something.

Last edited by ch1sox; 08-21-2014 at 09:06 PM.
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