Legacy Audio Speakers - Page 18 - AVS | Home Theater Discussions And Reviews
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post #511 of 514 Old 03-23-2015, 01:40 PM
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Originally Posted by dado73 View Post
Hi Max,

what do you mean when you say "if you just don't happen to like this particular speaker's frequency response" ?
If the measured speaker's response will result correct (flat) you may think that I have some hearing problems... But I have heard other prestigious speakers that sound great to me (for example B&W 802D). I think that nonlinear effects in the response to transients will make a great difference between different speakers, a difference that could be not detected with a simple frequency response test.

Anyway I will try to arrange for a serious frequency response test...

Davide
Davide,

I meant that different speaker manufacturers design their speakers with different Frequency Response patterns.

Many speakers, when placed in an average sized room with little to no acoustic treatment produce a descending FR, so the lowest octaves are typically anywhere from 10db to 20db higher/louder than the highest octaves/frequencies.

In addition, depending on the type of tweeter used, a graph of the speaker's FR may also show a greater downward curve above 12kHz-16kHz, in which case, 16kHz may be more than 20db lower than 30Hz.

Legacy Audio speakers tend to produce a flatter frequency response all the way out to 20kHz, so the highest frequencies are almost as high in measured db as the lowest frequencies.

If you're used to a descending FR, you might find the Legacy Audio speakers to be too 'bright'.

The speakers I previously had produced a descending response with a measured 15db drop in my room from 30Hz to 20kHz. I prefer this response for a lot of music.

The Focus SEs that I have are great for movies and HT though, where they're calibrated for a flat in-room response (which happens to be very close to their natural non-EQ'ed in-room FR) to reproduce THX Reference.


Max
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post #512 of 514 Old 03-24-2015, 03:19 AM
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Originally Posted by djbluemax1 View Post
Davide,

I meant that different speaker manufacturers design their speakers with different Frequency Response patterns.

Many speakers, when placed in an average sized room with little to no acoustic treatment produce a descending FR, so the lowest octaves are typically anywhere from 10db to 20db higher/louder than the highest octaves/frequencies.

In addition, depending on the type of tweeter used, a graph of the speaker's FR may also show a greater downward curve above 12kHz-16kHz, in which case, 16kHz may be more than 20db lower than 30Hz.

Legacy Audio speakers tend to produce a flatter frequency response all the way out to 20kHz, so the highest frequencies are almost as high in measured db as the lowest frequencies.

If you're used to a descending FR, you might find the Legacy Audio speakers to be too 'bright'.

The speakers I previously had produced a descending response with a measured 15db drop in my room from 30Hz to 20kHz. I prefer this response for a lot of music.

The Focus SEs that I have are great for movies and HT though, where they're calibrated for a flat in-room response (which happens to be very close to their natural non-EQ'ed in-room FR) to reproduce THX Reference.


Max
So you mean that a flat response speaker (like your Focus SEs) is more suitable for movies and HT rather than music ?

If yes, that could be the reason why I feel the problem. I could easily ask the dealer for a change, but only if I will get another Legacy speaker: what about the Calssic HD or the Signature SE ?
Otherwise I will have to sell them and look for another brand: in that case I would appreciate any suggestion from you, staying on the quality level of Legacy.

Thnx
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post #513 of 514 Old 03-24-2015, 06:26 PM
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Originally Posted by dado73 View Post
So you mean that a flat response speaker (like your Focus SEs) is more suitable for movies and HT rather than music ?

If yes, that could be the reason why I feel the problem. I could easily ask the dealer for a change, but only if I will get another Legacy speaker: what about the Calssic HD or the Signature SE ?
Otherwise I will have to sell them and look for another brand: in that case I would appreciate any suggestion from you, staying on the quality level of Legacy.

Thnx
It's not that the Focus SE's flatter FR make them better for HT than music per se, but calibrating for THX Reference for HT produces a flat response, so a speaker with a natively flat in-room response (and higher sensitivity and power handling) make it a good option.

When it comes to music on the other hand, some listeners prefer a tilted/descending FR and others prefer a flatter FR so it's more of a personal preference (I tend to prefer a descending/tilted response for music).


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post #514 of 514 Old 04-06-2015, 04:33 PM
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Originally Posted by dado73 View Post
So you mean that a flat response speaker (like your Focus SEs) is more suitable for movies and HT rather than music ?
Bit late here, but I've been reading a lot lately on "house curves" and happen to come across this thread. My setup is all Legacy, with Whisper XDS fronts. After owning them for about 6 months I finally got interesting in experimenting with the supplied processor. Prior to that, I had a technician set up the processor. When I first took measurements I noticed a downward sloping FR. Thinking that flat was ideal, I EQed to get it pretty flat. After listening, I was shocked by how badly it sounded. Wondering why, I came across many threads discussing this subject, and two studies that suggest that, with music, most listeners think flat is bright and unnatural. This article references both studies (the famous B&K and Sean Olive's): http://www.computeraudiophile.com/bl...le-system-126/

Conversely, flat DOES seem to sound better with movies. The reason is, strangely, correlative to the above. There's a standard with movie mixing called the "X-Curve:" http://www.hometheaterhifi.com/volum...es-6-2002.html If you EQ to flat (or with slight roll-off, which I think is what Audyssey does), with the way most movies are mastered, you'll end up with a response close to, you guessed, the curves mentioned above.

So I've come to the tentative conclusion that the ideal curves for music and movies are indeed different, and I think when I get my sub I'm going to experiment using the Olive and B&K curves as a basis for music, attempting to dial that in using REW and the Xilica, and then letting Audyssey handle the curve for movies. Ironically, this was the setup I was using prior to my fiddling with the processor and I thought it sounded fantastic. My curiosity got the best of me and now I'm both more enlightened and confused (if that makes sense).

I know the cheaper Legacy models don't come with the Xilica. It's also difficult for me to know what to advise without you posting a measurement, but here's one suggestion: toe-in the speakers so that they cross in front of your face rather than behind. That might give you more of a HF roll-off. Also: what's the size of your room? I've read that smaller rooms tend to require sharper HF roll-off. Don't know if there are any studies corroborating that, though.

If you can afford them, definitely look into The Whispers. IMO, they're ideally designed to deal with precisely this problem, as not only do they interact with the room less than most speakers because of the design, the fact that they come with a processor means that you can experiment with different curves, use that for music, and then use another processor for home theater if you want it.
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