Damaged crossover/driver changing waveform? - AVS | Home Theater Discussions And Reviews
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Damaged crossover/driver changing waveform?

Hey guys,

Quick question, is it possible for a (potentially) damaged crossover and/or driver to change the waveform going in into something else (ie. introduce imperfections etc). Thanks!
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You question isn't very clear. What type of crossover? And into what else?

Active crossovers feed Amps.

Passive crossovers feed speakers.

How is the crossover damaged?

As to a 'driver' going into something else, for the most part, a 'driver' can only go into a room.

I'm sure you have a legitimate question, and many here are willing to help, but I think you need to explain what you are talking about in a little more detail.

I think in general, the answer has to be YES, it is possible for a damaged component to alter what you hear.

Steve/bluewizard
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Quote:
Originally Posted by chaosrealm93 View Post
is it possible for a (potentially) damaged crossover and/or driver to change the waveform going in into something else (ie. introduce imperfections etc).
Yes. It can be manifested in a number of ways, including altered response and higher THD.

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Quote:
Originally Posted by bluewizard View Post
You question isn't very clear. What type of crossover? And into what else?

Active crossovers feed Amps.

Passive crossovers feed speakers.

How is the crossover damaged?

As to a 'driver' going into something else, for the most part, a 'driver' can only go into a room.

I'm sure you have a legitimate question, and many here are willing to help, but I think you need to explain what you are talking about in a little more detail.

I think in general, the answer has to be YES, it is possible for a damaged component to alter what you hear.

Steve/bluewizard
Sorry for not clarifying.

Passive crossovers in my case. And yes, the driver goes directly into the room (though I'm not sure what else it can go into).

The driver nor crossover is verified to be damaged. The reason I ask is because of an experiment gone bad. I was listening to a section of classical music (at moderate levels in Audacity) when I noticed a lack of treble and transparency and tried to EQ boost frequencies between 2-4kHz +20db.

The result may or may not be psychological or real damage done to the components. From what I can see now(log frequency tone sweeps and white/pink noise tests readings taken from SignalScope on iphone), the output seems to be on par with reference frequency responses of this speaker, but it intrigues me whether the driver/crossover could appear to pass these tests and yet produce an altered waveform that what it was fed.

Thanks for your patience!

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It seems unlikely that you would damage the Crossover.

It sounds like this is connected to a computer, so does the system have a separate amp or is the amp built into the speakers?

Most speaker suffer physical damage, though the source of the damage can be physical, the cause is electrical.

As to why the sound dropped out in that particular range in the first place, I have to ask if the speakers can be bi-wired. That is, do they have FOUR speaker terminals on the back. If they do, then there should be a Jumper Bar connecting the RED to the RED and the BLACK to the BLACK. Make sure those Jumper Bars are in place and making contact.

Just a few thoughts.

Steve/bluewizard
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Quote:
Originally Posted by chaosrealm93 View Post
I noticed a lack of treble and transparency and tried to EQ boost frequencies between 2-4kHz +20db.
+20dB is a one hundred fold increase in power, so damage to both the crossover components and drivers is a distinct possibility.
Quote:
it intrigues me whether the driver/crossover could appear to pass these tests and yet produce an altered waveform that what it was fed.
An SPL and THD sweep would show it. It's possible to damage the crossover and still have the speaker work, albeit improperly.

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post #7 of 8 Unread Today, 01:19 PM - Thread Starter
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Quote:
Originally Posted by bluewizard View Post
It seems unlikely that you would damage the Crossover.

It sounds like this is connected to a computer, so does the system have a separate amp or is the amp built into the speakers?

Most speaker suffer physical damage, though the source of the damage can be physical, the cause is electrical.

As to why the sound dropped out in that particular range in the first place, I have to ask if the speakers can be bi-wired. That is, do they have FOUR speaker terminals on the back. If they do, then there should be a Jumper Bar connecting the RED to the RED and the BLACK to the BLACK. Make sure those Jumper Bars are in place and making contact.

Just a few thoughts.

Steve/bluewizard
The source is a computer and the speakers are passive, amped with a receiver. The chain goes as follows.
computer > coaxial > pioneer VSX 520 > speakers

The sound didn't really "drop out" per say.... it's just that the recording was poor to begin with (David Garrett vs Paganini, caprice 24). I figured the CD was going to be the soundtrack to the movie minus the SFX (crowd cheering/clapping etc.), but apparently not.

The speakers can be bi-wired and bi-amped, but I don't do either. I just checked the jumper bar and it's attached on there securely
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Bill Fitzmaurice View Post
+20dB is a one hundred fold increase in power, so damage to both the crossover components and drivers is a distinct possibility.
An SPL and THD sweep would show it. It's possible to damage the crossover and still have the speaker work, albeit improperly.
That's the thing. All the empirical proofs show it's working properly. That's why I wanted additional perspectives on this to see if it's all in my head or if the damage is real haha
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