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post #1 of 146 Unread 05-26-2015, 04:54 PM - Thread Starter
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Klipsch RP-280F Tower Speakers Official AVS Forum Review

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These sizeable and powerful speakers sit at the top of the Reference Premiere line, but how do they sound?



Klipsch is one of the best-known speaker brands in the US and is virtually synonymous with horn-loaded designs intended for home use. The company's signature Klipschorn speaker has been in continuous production for 69 years, a world record. Klipsch is also a major player in the commercial-cinema arena.

The Reference Premiere series of ten different speakers replaces Klipsch's Reference II series, with performance-enhancing improvements in design and materials. The new series is the top of the Reference lineup and the core of the company's business.

This review is about the flagship RP-280F tower speaker ($675/each) used in a 2-channel system, with and without the addition of subwoofers. I will follow up with a 7.1 system review examining surround-sound music and home-theater applications. For now, the focus is on 2-channel music playback.


Features

The RP-280F is a 2-way tower speaker featuring a horn-loaded 1" titanium-dome tweeter and dual 8" aluminum-cone woofers. A large, ported, internally braced cabinet holds all the drivers. Each speaker weighs 62.5 pounds and measures 10.5" (W) by 43" (H) and 18.3" deep.

The MDF cabinets of the review samples came in an ebony finish; Klipsch also offers a cherry option. According to the company, the chamfered front baffle helps reduce diffraction effects. A magnetic grill attaches with ease, but these speakers look particularly great with the grills off, thanks to the spun-copper finish of the woofers.

Klipsch claims a frequency response from 32 Hz to 25 kHz (+/- 3 dB) for the RP-280F. Rated sensitivity is 98 dB/2.83V/m, and each speaker can handle up to 150 watts of continuous power (600 watts peak) with 8 ohms nominal impedance. The crossover frequency is 1750 Hz, and the speaker supports bi-amping as well as bi-wiring. A tuned Tractrix port vents to the rear.


Here's a view of the rear-mounted Tractrix port

The 1" titanium-dome tweeter sits in a newly developed Tractrix horn made out of compressed, molded rubber. The new material is designed to dampen the resonances that sometimes make horn-loaded tweeters sound harsh or colored.


The horn on the RP-280F is made of molded rubber.


Setup

The RP-280F towers arrived in perfect condition, protectively packed in massive boxes. Unpacking was quick and easy. There was no assembly required aside from the installation of spikes or rubber feet—I went with rubber feet.

A Crestron Procise PSPHD decoded the digital audio for all of my 2-channel listening. Amplification came courtesy of a Crestron ProAmp 7x250, and I used a miniDSP DDRC-88A with Dirac Live for room correction and EQ.

I connected the towers using a pair of 12-gauge speaker cables. My source was a DIY Windows PC running iTunes and Tidal, connected to the PSPHD via HDMI. The RP-280F offers the option to bi-amp, but the Crestron ProAmp produces more than enough power to negate the need for that approach.

In order to accommodate the rear-mounted Tractrix ports, I allowed two feet of space between the backs of the speakers and the front wall. The centers of the drivers were 28" from the side walls and 70" apart from each other, in a symmetrical arrangement. Measured from the main listening position (MLP), my head was approximately 76" away from each speaker.

Twin Klipsch R-115SW subwoofers (which I reviewed here) provided low-end reinforcement and extension for 2.1-channel listening. I placed the subs in the front left and right corners of the room and relied on Dirac Live room correction in the DDRC-88A to deal with the inevitable peaks and dips in frequency response.


Performance

The RP-280Fs are gentle giants. From the moment I plugged them in, they impressed me with their smoothness, detailed imaging, and capacity to render fine detail. Sure, they play loud and have dynamic impact—everyone expects that from Klipsch. Even so, the speakers' finesse was what dominated my first impressions.

Using nearfield frequency-response measurements, I estimated that the RP-280F's port-tuning frequency is approximately 36 Hz.

With a rated sensitivity of 98 dB/2.83V/m, the RP-280F is an easy speaker to power. Furthermore, it offers a sufficiently wide frequency response that a subwoofer is not a necessity—once EQ'd with Dirac Live, I enjoyed nearly flat bass response down to 24 Hz. The RP-280Fs are quite competent when it comes to bass reproduction—not only do they dig deep, but they have plenty of headroom when playing loud.

Between the ProAmp's 250 watt/channel output and the efficiency of the Klipsch towers, I had no problem getting the volume up to party levels and even live-concert levels. Yet, I did not have to blast music to appreciate the power of the RP-280Fs—even at modest volume levels, I could feel the music.

After profiling the RS-280Fs, I played a 24 Hz sine wave measuring 96 dB from the MLP; there was no sign of strain and no audible distortion. All I heard was deep and powerful bass.

The RP-280 does a great job with the midrange and treble as well. Midrange frequencies came through with precision and clarity, even though the speaker is a 2-way design. The tweeter was smooth and precise, with no sign of the "honkiness" that sometimes afflicts horns.

When I added a pair of R-115SW subs to the system, the combination really shook things up at higher volume levels. With the addition of subs and Dirac Live room correction, the system's bass response extended down to 18 Hz. In my 1800-cubic-foot studio, it was trivially easy to achieve an SPL of 100+ dB when using the subs—even at 18 Hz.

I used a 50-Hz crossover to eliminate any possibility of localizing the subs. This freed up the RP-280F woofers from having to deal with the deepest bass—after all, the subs have a lot more headroom at low frequencies than the speakers do.


Listening

The RP-280F towers make you want to listen to more music, which is the most crucial quality for a speaker to possess. All the characteristics of a great speaker are present in abundance, including precise imaging, wide dynamic range, crystal clarity, and transparent neutrality.

During critical listening, I sat precisely centered in the MLP. I played each track at least twice, once with the speakers running full-range and once with the twin R-115SW subs. I used the DDRC-88A with Dirac Live processing during all of my listening sessions.

Bill Laswell's "Thomupa" from the album Sacred System Chapter Two provided the Klipsch towers an opportunity to show off their speed. Tabla and sitar open the track but give way to jazz drums, a trumpet, and Laswell on electric bass. The lush and expansive recording has a captivating groove and possesses exceptional fidelity. Deep layering and attention to production detail results in a very precisely delineated soundfield where every instrument is clear and distinct—the RP-280Fs did a great job painting a clear aural picture.

Comparing the track with and without the subs, the difference in bass response was minimal at best. Laswell's bass lines had a tiny bit more heft during the lowest notes with the subs, but it verged on statistically insignificant. Much to my surprise, the RP-280Fs had enough gusto to handle the track on their own.

Snoop Dogg's new album Bush—produced by Pharrell Williams—is a funky disco-tinged rap romp that often sounds sublime. The first track, "California Roll," features Stevie Wonder in a laid-back groove that begs to be turned up. The recording is full of energy and very resolute. While the RP-280Fs sounded good on their own, adding subs provided a significant boost to the bass in this case—let's face it, Snoop and subwoofers are always a good combo.

I needed a couple of tracks to show off how the speakers handle fast, thick, aggressive rock. I chose Ministry's "Just One Fix" and "TV II" for the task. I've heard Ministry play live—one of the great things about the band is that it sounds just about the same on stage as it does in the studio. With a good system playing loud and clear, listening to Ministry is a lot like being at a live show. The RP-280Fs kept the sounds separated, delivering the authentic Ministry experience—for a moment I felt nostalgic about mosh pits and crowd surfing.

"TV II" is fast, minimalist, brutal, and ugly. It's also an example of virtuoso drumming and incorporates ominous, cavernous feedback along with blisteringly fast guitar work by Mike Scaccia. The Klipsch towers are just about the perfect speakers for reproducing fast, complex, aggressive music.

I could not sense any discernible difference between playing Ministry with and without subs—the RP-280Fs had all the bass response needed to play back Ministry properly.

"Inertia Creeps" by Massive Attack—off the album Mezzanine—is a fine example of the band's impeccable production style. I'm at a loss to describe exactly how the mix comes across, but if you have any doubts about the capacity of the RP-280Fs to handle well-recorded and complex music, then you should play this track on 'em.

Notably, "Inertia Creeps" benefitted quite a bit from the addition of subs—there's a physicality to 2.1 playback that's missing from the 2.0 rendition. Even at lower volumes, the subs shook things up a bit.

The Beastie Boys' album The In Sound from Way Out is full of funky instrumental gems. "Ricky's Theme" is a blast to blast on the Klipsch towers. Thanks to liberal use of reverb, big drums, and bigger bass lines, it has an all-consuming effect—the band is in your face. The production is top-notch, and speakers' imaging delivered the sense of three-dimensionality that comes through when you are playing the track on a great speaker system.

The only catch with the RP-280Fs' rendition of "Ricky's Theme" was the clear improvement offered by the addition of the subs. The bass became thicker and fatter—in an entirely good way—and the drums had more impact. It's curious to me that some tracks benefitted a lot more from the addition of subs than others.

I'm not sure how many audiophiles buy Klipsch speakers to listen to classical music, but if they do, they won't be disappointed.

The 1975 Deutsche Grammophon recording of Beethoven's Symphony No. 5, conducted by Carlos Kleiber and performed by the Vienna Philharmonic, is considered an all-time classic. I've heard quite a few speakers struggle to reproduce it with both finesse and gusto, but the RP-280Fs survived the challenge. There's a lot to be said for the extra headroom the speakers' high sensitivity brings to the table.

To my ears, there was zero difference between using subs and running the speakers full-range. Notably, the subs did not detract from the overall sound quality. Woodwinds, brass, strings, and percussion all came through the mix in proper proportions. All the instruments in the orchestra came through with proper timbre and dynamic impact, while the soundstage was cohesive and appropriate in scale.

Most importantly, the Klipsch towers have the dynamic headroom to handle classical playback, which tends to be demanding because of the wide range between the quietest and loudest passages. Have I heard better renditions of the recording from other speakers? Sure. Just not from tower speakers that cost less than the RP-280Fs.

Turning toward jazz and funk, I queued up Herbie Hancock's album Head Hunters. From the first bass lick on "Chameleon" to the last drum hit on "Vein Melter," the album had me bobbing my head and tapping my toes thanks to the tight, solid, and faithful rendition of the tracks by the towers.

Interestingly, using subwoofers did nothing to improve the bass on Head Hunters, even at very high volume levels. The real surprise was how well the horn-loaded tweeters handled the sharp sounds from Herbie's keyboard. The biting, cutting quality of the synthesized sounds came through, but without excessive sibilance that would make it unlistenable.

Recoiled is an unofficial remix EP containing five Nine Inch Nails tracks remixed by industrial-music legends Coil. "Closer (Unrecalled)" is equal parts NIN and Coil, mingling melodies, squeaky sound effects, drums, atonal drones, and Trent Reznor's voice in a deeply layered psychedelic audio stew. The mix is thick yet precise with bass deep enough to demand the use of the dual subs. As is typical with Coil's mixes, sounds seemed to expand beyond the speakers, creating a tangibly three-dimensional soundfield. The speakers totally disappeared.


Conclusion

Klipsch's RP-280F is an excellent tower speaker that's a great choice for 2-channel audiophile-style listening, as well as for pumping up the volume at a house party. It is a refined-sounding speaker system that can also rock like a PA.

The RP-280Fs are a viable choice for a standalone 2-channel system. The primary caveat is that such large speakers might produce too much bass if used full-range in a small room and without EQ. Unless you have a near-perfect listening room, I recommend using a bit of EQ to get the most out of any speaker system.

When paired with one or more competent subs such as the R-115SW, the RP-280Fs offered an abundance of dynamic headroom, without suffering cone-excursion limitations in the deepest bass notes. Thanks to 8-ohm impedance, they are a good match for almost any amplifier, AV receiver, or integrated amp.

By using rubber for its latest Tractrix cone tweeter, Klipsch appears to have eliminated any resonances that would give it away. I heard no coloration; the treble from the RP-280Fs is as clear and smooth as anything I've experienced from a tower in its price range. Anyone who thinks Klipsch means harsh highs is in for a big surprise when they hear the new horn on the Reference Premiere towers.

This review tells only half the RP-280F story. I'll have a full 7.1 system review that adds the RP-450C center-channel speaker, RP-160M bookshelf/monitors, and RP-250S surround speakers to the mix. I don't think it's much of a spoiler to suggest that the towers are a good choice for home cinema as well as 2-channel audio.


REVIEW SYSTEM

Sources

DIY PC (Windows 8) running Tidal and iTunes

Amplification and Processing

Crestron Procise PSPHD pre/pro
Crestron Procise ProAmp 7x250
MiniDSP DDRC-88A Dirac Live processor

Cables

Monoprice 12-gauge OFC speaker cables
Mediabridge Ultra Series subwoofer cable
Mediabridge Ultra Series HDMI cable

Subwoofers

Klipsch R-115SW subwoofers (2)


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Mark Henninger

Last edited by imagic; 07-15-2015 at 11:00 AM.
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post #2 of 146 Unread 05-26-2015, 06:12 PM
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Great review! I had also been wondering if the harsh tones from Klipsch horn loaded speakers would be mitigated by their new design. I have inexpensive Synergy F-20's that have definitely made me a Klipsch fan because of their efficiency and ability to play loud.
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post #3 of 146 Unread 05-26-2015, 06:22 PM
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Thanks for the review! What's the MSRP for these?

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post #4 of 146 Unread 05-26-2015, 06:24 PM
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Hi Mark - how do these speakers compare against the SVS Prime Towers you recently reviewed?
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post #5 of 146 Unread 05-26-2015, 06:27 PM
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OMG i have these speaker and dam the bass is insane!. when i first received them i thought really hard if i needed a sub ^_^. totally worth the cash. awesome design and audio quality.

Receiver - Sony STR-DH550
Front - Klipsch Reference Premiere RP-280F
Center
- Klipsch Reference Premiere RP-450C
Sub - Rythmik FV15HP
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post #6 of 146 Unread 05-26-2015, 06:31 PM
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Also can you recommend a cross over frequency that will allow it to produce clean bass but pass the big stuff to the subwoofer? i am watching War of the Worlds right now on 50hz down from 120hz and up from 40hz. does the lower cross over muddy the voice clarity or am i misinformed?.

Receiver - Sony STR-DH550
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Center
- Klipsch Reference Premiere RP-450C
Sub - Rythmik FV15HP
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post #7 of 146 Unread 05-26-2015, 06:32 PM - Thread Starter
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Thanks for the review! What's the MSRP for these?
$675/each

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post #8 of 146 Unread 05-26-2015, 06:35 PM
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Not sure if you mentioned it might have missed, but was the DDRC-88A with Dirac Live engaged for every single track, or did you alternate with and without Dirac?


Thanks

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post #9 of 146 Unread 05-26-2015, 06:35 PM - Thread Starter
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Also can you recommend a cross over frequency that will allow it to produce clean bass but pass the big stuff to the subwoofer? i am watching War of the Worlds right now on 50hz down from 120hz and up from 40hz. does the lower cross over muddy the voice clarity or am i misinformed?.
Here's the graph from Dirac Live. Tons of output at 50 Hz.

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post #10 of 146 Unread 05-26-2015, 07:18 PM
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Wow! Those are some crazy height speakers mounted to the ceiling!
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post #11 of 146 Unread 05-26-2015, 08:28 PM - Thread Starter
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IMHO, using Dirac Live for the entire review is just wrong. $1350/pr for the speakers. Then add in the cost of the DDRC-88A. And a calibrated mike. You weren't reviewing the speakers in even a semi-normal environment. You were reviewing the software that adjusted the speakers to your room. I can imagine a scenario where almost any speaker adjusted to the parameters you choose will sound very similar in your studio. Speakers should be reviewed without external adjustment/compensation. That's the only legitimate way to compare one to another.
Given the availability of EQ and room correction on modern AV gear, I disagree. Indeed, I plan to make Dirac Live a part of all my speaker reviews.
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Given the availability of EQ and room correction on modern AV gear, I disagree. Indeed, I plan to make Dirac Live a part of all my speaker reviews.
I would be interested in seeing these or any speakers tested with Dirac live vs Audyssey XT32 vs Audyssey Pro.


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Quote:
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Given the availability of EQ and room correction on modern AV gear, I disagree. Indeed, I plan to make Dirac Live a part of all my speaker reviews.
Mark, have you experimented with Dirac Live and compared it against a modern AVR's built in EQ (say MCACC or Audyssey)? I'm curious if Dirac Live really makes that much of a difference as compared to the built in EQs in higher end AVRs.

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Thomupa -> Thunupa
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Mark, have you experimented with Dirac Live and compared it against a modern AVR's built in EQ (say MCACC or Audyssey)? I'm curious if Dirac Live really makes that much of a difference as compared to the built in EQs in higher end AVRs.
Yes, I have compared it to the lastest MCACC in my Pioneer Elite SC-85 and to Audyssey MultEQ XT (but not XT32). Does it do an explicitly better job? That could very well be a matter of opinion. One of the reasons I'm using Dirac Live is it's available in a stand-alone box (the miniDSP DDRC-88A) that I can use with just about any pre/pro, AVR with pre-out, and any amp. If I am going to use room correction—and my room is not perfect so I'd rather use it than not—I prefer a solution I can implement in any system, rather than being tied to what's provided by any given manufacturer.

I am working on a DDRC-88A review for this week. I do think Dirac Live is effective.
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Here's the graph from Dirac Live. Tons of output at 50 Hz.

If you haven't already, you might try listening to the results if you don't boost the frequency extension with Dirac. With treble especially, I have found that boosting the natural extension creates an harsh/edgy sound, and that I preferred it unboosted. This is not a problem, however, with speakers that can recreate upper frequencies without boosting. I am guessing that the problem is that the speaker designers roll off the treble to keep distortion below audible levels, and that boosting it raises the distortion above audible levels.
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Quote:
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Given the availability of EQ and room correction on modern AV gear, I disagree. Indeed, I plan to make Dirac Live a part of all my speaker reviews.
I think it would be most useful if the sound quality was reviewed both with an without Dirac.
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Quote:
Originally Posted by jhughy2010 View Post
Mark, have you experimented with Dirac Live and compared it against a modern AVR's built in EQ (say MCACC or Audyssey)? I'm curious if Dirac Live really makes that much of a difference as compared to the built in EQs in higher end AVRs.
My experience comparing Dirac Live (PC version) to Audyssey XT32 Pro is that Dirac Live gives MUCH better control and results. I found the difference to be similar in magnitude to getting new speakers.
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post #19 of 146 Unread 05-27-2015, 07:31 AM - Thread Starter
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I think it would be most useful if the sound quality was reviewed both with an without Dirac.
Sure. Here goes: Without Dirac Live, the sound was not as well-balanced, especially in the bass region... but that's my room's fault as opposed to the speaker's fault.

Very few people have a near-perfect room, nobody has a perfect room. In relative terms, many people have room correction software in their AVRs and pre/pros. 'Nuf said.

If I review speakers without Dirac Live (or other room correction/EQ solutions), I'm really reviewing my room and not the speakers, even though I understand some people think that by using room correction, you are reviewing the software itself and not the speakers. IMO the benefits of using room correction for all of my listening outweigh the minuses, and I can't please everybody.

In future reviews, I'll consider writing about comparing one or two tracks with and then without Dirac Live. But that's not a promise.
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post #20 of 146 Unread 05-27-2015, 08:04 AM
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...During critical listening, I sat precisely centered in the MLP. I played each track at least twice, once with the speakers running full-range and once with the twin R-115SW subs. I used the DDRC-88A with Dirac Live processing during all of my listening sessions.



When paired with one or more competent subs such as the R-115SW, the RP-280Fs offered an abundance of dynamic headroom, without suffering cone-excursion limitations in the deepest bass notes. Thanks to 8-ohm impedance, they are a good match for almost any amplifier, AV receiver, or integrated amp.
The Klipsch }RF-7s dipped below 4 Ohms in a couple of frequencies (above 80 Hz) which made having a power source able to cover those dips important...

I gather in your 1800 cu ft room most any AVR should be able to drive that setup in a multispeaker configuration, but noticed that Klipsch labels the RP-280F as "8 Ohm Compatible"--Does that mean that they probably have lower impedance dips and harder to drive than the 98 dB Sensitivity rating suggests? If so, is that something someone should consider when selecting AVRs and/or external amps?

Thanks--Nice review.
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Originally Posted by Zen Traveler View Post
The Klipsch }RF-7s dipped below 4 Ohms in a couple of frequencies (above 80 Hz) which made having a power source able to cover those dips important...

I gather in your 1800 cu ft room most any AVR should be able to drive that setup in a multispeaker configuration, but noticed that Klipsch labels the RP-280F as "8 Ohm Compatible"--Does that mean that they probably have lower impedance dips and harder to drive than the 98 dB Sensitivity rating suggests? If so, is that something someone should consider when selecting AVRs and/or external amps?

Thanks--Nice review.
It's almost certain there are dips since all speakers vary. But I doubt it's enough to give an AVR a hard time. I'm curious to see some measurements.

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post #22 of 146 Unread 05-27-2015, 08:24 AM
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Given the availability of EQ and room correction on modern AV gear, I disagree. Indeed, I plan to make Dirac Live a part of all my speaker reviews.
This is strange: the comment to which you are responding doesn't exist.

Nonetheless, in support of GLBright's concern...

Quote:
Originally Posted by imagic
The real surprise was how well the horn-loaded tweeters handled the sharp sounds from Herbie's keyboard. The biting, cutting quality of the synthesized sounds came through, but without excessive sibilance that would make it unlistenable.
and

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Originally Posted by imagic
Anyone who thinks Klipsch means harsh highs is in for a big surprise when they hear the new horn on the Reference Premiere towers.
The speakers have been re-eq'd. You can eq out peaks that would have made the sound bright or harsh. And since eq has been applied, I don't know whether the comments above are more a review of Dirac processing or the inherent design/character of the speaker itself.

In my work I'm eqing out harshness, brightness, hisses and hums from a huge variety of sound files almost every day. It takes sometimes takes very little eq to alter the character of the sound...sometimes a lot....but you generally won't know by listening to the equed result that the original had an issue, or how prominent that characteristic was before being remedied.

A review that automatically applies eq to the speaker leaves me in a similar situation. What does the original - the item I'd actually purchase - sound like?

But I won't comment on this for future speaker reviews; I'll just accept that the reviews here won't quite be for folks like me, with my old fogey notions of speaker reviewing.

Marc, that aside, I am very intrigued by Dirac and you are one of the guys I'd turn to for such a review!

Cheers,
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post #23 of 146 Unread 05-27-2015, 08:57 AM - Thread Starter
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Originally Posted by R Harkness View Post
This is strange: the comment to which you are responding doesn't exist.

Nonetheless, in support of GLBright's concern...



and



The speakers have been re-eq'd. You can eq out peaks that would have made the sound bright or harsh. And since eq has been applied, I don't know whether the comments above are more a review of Dirac processing or the inherent design/character of the speaker itself.

In my work I'm eqing out harshness, brightness, hisses and hums from a huge variety of sound files almost every day. It takes sometimes takes very little eq to alter the character of the sound...sometimes a lot....but you generally won't know by listening to the equed result that the original had an issue, or how prominent that characteristic was before being remedied.

A review that automatically applies eq to the speaker leaves me in a similar situation. What does the original - the item I'd actually purchase - sound like?

But I won't comment on this for future speaker reviews; I'll just accept that the reviews here won't quite be for folks like me, with my old fogey notions of speaker reviewing.

Marc, that aside, I am very intrigued by Dirac and you are one of the guys I'd turn to for such a review!

Cheers,
Great point. My primary use for room correction and EQ is dealing with the mess below Schroeder. I'm totally open to leaving the mids and highs alone for some of the listening process, and while I cannot discuss specifics of a forthcoming update to Dirac Live from miniDSP, I can offer a hint... it will offer a lot of flexibility.

And, I can (and should) speak to your point... the highs were smooth without any EQ or processing applied.

I also want to point out—to everyone—that I participate in the discussions of all my reviews. The posted review is never the end of the story, like it is in a magazine. I appreciate constructive feedback but these are things that could be framed as questions as opposed to criticisms of my process. I always have the speakers I review on-hand when I post the review, in case I need to go back and check something, or I missed something, or just to follow up.
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post #24 of 146 Unread 05-27-2015, 08:58 AM
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Sure. Here goes: Without Dirac Live, the sound was not as well-balanced, especially in the bass region... but that's my room's fault as opposed to the speaker's fault.

Very few people have a near-perfect room, nobody has a perfect room. In relative terms, many people have room correction software in their AVRs and pre/pros. 'Nuf said.

If I review speakers without Dirac Live (or other room correction/EQ solutions), I'm really reviewing my room and not the speakers, even though I understand some people think that by using room correction, you are reviewing the software itself and not the speakers. IMO the benefits of using room correction for all of my listening outweigh the minuses, and I can't please everybody.

In future reviews, I'll consider writing about comparing one or two tracks with and then without Dirac Live. But that's not a promise.
Excellent explanation!!!! People fail to realize that there are only 2 components that you actually listen to....the speakers...and the room!!!!

I have owned speakers that I loved - changed my room - then I didn't like them as much. Some speakers need a reflective room (Atmos is a game changer in more ways than one), others prefer a dead room. Seeing that most speakers are measured in anechoic chambers, but we don't live in one, we would definitely need room correction (starting with physical treatments).

I don't have Dirac Live, but I've heard wonderful things about it! I'm actually using a vst plugin via JRiver for my 2 channel and bass correction (MathAudio Room EQ). It actually does a better job on my system than Audyssey MultiEQ (I haven't had the ability to use XT or XT32). I don't see myself listening without EQ ever again.

Keep using Dirac Live when you review - yeah, you can do comparisons with and without - but to know what the speaker really sounds like - we'd need to be at the testing facility.

Carry on and excellent review!
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post #25 of 146 Unread 05-27-2015, 09:40 AM
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Thank you for this review.

I wonder how those compare against the more expensive, but older RF-7...?

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post #26 of 146 Unread 05-27-2015, 09:52 AM - Thread Starter
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Thank you for this review.

I wonder how those compare against the more expensive, but older RF-7...?
I do too, but I've only heard the RF-7II in someone else's home theater, not in my studio. So I cannot compare.

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post #27 of 146 Unread 05-27-2015, 10:11 AM
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Nice review... Nice and technical, which is how us Audiophiles and Klipscheads like it!

Aa paul klipsch said best when it comes to audio claims by many experts:


VPI Classic 2/Soundsmith Aida
Parks Audio Budgie Pre Amp - Budgie SUT - Wyred 4 Sound DAC2 DSDse
Pioneer SC85 - Bel Canto REF 500M
Klipsch Cornwall/Crites/Aletheia Audio - Klipsch RC64II - Klipsch SW115
Samsung PN64D8000 - OPPO BDP93
Klipsch Image Ones - Klipsch x11i
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post #28 of 146 Unread 05-27-2015, 11:32 AM
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Wow! Those are some crazy height speakers mounted to the ceiling!
IanR,
That makes two of us that are curious about those ATMOS overhead speakers.
Perhaps imagic will go beyond teasing, and elaborate ?

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post #29 of 146 Unread 05-27-2015, 12:29 PM - Thread Starter
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Originally Posted by cuzed2 View Post
IanR,
That makes two of us that are curious about those ATMOS overhead speakers.
Perhaps imagic will go beyond teasing, and elaborate ?
Sure. Those are GoldenEar HTR-7000 speakers mounted in the actual enclosures the company used at CEDIA 2014. They are meant to sit in a drop ceiling. I was so impressed with the sound I asked if I could review a similar system, but instead I got my hands on the exact same system. Since I rent, cutting large holes in my ceiling was not an option for implementing Atmos, and I prefer ceiling speakers to the reflected sound approach, although I do have a system (Pioneer Elite) capable of that.

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post #30 of 146 Unread 05-27-2015, 01:41 PM
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Originally Posted by imagic View Post
Here's the graph from Dirac Live. Tons of output at 50 Hz.

That is very likely your room. Do you have a room profile to compare against? I have a similar peak at 50hz.

This is what my room does to an anechoic response

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