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post #38971 of 39059 Old 06-28-2014, 12:50 AM
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Originally Posted by GusGus748s View Post
I wouldn't go 16 gauge. I would recommend 14 guage or 12 guage speaker wire CL2 from monoprice. I would not recommend the monoprice banana plugs at all. They are really cheaply made, and bend easily.
So i should go 14 gauge and buy more expensive banana plugs like sewell silverback? Whats the point?
Recommendations?!?! please and thanks
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post #38972 of 39059 Old 06-28-2014, 01:52 AM
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I've had no problems with the Monoprice banana plugs. I use the screw type with the 12 guage CL2 wire in 3 separate setups.

http://www.monoprice.com/Product?c_i...seq=1&format=2

http://www.monoprice.com/Product?c_i...seq=1&format=2

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So i should go 14 gauge and buy more expensive banana plugs like sewell silverback? Whats the point?
Recommendations?!?! please and thanks
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post #38973 of 39059 Old 06-28-2014, 04:05 AM
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Originally Posted by isaac415 View Post
So i should go 14 gauge and buy more expensive banana plugs like sewell silverback? Whats the point?
Recommendations?!?! please and thanks
Technically you don't need banana plugs at all. Just use cheapest stranded electrical cable for speaker wire. That should save you more $$.

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post #38974 of 39059 Old 06-28-2014, 11:34 AM
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Thanks everyone! I'd love to hear more recommendations!
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post #38975 of 39059 Old 07-03-2014, 11:07 AM
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Found some good information over on the Polk Audio website concerning how to buy the right speakers.

I wouldn't buy their subs though.

Choosing Home Audio Speakers

Why Do I Need All Those Speakers?

Art imitates life. In the real world, we don’t just hear sounds in front of us, but from the back and sides as well. In their attempts to make movies as lifelike as possible, directors duplicate this experience by sending certain sounds to the sides and rear of the audience. For these reasons, modern soundtracks include additional channels that surround audiences with sound. When movies are auditioned through a multi speaker theater array, viewers are placed in the center of the action. That’s why you need all those speakers!
Take a Balanced Approach

Your stereo, center, and surround speakers shouldn’t just sound good, they should all sound the same. Using a technique known as timbre-matching, top manufacturers achieve a consistent character of sound, or timbre, from main to center to surround models, assuring a seamless blend among all channels. Choose a brand that offers a wide range of timbre-matched models. Look at the drivers and tweeters used throughout the system. The tweeters should be the same. The midrange driver cones should be made of the same material, or better yet, the drivers themselves should be identical.
A chain is only as strong as the weakest link. This is as true in home theater systems as it is in many other things. With today’s home theater systems, every speaker in the system has a vital job and must do it well. When selecting home theater speaker components, strive for balanced performance. It makes no sense to overspend on one speaker component and skimp on others.
A description of each speaker in a home theater system, its purpose and how to choose the right one for your style, appears below.

Polk RTiA9
The Stereo Pair (Polk RTiA9)

In addition to playing music, the left and right main channels of a soundtrack carry most of a motion picture’s special effects and orchestral score. In order to excel at these tasks, the stereo pair must encompass wide frequency and broad volume swings (dynamic range), reproduce subtle recorded details, and be able to create a convincing soundstage (the impression of three dimensions).
When choosing main channel loudspeakers, play a handful of music and movie selections you know well. Listen to a solo vocalist:. Does the image of that performer seem to float at the center of the soundstage (good), or can you trace the singer to the speakers (bad)? Next, try an acoustic guitar, violin or cello. You should hear natural, detailed string tone, as well as the resonance of the instrument’s wooden body. Finish with an action flick. Are the effects, gunshots, and explosions clearly reproduced, or do they become hard, flat and generally unpleasant as the volume increases? A good pair of loudspeakers should NEVER sound fatiguing.

Polk CSiA6
The Center Channel Speaker (Polk CSiA6)

Although the main purpose of a center speaker is to fix the actors’ voices to the screen for off-center listeners, this channel also carries a good deal of the movie’s special effects. In fact, more than 50% of a typical film’s sound is routed to the center, and the speaker must be able to produce very high volumes without distortion or strain. So don’t skimp! Audition a scene in which several actors speak. Is each voice unique and articulate? Male vocals should be deep, but never boomy or chesty (emphasizing the deep chest sounds in spoken or singing voice). Higher pitched women’s voices shouldn’t sound shrill, spitty, or nasal. Finally, try a scene in which special effects pan from left to right; a car chase is ideal. Does the sound remain consistent, or does it become weak or lightweight as it passes through the center?
For a single listener sitting in the sweet spot (equidistant from both speakers), a center channel speaker is sometimes not even necessary. Simply engage the phantom center control on your processor or receiver, and you’ll hear a clearly localized central image. Of course, if you’d like to share the fun with friends or family, a good center channel speaker is a necessity.
Do you need a center channel speaker with good bass performance? For most systems, the answer is no. All surround receivers and processors have bass management for the center speaker. They allow you to direct the center channel bass information into the main or subwoofer channels. Your processor’s instruction manual will show you how to do it. The center speaker needs to reproduce sounds only from 100 Hz and up.
If you want the ultimate home theater performance, there are a few center speakers that can reproduce bass with authority, including a couple that even have built-in powered subwoofers. If your main speakers are ultra-high performance, you’ll appreciate the added dynamic range, kick, and imaging precision that a full range center speaker brings to the party.

Polk F/XiA6
The Surround Speakers (Polk F/XiA6)

The next time you’re in a movie theater, look around. See all those speakers lining the side and rear walls? They help the soundtrack encircle the audience. It’s this surround effect that places viewers in the center of the action. Since it’s impractical for homeowners to install multiple pairs of effects channel loudspeakers, manufacturers offer bi-directional (bipole or dipole) speakers, which place drivers on both the front and rear of the cabinet. This arrangement spreads the sound along the side walls, making it harder for the audience to identify the location of the surround speakers and delivering a more enveloping experience. This is especially important if the surround speakers need to be placed within a few feet of your listening position.
But bi-directional surrounds are not for everyone. With 5.1 channel systems, your rear speakers need to reproduce the same high frequency range as your front speakers and bass as low as 80 Hz, minimum. You’ll probably be happier with high performance front firing speakers than with a pair of cheap or mediocre bipoles or dipoles. Frankly, bi-directional speakers selling for less than $400/pair are not a wise choice.
To choose the surround speakers that are best for you, first select a location and the type of speakers (floor, on-wall, in-wall, etc.) that fit well in your room.
If you have or are planning on getting a Dolby Digital decoding system, select surround speakers that are as close as possible in performance to your front speakers. Look for the same or similar driver and tweeters as your front speakers. Pick speakers made by the same manufacturer as your main speakers.
In-wall or in-ceiling speakers are an attractive option for surround channel use. They can offer high performance and take up no space at all.

Polk DSWPRO600
The Subwoofer (Polk DSWPRO600)

As we said before, a powered subwoofer is a speaker that reproduces only the lowest (bass) frequencies to provide a more exciting and lifelike movie experience. Since it has its own built-in amplifier, you don’t need to be concerned about whether your receiver or amp has enough power to drive a powered subwoofer.
A highly recommended option for stereo listening, subwoofers are an essential component of 5.1 channel digital systems since these formats assign additional low frequency effects to a separate subwoofer track. If you’ve chosen powered towers for your stereo pair, their built-in subs may make this sixth speaker unnecessary. If you’re looking to assemble a truly outrageous home theater system, adding a separate subwoofer to a set of powered towers will deliver an effortless, body moving experience.
There are a few things to keep in mind when selecting a powered subwoofer for your system. First, select a location for your subwoofer and measure the space to see what fits. Subwoofers generally perform best when placed near walls.
Next, the better your front main speakers, the better the subwoofer needs to be. If you have floorstanding speakers that already have good bass, select a subwoofer that is capable of reproducing very low frequencies so that it produces the bass that your main speakers cannot reproduce efficiently. A small, inexpensive subwoofer added to a pair of large, high quality floorstanding speakers may do more harm than good.
The size of your room is also a factor. The bigger the room you want to fill, the better the subwoofer you’ll need. Any open areas such as high ceilings or open walls are all seen by the subwoofer, even if you don’t listen in that area. Any airspace above suspended ceilings is also included. Thus the larger the room, the more powerful subwoofer you need.
What material is to be played through the system? Action/adventure movies have significantly more bass requirements then talk shows, news or comedies.
Ultimately how much bass you’re looking for in the system. If you want to rattle the walls and feel chest collapsing bass, one or more powerful subwoofers is recommended.
But the best advice of all is to ignore the numbers and simply listen before you buy. Many people get hung up on inches and watts. They assume that the bigger the driver size and the higher the power amp rating, the better the subwoofer. This is simply not so. Bigger doesn’t necessarily make better.
Here is where CEA2010 numbers come into play by giving real world acoustic output, or a loud and low rating instead of inches and watts.
Your dealer can let you listen to different subwoofers before you buy. If possible, listen with the front speakers you own or intend to get. Does the subwoofer add a deep bass foundation, or does it just boom? Listen with music as well as movie sources. Is the subwoofer tight and well defined with music, or does it just add a vague rumble? Trust your ears. Just keep in mind the dealer showroom acoustics can differ significantly then your home.
Tire Kicking - How to Judge a Quality Speaker

Although listening is the ultimate test of a loudspeaker, there are other clues to quality. Rap your knuckles on the sides of the cabinet: a hollow thud indicates a poorly made enclosure that will probably degrade the sound. The weight of a speaker will give you a clue as to the materials and construction quality. The best speakers have 5-way binding posts that offer the best possible connection with any type of cable.
Read the manufacturer’s specifications to make sure your amplifier and speakers will work properly together. The efficiency (a.k.a. sensitivity) rating tells you how much sound a speaker will produce when fed one watt of power. Choose a model rated at 86 dB or higher-a low-powered system needs high efficiency speakers. Finally, check the “impedance” specification. If you’ve chosen an inexpensive receiver, your speakers’ impedance should be at least 4-Ohms, and preferably 6-Ohms or higher.
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Onkyo TX-NR3009 - Emotiva XPA-2 300 WPC - Polk Audio RTiA9 Mains - CSiA6 Center - F/XiA6 Surrounds - Dual PSA XV-15se Subwoofers - Samsung UN55C8000 3D LED TV - Samsung BD-F5900 3D Bluray - WDTV Live HD Media Player with 6TB External Storage - Nintendo Wii - XBox 360 - Logitech Harmony One...
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post #38976 of 39059 Old 07-03-2014, 05:43 PM
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When will polk have an updated line up to include Atmos speakers? I want an a9 with a a6 mounted on top of it!
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post #38977 of 39059 Old 07-03-2014, 06:43 PM
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Quote:
Originally Posted by PretzelFisch View Post
When will polk have an updated line up to include Atmos speakers? I want an a9 with a a6 mounted on top of it!
True. Now they're going to have to update their lineup with in-ceiling mounted speakers that are timbre-matched to each speaker series.

Onkyo TX-NR3009 - Emotiva XPA-2 300 WPC - Polk Audio RTiA9 Mains - CSiA6 Center - F/XiA6 Surrounds - Dual PSA XV-15se Subwoofers - Samsung UN55C8000 3D LED TV - Samsung BD-F5900 3D Bluray - WDTV Live HD Media Player with 6TB External Storage - Nintendo Wii - XBox 360 - Logitech Harmony One...
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post #38978 of 39059 Old 07-03-2014, 06:48 PM
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Originally Posted by climber07 View Post
True. Now they're going to have to update their lineup with in-ceiling mounted speakers that are timbre-matched to each speaker series.
http://www.polkaudio.com/products/ho...ter/in-ceiling

They already do .. i've already looked into the 90-rt and 70-rt for in-ceiling atmos speakers.. ..

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post #38979 of 39059 Old 07-03-2014, 08:45 PM
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Originally Posted by xFreshEntrailsX View Post
http://www.polkaudio.com/products/ho...ter/in-ceiling

They already do .. i've already looked into the 90-rt and 70-rt for in-ceiling atmos speakers.. ..
the atmos coming to consumer avr's is not designed for ceiling but a speaker attached to you FS amid at the ceiling. which is something pioneer anounced.
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post #38980 of 39059 Old 07-03-2014, 08:55 PM
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Originally Posted by PretzelFisch View Post
the atmos coming to consumer avr's is not designed for ceiling but a speaker attached to you FS amid at the ceiling. which is something pioneer anounced.
Atmos implementation in consumer AVR's are designed specifically for in ceiling speakers. Reflecting floor standing speakers are a compromise in performance for those who can't accommodate in-ceiling speakers. Whoever told you that was more than a little off base.
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post #38981 of 39059 Old 07-04-2014, 10:30 AM
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Originally Posted by PretzelFisch View Post
the atmos coming to consumer avr's is not designed for ceiling but a speaker attached to you FS amid at the ceiling. which is something pioneer anounced.
Those speakers are going to be the budget style atmos compromise.. alot like sound bars.. designed to "reflect" the sound to give the impression of surround

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Originally Posted by Tom Grooms View Post
Atmos implementation in consumer AVR's are designed specifically for in ceiling speakers. Reflecting floor standing speakers are a compromise in performance for those who can't accommodate in-ceiling speakers. Whoever told you that was more than a little off base.
Exactly.. http://www.audioholics.com/audio-tec...me-theater-101 .. this helped me understand it a bit better

Onkyo TX-NR929, QSC GX5, Polk Audio RtiA9's, CsiA6, F/XiA6's, RtiA3's, Dual PSA XV-15's, Xbox 360, PS3, hopper w/Sling, Samsung 55" LED, All controlled with a Harmony One
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post #38982 of 39059 Old 07-04-2014, 12:33 PM
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POlk RTi 12 - Help

Hi All, not a polky yet however hoping I can get some help here.

Am suffering from Upgraditis...maybe...maybe not.

Current Setup (newbie)
Yamaha v675
Studio 190 - Front L and R
ES80 - Rear L and R
Studio 120c - Center
PL 200

In pursuit of the blow my mind away feeling...I am looking to lift the fronts further. Looked up Polk RTi12 and 75T. Spent the morning reading up of what I would call mixed reviews, some of which were outright awesome.

Can someone advise of the advantages of replacing Studio 190s with either of the above two?

Whats the audible difference between RTi12 and 75T anyway?

Is my receiver enough to run these speakers?
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post #38983 of 39059 Old 07-04-2014, 01:04 PM
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Polk RTi12 speakers are power hungry and your receiver is definitely not the most recommended to power the 12s. The 75T is a more easy to drive speaker but it's not at the same level in terms of SQ of the RTi12. If you want to get the RTi12 I would strongly recommend to get a receiver with pre outs (Yamaha V775) so you can add an external amp to drive the 12s.

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post #38984 of 39059 Old 07-04-2014, 02:12 PM
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Kamekazi View Post
Hi All, not a polky yet however hoping I can get some help here.

Am suffering from Upgraditis...maybe...maybe not.

Current Setup (newbie)
Yamaha v675
Studio 190 - Front L and R
ES80 - Rear L and R
Studio 120c - Center
PL 200

In pursuit of the blow my mind away feeling...I am looking to lift the fronts further. Looked up Polk RTi12 and 75T. Spent the morning reading up of what I would call mixed reviews, some of which were outright awesome.

Can someone advise of the advantages of replacing Studio 190s with either of the above two?

Whats the audible difference between RTi12 and 75T anyway?

Is my receiver enough to run these speakers?
If you like the sound of the jbl maybe you should look at their higher end. when you change brands there can be a lot of difference you might not like. if you want polk and to keep the current avr, try the rti/a6w with a good subwoofer like rythmik lvr12
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post #38985 of 39059 Old 07-06-2014, 10:23 AM
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Yes, I am an atmos lover and owner. I have a 22.9 system comprised of all A9's. Recessing them in the ceiling and walls was no easy task, but alas, victory achieved! And the sound, incredible just doesn't say it!!!


Oh, I didn't stop at the ceiling and walls, I have A9's recessed in the floor as well. I have sound radiating at me from 360d x 2. And yes, I'm the first kid on my block to have this set up!!


Quote:
Originally Posted by climber07 View Post
Found some good information over on the Polk Audio website concerning how to buy the right speakers.

I wouldn't buy their subs though.

Choosing Home Audio Speakers

Why Do I Need All Those Speakers?

Art imitates life. In the real world, we don’t just hear sounds in front of us, but from the back and sides as well. In their attempts to make movies as lifelike as possible, directors duplicate this experience by sending certain sounds to the sides and rear of the audience. For these reasons, modern soundtracks include additional channels that surround audiences with sound. When movies are auditioned through a multi speaker theater array, viewers are placed in the center of the action. That’s why you need all those speakers!
Take a Balanced Approach

Your stereo, center, and surround speakers shouldn’t just sound good, they should all sound the same. Using a technique known as timbre-matching, top manufacturers achieve a consistent character of sound, or timbre, from main to center to surround models, assuring a seamless blend among all channels. Choose a brand that offers a wide range of timbre-matched models. Look at the drivers and tweeters used throughout the system. The tweeters should be the same. The midrange driver cones should be made of the same material, or better yet, the drivers themselves should be identical.
A chain is only as strong as the weakest link. This is as true in home theater systems as it is in many other things. With today’s home theater systems, every speaker in the system has a vital job and must do it well. When selecting home theater speaker components, strive for balanced performance. It makes no sense to overspend on one speaker component and skimp on others.
A description of each speaker in a home theater system, its purpose and how to choose the right one for your style, appears below.



Polk RTiA9
The Stereo Pair (Polk RTiA9)

In addition to playing music, the left and right main channels of a soundtrack carry most of a motion picture’s special effects and orchestral score. In order to excel at these tasks, the stereo pair must encompass wide frequency and broad volume swings (dynamic range), reproduce subtle recorded details, and be able to create a convincing soundstage (the impression of three dimensions).
When choosing main channel loudspeakers, play a handful of music and movie selections you know well. Listen to a solo vocalist:. Does the image of that performer seem to float at the center of the soundstage (good), or can you trace the singer to the speakers (bad)? Next, try an acoustic guitar, violin or cello. You should hear natural, detailed string tone, as well as the resonance of the instrument’s wooden body. Finish with an action flick. Are the effects, gunshots, and explosions clearly reproduced, or do they become hard, flat and generally unpleasant as the volume increases? A good pair of loudspeakers should NEVER sound fatiguing.



Polk CSiA6
The Center Channel Speaker (Polk CSiA6)

Although the main purpose of a center speaker is to fix the actors’ voices to the screen for off-center listeners, this channel also carries a good deal of the movie’s special effects. In fact, more than 50% of a typical film’s sound is routed to the center, and the speaker must be able to produce very high volumes without distortion or strain. So don’t skimp! Audition a scene in which several actors speak. Is each voice unique and articulate? Male vocals should be deep, but never boomy or chesty (emphasizing the deep chest sounds in spoken or singing voice). Higher pitched women’s voices shouldn’t sound shrill, spitty, or nasal. Finally, try a scene in which special effects pan from left to right; a car chase is ideal. Does the sound remain consistent, or does it become weak or lightweight as it passes through the center?
For a single listener sitting in the sweet spot (equidistant from both speakers), a center channel speaker is sometimes not even necessary. Simply engage the phantom center control on your processor or receiver, and you’ll hear a clearly localized central image. Of course, if you’d like to share the fun with friends or family, a good center channel speaker is a necessity.
Do you need a center channel speaker with good bass performance? For most systems, the answer is no. All surround receivers and processors have bass management for the center speaker. They allow you to direct the center channel bass information into the main or subwoofer channels. Your processor’s instruction manual will show you how to do it. The center speaker needs to reproduce sounds only from 100 Hz and up.
If you want the ultimate home theater performance, there are a few center speakers that can reproduce bass with authority, including a couple that even have built-in powered subwoofers. If your main speakers are ultra-high performance, you’ll appreciate the added dynamic range, kick, and imaging precision that a full range center speaker brings to the party.



Polk F/XiA6
The Surround Speakers (Polk F/XiA6)

The next time you’re in a movie theater, look around. See all those speakers lining the side and rear walls? They help the soundtrack encircle the audience. It’s this surround effect that places viewers in the center of the action. Since it’s impractical for homeowners to install multiple pairs of effects channel loudspeakers, manufacturers offer bi-directional (bipole or dipole) speakers, which place drivers on both the front and rear of the cabinet. This arrangement spreads the sound along the side walls, making it harder for the audience to identify the location of the surround speakers and delivering a more enveloping experience. This is especially important if the surround speakers need to be placed within a few feet of your listening position.
But bi-directional surrounds are not for everyone. With 5.1 channel systems, your rear speakers need to reproduce the same high frequency range as your front speakers and bass as low as 80 Hz, minimum. You’ll probably be happier with high performance front firing speakers than with a pair of cheap or mediocre bipoles or dipoles. Frankly, bi-directional speakers selling for less than $400/pair are not a wise choice.
To choose the surround speakers that are best for you, first select a location and the type of speakers (floor, on-wall, in-wall, etc.) that fit well in your room.
If you have or are planning on getting a Dolby Digital decoding system, select surround speakers that are as close as possible in performance to your front speakers. Look for the same or similar driver and tweeters as your front speakers. Pick speakers made by the same manufacturer as your main speakers.
In-wall or in-ceiling speakers are an attractive option for surround channel use. They can offer high performance and take up no space at all.



Polk DSWPRO600
The Subwoofer (Polk DSWPRO600)

As we said before, a powered subwoofer is a speaker that reproduces only the lowest (bass) frequencies to provide a more exciting and lifelike movie experience. Since it has its own built-in amplifier, you don’t need to be concerned about whether your receiver or amp has enough power to drive a powered subwoofer.
A highly recommended option for stereo listening, subwoofers are an essential component of 5.1 channel digital systems since these formats assign additional low frequency effects to a separate subwoofer track. If you’ve chosen powered towers for your stereo pair, their built-in subs may make this sixth speaker unnecessary. If you’re looking to assemble a truly outrageous home theater system, adding a separate subwoofer to a set of powered towers will deliver an effortless, body moving experience.
There are a few things to keep in mind when selecting a powered subwoofer for your system. First, select a location for your subwoofer and measure the space to see what fits. Subwoofers generally perform best when placed near walls.
Next, the better your front main speakers, the better the subwoofer needs to be. If you have floorstanding speakers that already have good bass, select a subwoofer that is capable of reproducing very low frequencies so that it produces the bass that your main speakers cannot reproduce efficiently. A small, inexpensive subwoofer added to a pair of large, high quality floorstanding speakers may do more harm than good.
The size of your room is also a factor. The bigger the room you want to fill, the better the subwoofer you’ll need. Any open areas such as high ceilings or open walls are all seen by the subwoofer, even if you don’t listen in that area. Any airspace above suspended ceilings is also included. Thus the larger the room, the more powerful subwoofer you need.
What material is to be played through the system? Action/adventure movies have significantly more bass requirements then talk shows, news or comedies.
Ultimately how much bass you’re looking for in the system. If you want to rattle the walls and feel chest collapsing bass, one or more powerful subwoofers is recommended.
But the best advice of all is to ignore the numbers and simply listen before you buy. Many people get hung up on inches and watts. They assume that the bigger the driver size and the higher the power amp rating, the better the subwoofer. This is simply not so. Bigger doesn’t necessarily make better.
Here is where CEA2010 numbers come into play by giving real world acoustic output, or a loud and low rating instead of inches and watts.
Your dealer can let you listen to different subwoofers before you buy. If possible, listen with the front speakers you own or intend to get. Does the subwoofer add a deep bass foundation, or does it just boom? Listen with music as well as movie sources. Is the subwoofer tight and well defined with music, or does it just add a vague rumble? Trust your ears. Just keep in mind the dealer showroom acoustics can differ significantly then your home.
Tire Kicking - How to Judge a Quality Speaker

Although listening is the ultimate test of a loudspeaker, there are other clues to quality. Rap your knuckles on the sides of the cabinet: a hollow thud indicates a poorly made enclosure that will probably degrade the sound. The weight of a speaker will give you a clue as to the materials and construction quality. The best speakers have 5-way binding posts that offer the best possible connection with any type of cable.
Read the manufacturer’s specifications to make sure your amplifier and speakers will work properly together. The efficiency (a.k.a. sensitivity) rating tells you how much sound a speaker will produce when fed one watt of power. Choose a model rated at 86 dB or higher-a low-powered system needs high efficiency speakers. Finally, check the “impedance” specification. If you’ve chosen an inexpensive receiver, your speakers’ impedance should be at least 4-Ohms, and preferably 6-Ohms or higher.
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Originally Posted by PretzelFisch View Post
When will polk have an updated line up to include Atmos speakers? I want an a9 with a a6 mounted on top of it!
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Originally Posted by climber07 View Post
True. Now they're going to have to update their lineup with in-ceiling mounted speakers that are timbre-matched to each speaker series.
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Originally Posted by xFreshEntrailsX View Post
http://www.polkaudio.com/products/ho...ter/in-ceiling

They already do .. i've already looked into the 90-rt and 70-rt for in-ceiling atmos speakers.. ..
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the atmos coming to consumer avr's is not designed for ceiling but a speaker attached to you FS amid at the ceiling. which is something pioneer anounced.
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post #38986 of 39059 Old 07-06-2014, 10:50 AM
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Yes, I am an atmos lover and owner. I have a 22.9 system comprised of all A9's. Recessing them in the ceiling and walls was no easy task, but alas, victory achieved! And the sound, incredible just doesn't say it!!!


Oh, I didn't stop at the ceiling and walls, I have A9's recessed in the floor as well. I have sound radiating at me from 360d x 2. And yes, I'm the first kid on my block to have this set up!!
you must be powering it all with a forty watt tube amp, there is just no substitute in terms of sq.
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post #38987 of 39059 Old 07-06-2014, 08:04 PM
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hey guys i need some advice im going for a 9.2 setup and i have 2 pairs of fxi a4"s, rti a9 and csi a6 but idk if i should buy a pair of fxi a6's for the heights or get the fxi a4 like the others also im going to purchase emotiva xpa 5 for the center and towers if i get the fxi a6 i will run then through the amotiva also.
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hey guys i need some advice im going for a 9.2 setup and i have 2 pairs of fxi a4"s, rti a9 and csi a6 but idk if i should buy a pair of fxi a6's for the heights or get the fxi a4 like the others also im going to purchase emotiva xpa 5 for the center and towers if i get the fxi a6 i will run then through the amotiva also.
Heights or wides need to be bookshelves, so you want the A1 or A3's. A bipole/dipole as heights would mess up the soundstage considerably.

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post #38989 of 39059 Old 07-06-2014, 08:52 PM
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Quote:
Originally Posted by akilsterling View Post
hey guys i need some advice im going for a 9.2 setup and i have 2 pairs of fxi a4"s, rti a9 and csi a6 but idk if i should buy a pair of fxi a6's for the heights or get the fxi a4 like the others also im going to purchase emotiva xpa 5 for the center and towers if i get the fxi a6 i will run then through the amotiva also.
Bipole/dipole speakers are not designed for heights or wides. You would be better getting either A1s or A3s. If size is an issue then the TL2 is another option for heights and it's timbre matched with RTi A series.

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thanks for the advice guys but im seeing alot of people using Bipole/dipole speakers for front and wides and its working how is this if you dont mind me asking
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post #38991 of 39059 Old 07-06-2014, 10:41 PM
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thanks for the advice guys but im seeing alot of people using Bipole/dipole speakers for front and wides and its working how is this if you dont mind me asking
Heights and widess are directional front stage audio tracks, when they are encoded separately. Bipole/dipole speakers are specifically designed for surrounds. If you need specifics and proof, Audyssey, THX, and Polk Audio give the same advice. Never use dipole speakers for front height or wide. They must be direct radiators.

Just because you see people using them doesn't mean they know what they are doing. I know a lot of people who think Bose is the best quality sound you can get... If you get my meaning.
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post #38992 of 39059 Old 07-06-2014, 11:26 PM
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Originally Posted by climber07 View Post
Heights and widess are directional front stage audio tracks, when they are encoded separately. Bipole/dipole speakers are specifically designed for surrounds. If you need specifics and proof, Audyssey, THX, and Polk Audio give the same advice. Never use dipole speakers for front height or wide. They must be direct radiators.

Just because you see people using them doesn't mean they know what they are doing. I know a lot of people who think Bose is the best quality sound you can get... If you get my meaning.

I agree that the di/bi's won't hold a candle to towers or bookies at wide, but what about heights? Check out this speaker and what it was made for; http://www.gspr.com/atlantic/1400z.html

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post #38993 of 39059 Old 07-06-2014, 11:40 PM
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The reason I challenge this issue on the height speaker is; I've used wides, heights and rears, along with the other five.


Heights and rears has seen me using bookshelves from satellites to M40's. The sound was "okay". I've since aborted the height configuration, and currently using a tower in the rear, what a difference it makes over the bookie....way more sound. So in this application, more speaker, more sound.


For surround, I've used bookies and towers, lots of sound, but when I used the bi/di, I got even more sound, contributed to the double tweeter. My rears will eventually change to the di/bi as well.


This all said, wouldn't it stand true, that for overhead ambient sound, a double tweeter would provide more sound?


According to Polk, the setting for surround recommends Dipole, as for the rear, they recommend Bipole, couldn't it stand to reason that the height could also be set to Bipole and have a similar dispersion of sound since proper placement would be outside the mains 45 degrees from the center channel?
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post #38994 of 39059 Old 07-07-2014, 03:44 AM
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With Dolby Atmos knocking on the door, I'd recommend you seriously consider in-ceiling height speakers and scrap the front height/wide configuration all together.

$0.02
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post #38995 of 39059 Old 07-07-2014, 09:55 AM
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Quote:
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With Dolby Atmos knocking on the door, I'd recommend you seriously consider in-ceiling height speakers and scrap the front height/wide configuration all together.

$0.02
Do you not think dolby will provide a 11.2.4 configuration? Atmos in theater is like 64 speakers? It stands to reason the more speakers you can put into your theater the better your sound stage will be.
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Here the link for The official Dolby Atmos thread (home theater version)

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Enrico Castagnetti
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post #38997 of 39059 Old 07-07-2014, 11:04 AM
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Geoff4RFC View Post
The reason I challenge this issue on the height speaker is; I've used wides, heights and rears, along with the other five.


Heights and rears has seen me using bookshelves from satellites to M40's. The sound was "okay". I've since aborted the height configuration, and currently using a tower in the rear, what a difference it makes over the bookie....way more sound. So in this application, more speaker, more sound.


For surround, I've used bookies and towers, lots of sound, but when I used the bi/di, I got even more sound, contributed to the double tweeter. My rears will eventually change to the di/bi as well.


This all said, wouldn't it stand true, that for overhead ambient sound, a double tweeter would provide more sound?


According to Polk, the setting for surround recommends Dipole, as for the rear, they recommend Bipole, couldn't it stand to reason that the height could also be set to Bipole and have a similar dispersion of sound since proper placement would be outside the mains 45 degrees from the center channel?
The recommendation for height speakers is monopole speakers located 45 degrees up from the listening position pointed down toward the listening position no closer together than the main speakers.
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post #38998 of 39059 Old 07-07-2014, 12:44 PM
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Do you not think dolby will provide a 11.2.4 configuration? Atmos in theater is like 64 speakers? It stands to reason the more speakers you can put into your theater the better your sound stage will be.
I honestly think that 5.2.4 or 7.2.4 will be just about all a home theater needs. When you start adding more speakers than that, you are getting into the professional range. I don't think manufacturers of home AVRs are going to go much further than what the average user will employ, speaker wise, in their home for a given price range of AVR. You have to remember that the connections for the overhead speakers are taking up valuable AVR rear panel space, power supply current, and amplifier power.

I think pre-pros will be able to offer more connections (e.g. 9.2.4 and 11.2.4).

Onkyo is set to release Atmos products as well. Not that I would use their speakers. I'd probably go with Polk in-ceiling speakers.

  • Dolby Atmos Compatible Onkyo Products





    Network A/V Receivers & Controllers









    TX-NR3030




    11.2 Channel THX Certified Network A/V Receiver



    Dolby Atmos Built-In



    • Built-in New Dolby Atmos Surround Format
    • THX Select2 Plus Certified for Theater-Reference Sound Quality
    • Three Separate Transformers for Amp, Audio, and Video Processing
    • 135 W/ch
    • HDMI 2.0 Terminals for Ultra HD Entertainment
    • Supports HDCP 2.2
    • 3 x HDMI Outputs Including Zone 2 HDMI
    • Built-in Wi-Fi® Certified Wireless LAN Capability









    TX-NR1030




    9.2 Channel THX Certified Network A/V Receiver



    Dolby Atmos Built-In



    • Built-in New Dolby Atmos Surround Format
    • THX Select2 Plus Certified for Theater-Reference Sound Quality
    • Separate Processing and Amplification Block Construction
    • 135 W/ch
    • HDMI 2.0 Terminals for Ultra HD Entertainment
    • Supports HDCP 2.2
    • 3 x HDMI Outputs Including Zone 2 HDMI
    • Built-in Wi-Fi® Certified Wireless LAN Capability








    PR-SC5530




    11.2 Channel THX Certified Network A/V Controller



    Dolby Atmos Built-In



    • Built-in New Dolby Atmos Surround Format
    • THX Select2 Plus Certified for Theater-Reference Sound Quality
    • Massive Toroidal Transformer and Two Separate Transformers for Audio and Video Processing
    • HDMI 2.0 Terminals for Ultra HD Entertainment
    • Supports HDCP 2.2
    • 3 x HDMI Outputs Including Zone 2 HDMI
    • Built-in Wi-Fi® Certified Wireless LAN Capability








    TX-NR838




    7.2 Channel THX Certified Network A/V Receiver



    Dolby Atmos Firmware Upgradable



    • Dolby Atmos Surround Format: Ready to Upgrade
    • THX Select2 Plus Certified for Theater-Reference Sound Quality
    • WRAT (Wide Range Amplifier Technology) Custom Audio Parts
    • 130 W/ch
    • HDMI 2.0 Terminals for Ultra HD Entertainment
    • Supports HDCP 2.2
    • Built-in Wi-Fi® Certified Wireless LAN Capability








    TX-NR737




    7.2 Channel THX Certified Network A/V Receiver



    Dolby Atmos Firmware Upgradable



    • Dolby Atmos Surround Format: Ready to Upgrade
    • THX Select2 Plus Certified for Theater-Reference Sound Quality
    • WRAT (Wide Range Amplifier Technology) Custom Audio Parts
    • 110 W/ch
    • HDMI 2.0 Terminals for Ultra HD Entertainment
    • Supports HDCP 2.2
    • Built-in Wi-Fi® Certified Wireless LAN Capability








    TX-NR636




    7.2 Channel Network A/V Receiver



    Dolby Atmos Firmware Upgradable



    • Dolby Atmos Surround Format: Ready to Upgrade
    • WRAT (Wide Range Amplifier Technology) Custom Audio Parts
    • 95 W/ch
    • HDMI 2.0 Terminals for Ultra HD Entertainment
    • Supports HDCP 2.2
    • Built-in Wi-Fi® Certified Wireless LAN Capability






  • Dolby Atmos Compatible Onkyo Products





    Speakers & HTiB Systems









    HT-S9700THX




    7.1- Channel THX Certified Integrated System



    THX Certified Network A/V Receiver with Dolby Atmos Built-In
    7.1 Speaker Package



    Dolby Atmos-Enabled speakers not included. Two Back Channels can be used as Height.








    HT-S7700




    5.1.2- Channel Integrated System



    Network A/V Receiver with Dolby Atmos Built-In
    Dolby Atmos-Enabled Front Speakers









    SKS-HT693




    5.1.2- Channel Home Theater Speaker Package



    Includes Dolby Atmos-Enabled Front Speakers









    SKH-410




    .2- Channel Speaker Modules



    Dolby Atmos-Enabled Add-On Speaker Modules
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Onkyo TX-NR3009 - Emotiva XPA-2 300 WPC - Polk Audio RTiA9 Mains - CSiA6 Center - F/XiA6 Surrounds - Dual PSA XV-15se Subwoofers - Samsung UN55C8000 3D LED TV - Samsung BD-F5900 3D Bluray - WDTV Live HD Media Player with 6TB External Storage - Nintendo Wii - XBox 360 - Logitech Harmony One...

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post #38999 of 39059 Old 07-08-2014, 07:10 PM
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Hey Polkies. Question for you all about the possibility of getting some bookshelf speakers to mount for my projection screen room. I'm debating between going with a pair of RTi4 ($75) or RTi6 ($125). I have a Bic F12 subwoofer so I tend to crossover my speakers at about 80-90hz. The room is mostly for HT, but some music listening as well. Is there any benefit of going with the RTi6 if I have a subwoofer? Aren't I only missing out on some lower frequencies that the sub will cover anyways?

Any help regarding this would be very helpful. Thanks!
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post #39000 of 39059 Old 07-08-2014, 07:26 PM
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Hey Polkies. Question for you all about the possibility of getting some bookshelf speakers to mount for my projection screen room. I'm debating between going with a pair of RTi4 ($75) or RTi6 ($125). I have a Bic F12 subwoofer so I tend to crossover my speakers at about 80-90hz. The room is mostly for HT, but some music listening as well. Is there any benefit of going with the RTi6 if I have a subwoofer? Aren't I only missing out on some lower frequencies that the sub will cover anyways?

Any help regarding this would be very helpful. Thanks!
for the front go large, most sound comes from them.
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