Official Denon AVP-A1HD/AVP-A1HDCI and POA-A1HD/POA-A1HDCI owners thread. - Page 12 - AVS Forum
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post #331 of 26357 Old 03-25-2008, 04:47 AM
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Originally Posted by ohyeah32 View Post

Sounds like a great idea!! Bring on those photos guys! We want to see 'em.

I forgot to tell you this before, but those pix you took of your setup are awesome! They came out excellent! Looking forward to any new ones you post.

Here's a few more I took (I'm also including the one I had previously posted on the other thread since this is now the official site).



...

I've said it before and I'll say it again mate - that is an impressive setup!

More photos everyone!!!
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post #332 of 26357 Old 03-25-2008, 04:53 AM
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Another thing - the PS3 gets an update this week (v2.20) that adds BD profile 2.0 compatability, and in this update is a new feature for noise reduction processing on video sources. This is another setting to play with!


I have to give Sony a lot of credit in regards to the way they support the PS3. They have really sent out a lot of firmware updates/upgrades for the PS3 so far, and have done so without making people go through hoops to get them. And Denon seems to be right along with them now with most of their newer offerings, with offering easy to get firmware upgrades via the net. And that's really something that a LOT of other manufacturers should look into doing.
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post #333 of 26357 Old 03-25-2008, 05:09 AM
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Originally Posted by progprog View Post

I agree that we're not going to answer it in this thread, just as we're not going to answer what amp is best with the AVP, what sub-setup is best, what display, etc. Because there is no best; no right or wrong. But I don't get why these things tend to turn into arguments. We're all engaged in this hobby, we all like to play around and tweak and try different things. Can't people just write about what equipment they use and what they like about it? Then the rest of us can take that info and use it, dismiss it, ask questions and share ideas as we please.

Sorry to be so "Rodney King" about this. (Maybe the current U.S. political season has over-sensitized me to people needing to be so right all the time and making everybody else stupid and wrong when they disagree.) I want to hear about everybody's amps and power cords and remote controls and home theater configs with their Denon AVP. I say keep the conversation wide open, as long as it stays civil when we disagree.

Well said.

Variety is after all the spice of life
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post #334 of 26357 Old 03-25-2008, 05:12 AM
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Originally Posted by Johnla View Post

I have to give Sony a lot of credit in regards to the way they support the PS3. They have really sent out a lot of firmware updates/upgrades for the PS3 so far, and have done so without making people go through hoops to get them. And Denon seems to be right along with them now with most of their newer offerings, with offering easy to get firmware upgrades via the net. And that's really something that a LOT of other manufacturers should look into doing.

Have to agree Johnla!

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post #335 of 26357 Old 03-25-2008, 05:16 AM
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Originally Posted by Johnla View Post

I have to give Sony a lot of credit in regards to the way they support the PS3. They have really sent out a lot of firmware updates/upgrades for the PS3 so far, and have done so without making people go through hoops to get them. And Denon seems to be right along with them now with most of their newer offerings, with offering easy to get firmware upgrades via the net. And that's really something that a LOT of other manufacturers should look into doing.

Yes, I totally agree. It shows real commitment from these manufacturers to support us, the customers. Now then, if Sony could just add dts MA and DSD bitstream out for SCAD I would be even happier!
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post #336 of 26357 Old 03-25-2008, 05:18 AM
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Yes, I totally agree. It shows real commitment from these manufacturers to support us, the customers. Now then, if Sony could just add dts MA and DSD bitstream out for SCAD I would be even happier!

I reckon that will be in there new upcoming players.

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post #337 of 26357 Old 03-25-2008, 05:21 AM
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Originally Posted by pentium7 View Post

Don't do it, I tried to buy a pronto and it was a pain in the butt to deal with, just don't have the patience for it I guess.

The Harmony 890 and 1000 are "okay" but they don't work well with lots of functions and the RF has numerous complaints from owners about it stopping and them needing to reset the RF device to get it working again.

The Control 4 with remote and module was $699 + programming includes 2 RS232 + 8 IR I believe maybe more. I decided to get 2 Control 4 modules so I could have 4 RS323 and 16 IR not that I need them but I needed 2 remote controls, 1 for BR, 1 for LR and it gives me a lot more functionality.

The only downside is paying someone to come out to program in a new device, like BD player etc $95 is the cost for simple usually 1 hr for the pros. The upside is that it is supposed to be flawless and extremely functional along with home automation if I elect to add on in the future it is all wireless.

Mine is in transit already.I've heard many saying there great!

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post #338 of 26357 Old 03-25-2008, 05:22 AM
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I reckon that will be in there new upcoming players.

I don't doubt it mate. I realise that the 2500 and 3800 players have hardly been released (in fact, I don't think they have over here yet), if Denon is what you meant, but some info on the next set of DVD/HD/SACD/etc players would be great - or even just some info the top end player. We need DenonJeff back!
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post #339 of 26357 Old 03-25-2008, 05:28 AM
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I don't doubt it mate. I realise that the 2500 and 3800 players have hardly been released (in fact, I don't think they have over here yet), if Denon is what you meant, but some info on the next set of DVD/HD/SACD/etc players would be great - or even just some info the top end player. We need DenonJeff back!

He has definitley left! But good on him for making an apperance.

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post #340 of 26357 Old 03-25-2008, 05:42 AM
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Of course it sounds great, but Denon put those balanced stereo inputs on the AVP for a reason, and that it extremely high quality DACs inside (or outside in the case of an external DAC) a CD player. By placing the AVP into pure-direct mode on the XLR inputs I should think that you will achive the best possible stereo CD playback possible - always a sore point with processors and amps that "do it all".

Perhaps I am asking too much, and what I really want is the Denon DCD-SA1 and then another unit for everything else. But if they could capture the essence of what the DCD-SA1 is about and integrate it into a universal player it would be perfect for me.

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orologio,

There are whole forums on this topic alone! I started to write what I thought would be a brief summary, but quickly realized there's no such thing. I'll tackle it later when I feel more ambitious, but here's the gist of what you need:
  • A server attached to your home network, preferably by ethernet and not wireless. This can be any computer on your network, or you can set up a separate, dedicated server. Check out www.smallnetbuilder.com for info on networks and servers.
  • A program on your computer that you use to burn your CDs to files that you'll store on the server. There are lots of these, including the one you mentioned; some well-known ones include Winamp, dbPoweramp, and Exact Audio Copy (EAC).
  • A file format compatible with all the devices on which you intend to play the music. For the best, CD-quality music, you want a "lossless," not "lossy" format (often confused with compressed/uncompressed, which is a completely different parameter). Apple lossless and .flac are two common lossless formats. The AVP definitely plays .flac but I'm not sure about Apples Lossless. Take a look at http://www.dbpoweramp.com/codec-central.htm for a quick introduction to format options.
  • Device(s) that provide some sort of user interface for accessing your music and playing it back.
Each one of those bullet points really is a huge topic unto itself. Take your time now in the "learning" phase and you'll save lots of headaches later. I use the following: a dedicated Netgear ReadyNAS 3Tb server, EAC to burn CDs to .flac files (though I've also used Winamp and others), and a Sonos system as my primary playback interface. Note that the AVP can play back files directly, but the two-line front panel interface is excruciating. Instead, I connect a Sonos ZP80 via digital coax and use the Sonos handheld and desktop controllers for their far superior usability and interface. The SQ is the same since the AVP's DACs do the decoding in both cases.

I hope that's at least enough to help start your learning process. While this is confusing and time-consuming when you first start out, it's well worth the time, money, and effort. I rediscovered so much of my old music once it was so easily accessible! I can't recommend it highly enough.

progprog,

That's exactly what I wanted to read. A brief panoramic. I didn't understand the concept of the sonos before, that confused me. Now I know where to look at least. Thanks again
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post #341 of 26357 Old 03-25-2008, 06:09 AM
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Originally Posted by progprog View Post

orologio,

There are whole forums on this topic alone! I started to write what I thought would be a brief summary, but quickly realized there's no such thing. I'll tackle it later when I feel more ambitious, but here's the gist of what you need:
  • A server attached to your home network, preferably by ethernet and not wireless. This can be any computer on your network, or you can set up a separate, dedicated server. Check out www.smallnetbuilder.com for info on networks and servers.
  • A program on your computer that you use to burn your CDs to files that you'll store on the server. There are lots of these, including the one you mentioned; some well-known ones include Winamp, dbPoweramp, and Exact Audio Copy (EAC).
  • A file format compatible with all the devices on which you intend to play the music. For the best, CD-quality music, you want a "lossless," not "lossy" format (often confused with compressed/uncompressed, which is a completely different parameter). Apple lossless and .flac are two common lossless formats. The AVP definitely plays .flac but I'm not sure about Apples Lossless. Take a look at http://www.dbpoweramp.com/codec-central.htm for a quick introduction to format options.
  • Device(s) that provide some sort of user interface for accessing your music and playing it back.
Each one of those bullet points really is a huge topic unto itself. Take your time now in the "learning" phase and you'll save lots of headaches later. I use the following: a dedicated Netgear ReadyNAS 3Tb server, EAC to burn CDs to .flac files (though I've also used Winamp and others), and a Sonos system as my primary playback interface. Note that the AVP can play back files directly, but the two-line front panel interface is excruciating. Instead, I connect a Sonos ZP80 via digital coax and use the Sonos handheld and desktop controllers for their far superior usability and interface. The SQ is the same since the AVP's DACs do the decoding in both cases.

I hope that's at least enough to help start your learning process. While this is confusing and time-consuming when you first start out, it's well worth the time, money, and effort. I rediscovered so much of my old music once it was so easily accessible! I can't recommend it highly enough.

Thats Excellent progprog, thanks for that. If you do expand this info, I would love to read it.

As a slight aside, you say that the server should not be wireless. What are the pitfalls if this has to be the case? I want a media server, and I have a spare powerful PC, but it makes lots of noise and it is large. I want to place it somewhere where it cannot be seen or heard and this most likely means upstairs!
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post #342 of 26357 Old 03-25-2008, 06:29 AM
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Thats Excellent progprog, thanks for that. If you do expand this info, I would love to read it.

As a slight aside, you say that the server should not be wireless. What are the pitfalls if this has to be the case? I want a media server, and I have a spare powerful PC, but it makes lots of noise and it is large. I want to place it somewhere where it cannot be seen or heard and this most likely means upstairs!

My understanding is that there are two basic way to create a music server, please correct me if I am wrong: one is a pc/mac based storage system and the other one is a standalone system like Macintosh ms750 (way too expensive for me) and Opus ( i remember an article I recently read on the NY Times). Could you briefly tell what's the pros and cons are in these approaches? My last concern is how do I know whether or not whatever device support 24bit/96hz .flac?
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post #343 of 26357 Old 03-25-2008, 07:35 AM
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Originally Posted by Johnla View Post

I have to give Sony a lot of credit in regards to the way they support the PS3. They have really sent out a lot of firmware updates/upgrades for the PS3 so far, and have done so without making people go through hoops to get them. And Denon seems to be right along with them now with most of their newer offerings, with offering easy to get firmware upgrades via the net. And that's really something that a LOT of other manufacturers should look into doing.

+1.

They won the format war.... now they need to win the more important war of adoption, and they seem very keen to the idea that this is one way to do it.

My only complaint is that I have a launch unit, and it suffers the fan noise of a jet syndrome after about 10-15 minutes of use, in or outside of the cabinet...

I am also very glad to see that Denon, on the receiver side of things, has made continual updates, and are also very easy to get over the net.
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post #344 of 26357 Old 03-25-2008, 08:43 AM
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I tried this - I set the PS3 to not upscale DVD and set the AVP to upscale - but there was a loss of quality. As I said, I'm not too sure why yet, and perhaps I have made settings incorrectly. FWIW, the Denon is able to process and improve an HDMI 1080p signal according to DenonJeff - it does not bypass it. Only when I have the PS3 upscale DVD to 1080p, then the AVP to process that signal do I see the maximum improvement. I will do some more testing tonight.

Another thing - the PS3 gets an update this week (v2.20) that adds BD profile 2.0 compatability, and in this update is a new feature called "Mosquito Noise Reduction" for noise reduction processing on video sources. This is another setting to play with!

If you are using hdmi from PS3 , the minimum output resolution is 480p for SD and this is already deinterlace by the PS3 . As such , HQV realta chip do nothing on the mighty deinterlacing part .

Deinterlacing is more important than upscaling when using a good chipset like Realta .

I have tried 1080p/24 and set the NR but see no difference . According to the manual , it will bypass 1080p signal regardless of 24/50/60 .

This is same when I send 1080p/24 to my Vantage HD video processor . Even I can set the NR , I see no difference unlike when input 480i/1080i signal .

The NR from Realta is one of the best . I really doubt MNR from PS3 can beat it . It may do more harm than good . If the NR from Denon can apply to 1080p input signal , I rather set the PS3 NR to 0 or off and just use the Realta NR to avoid more artifacts and loss of details(blurring effect) .
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post #345 of 26357 Old 03-25-2008, 09:28 AM - Thread Starter
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OH YEAH!!!!!!!! Is that a 60" or 70" SXRD? Very, very nice.

Thanks.

It's a 70 inch SXRD (70 XBR2).
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post #346 of 26357 Old 03-25-2008, 09:39 AM - Thread Starter
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Mate that looks impressive well done Seth!

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I've said it before and I'll say it again mate - that is an impressive setup!

More photos everyone!!!

Thanks guys.
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post #347 of 26357 Old 03-25-2008, 11:26 AM
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Originally Posted by orologio View Post

My understanding is that there are two basic way to create a music server, please correct me if I am wrong: one is a pc/mac based storage system and the other one is a standalone system like Macintosh ms750 (way too expensive for me) and Opus ( i remember an article I recently read on the NY Times). Could you briefly tell what's the pros and cons are in these approaches? My last concern is how do I know whether or not whatever device support 24bit/96hz .flac?

That's pretty close. I think of three possibilities though. (#1 and #3 are similar, but different enough in practice that I consider them different solutions.)
  1. A PC/Mac computer. This is a computer that you actually use where you also store your music files. Pro: it's the cheapest approach since you already have the computer. Con: that computer needs to be running whenever you want to play your music, and doing double duty as server & computer can compromise its performance as both.
  2. A music server system, such as Escient or the Macintosh. Pro: these are dedicated music servers designed specifically in both hardware and software to integrate with your AV system as a complete, self-contained solution. Con: they're really expensive and you can't use their space for other digital storage.
  3. A network attached storage device (NAS). This can be an old computer revamped for the purpose, or a dedicated NAS unit like the one I have. A NAS is essentially a specialized computer designed to make data on its hard drive(s) available over a network. Pro: it's flexible, in that you can store all types of digital files on it, such as data & photos, it's smaller than a PC or music server so your placement options are broader (mine's about the size of a toaster), and it can be on all the time without interfering with other computers. Cons: expensive, though not nearly in the range of Escient-type systems, and requires some networking knowledge to set up and maintain.
These descriptions are not comprehensive, but I hope give you an outline of the three directions you can go with this. As for file types and support, you really have to look into the specific device you're interested in. Page 64 of the AVP manual specifies which formats it can play, and it does not appear to directly accept files with a 96kHz sampling frequency. (For reference, that is an unusual format; most files will be 44.1kHz, as that's the sampling frequency at which CDs are recorded.)

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Originally Posted by MarkB View Post

As a slight aside, you say that the server should not be wireless. What are the pitfalls if this has to be the case? I want a media server, and I have a spare powerful PC, but it makes lots of noise and it is large. I want to place it somewhere where it cannot be seen or heard and this most likely means upstairs!

Wireless can work, but has all the potential pitfalls of any wireless device- interference, dropouts, competition for signal with other wireless devices on the network, etc. Playback devices vary in their buffers-sizes, so some are a more sensitive to break-ups in the data stream, and one that I tried (the Squeezebox) even had a tendency to completely freeze-up when the wireless signal became erratic. And man, it really sucks to have dropouts while your music is playing! I like the security of a good, hardwired connection.

Comment: Ethernet cable is cheap, and it's skinny enough to run under baseboards and through little holes between floors, etc. It's not as daunting as it might seem, and you only have to do it once. But all that said, I don't want to imply that a wireless option isn't viable. With a strong, reliable signal, it can indeed work well.
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post #348 of 26357 Old 03-25-2008, 12:28 PM
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Originally Posted by progprog View Post

That's pretty close. I think of three possibilities though. (#1 and #3 are similar, but different enough in practice that I consider them different solutions.)
  1. A PC/Mac computer. This is a computer that you actually use where you also store your music files. Pro: it's the cheapest approach since you already have the computer. Con: that computer needs to be running whenever you want to play your music, and doing double duty as server & computer can compromise its performance as both.
  2. A music server system, such as Escient or the Macintosh. Pro: these are dedicated music servers designed specifically in both hardware and software to integrate with your AV system as a complete, self-contained solution. Con: they're really expensive and you can't use their space for other digital storage.
  3. A network attached storage device (NAS). This can be an old computer revamped for the purpose, or a dedicated NAS unit like the one I have. A NAS is essentially a specialized computer designed to make data on its hard drive(s) available over a network. Pro: it's flexible, in that you can store all types of digital files on it, such as data & photos, it's smaller than a PC or music server so your placement options are broader (mine's about the size of a toaster), and it can be on all the time without interfering with other computers. Cons: expensive, though not nearly in the range of Escient-type systems, and requires some networking knowledge to set up and maintain.
These descriptions are not comprehensive, but I hope give you an outline of the three directions you can go with this. As for file types and support, you really have to look into the specific device you're interested in. Page 64 of the AVP manual specifies which formats it can play, and it does not appear to directly accept files with a 96kHz sampling frequency. (For reference, that is an unusual format; most files will be 44.1kHz, as that's the sampling frequency at which CDs are recorded.)



Wireless can work, but has all the potential pitfalls of any wireless device- interference, dropouts, competition for signal with other wireless devices on the network, etc. Playback devices vary in their buffers-sizes, so some are a more sensitive to break-ups in the data stream, and one that I tried (the Squeezebox) even had a tendency to completely freeze-up when the wireless signal became erratic. And man, it really sucks to have dropouts while your music is playing! I like the security of a good, hardwired connection.

Comment: Ethernet cable is cheap, and it's skinny enough to run under baseboards and through little holes between floors, etc. It's not as daunting as it might seem, and you only have to do it once. But all that said, I don't want to imply that a wireless option isn't viable. With a strong, reliable signal, it can indeed work well.

Thank you very much for your kind and helpful explanation. I learned a lot from your post.

Yes the AVP manual's page 64 mentions 44.1kHz, while on the website specs I read this line: "True 24-bit/96-kHz Digital Input Capability". Frankly I don't know what that means, but by curiosity because of that I got interested to Linn Studio Master hi-res downloads ...but the specs are now irrelevant. I will be soon setting a NAS, now that I know what it is.
Thanks again.
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post #349 of 26357 Old 03-25-2008, 12:50 PM
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Originally Posted by orologio View Post

Thank you very much for your kind and helpful explanation. I learned a lot from your post.

Yes the AVP manual's page 64 mentions 44.1kHz, while on the website specs I read this line: "True 24-bit/96-kHz Digital Input Capability". Frankly I don't know what that means, but by curiosity because of that I got interested to Linn Studio Master hi-res downloads ...but the specs are now irrelevant. I will be soon setting a NAS, now that I know what it is.
Thanks again.

Yeah, I thought that was a little strange, too. DVD-Audio is 24-bit/96kHz, so it's certainly not an unheard of format. My interpretation, which is only that, would be that the AVP's integrated network player does not accept that particular file type. That doesn't necessarily mean other inputs can't accept it, and that's significant (see my last point in this post).

There's a very important fundamental difference that I failed to point out between dedicated music servers and the the other two options (PC/Mac or NAS). The dedicated music servers integrate the storage and interface aspects of this process into one system. The other two options I described are just the storage end of the system, allowing you to opt for a variety of interface/playback options. I.e., first you choose where you'll store the music files, then you choose device(s) and interfaces for playing them back. I personally think that flexibility's a big advantage, as you can select the interface you like best. Or even more than one.

For those of you thinking about setting up networked music, I honestly doubt that you'll end up using the integrated player in the AVP. It's just too cumbersome if you have more than about four albums. So you'll likely end up looking at products from Sonos, Slim Devices (now Logitech), or the like. And with these, you'll be feeding the signal to your AVP through one of the digital or analog inputs, like "CD," which may have different capabilities than the integrated network player.
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post #350 of 26357 Old 03-25-2008, 01:05 PM
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can anyone tell me if the balanced ins and outs on this unit are in fact a true, fully balanced dual differential circuit, or are they simply xlr connectors like many cheaper units do? also, is this the exact same video board/circuit used in the 5308 receiver?

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post #351 of 26357 Old 03-25-2008, 01:16 PM
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can anyone tell me if the balanced ins and outs on this unit are in fact a true, fully balanced dual differential circuit, or are they simply xlr connectors like many cheaper units do? also, is this the exact same video board/circuit used in the 5308 receiver?

as per denon jeff, it is true balanced dual differential. not sure on the video board circuit to comment.

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post #352 of 26357 Old 03-25-2008, 01:20 PM
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Any word if the AVP will do any video frame rate conversion or any other advanced video proscessing or is the Realta only scaling in the AVP?
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post #353 of 26357 Old 03-25-2008, 01:33 PM
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And are these balanced outputs of the floating type where it is possible to ground the pos or neg output to feed an unbalanced input?

Is there a brave soul out there that had a look at the opamps used in the dac section?

My very expensive (former) top of the line Denon had these very cheap ($0.45) JRC op-amps.
I replaced the lot with audio grade dual opamps and while I was at it I also replaced the coupling capacitors with black gate capacitors.
The sound quality went up considerably. (The parts alone set me back around $1000)

Looking forward to upgrading the AVP HD1.
I have to build myself some more power amplifiers.
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post #354 of 26357 Old 03-25-2008, 01:49 PM
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Frank Derks View Post

And are these balanced outputs of the floating type where it is possible to ground the pos or neg output to feed an unbalanced input?

Is there a brave soul out there that had a look at the opamps used in the dac section?

My very expensive (former) top of the line Denon had these very cheap ($0.45) JRC op-amps.
I replaced the lot with audio grade dual opamps and while I was at it I also replaced the coupling capacitors with black gate capacitors.
The sound quality went up considerably. (The parts alone set me back around $1000)

Looking forward to upgrading the AVP HD1.
I have to build myself some more power amplifiers.

More power to you, Frank. (Pun intended....) You're operating out of my league, as the AVP is, all by itself, my big upgrade! I don't think I want to pop it open and start poking around with a soldering iron in there.
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post #355 of 26357 Old 03-25-2008, 01:55 PM
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Quote:
Originally Posted by progprog View Post

That's pretty close. I think of three possibilities though. (#1 and #3 are similar, but different enough in practice that I consider them different solutions.)
  1. A PC/Mac computer. This is a computer that you actually use where you also store your music files. Pro: it's the cheapest approach since you already have the computer. Con: that computer needs to be running whenever you want to play your music, and doing double duty as server & computer can compromise its performance as both.
  2. A music server system, such as Escient or the Macintosh. Pro: these are dedicated music servers designed specifically in both hardware and software to integrate with your AV system as a complete, self-contained solution. Con: they're really expensive and you can't use their space for other digital storage.
  3. A network attached storage device (NAS). This can be an old computer revamped for the purpose, or a dedicated NAS unit like the one I have. A NAS is essentially a specialized computer designed to make data on its hard drive(s) available over a network. Pro: it's flexible, in that you can store all types of digital files on it, such as data & photos, it's smaller than a PC or music server so your placement options are broader (mine's about the size of a toaster), and it can be on all the time without interfering with other computers. Cons: expensive, though not nearly in the range of Escient-type systems, and requires some networking knowledge to set up and maintain.
These descriptions are not comprehensive, but I hope give you an outline of the three directions you can go with this. As for file types and support, you really have to look into the specific device you're interested in. Page 64 of the AVP manual specifies which formats it can play, and it does not appear to directly accept files with a 96kHz sampling frequency. (For reference, that is an unusual format; most files will be 44.1kHz, as that's the sampling frequency at which CDs are recorded.)



Wireless can work, but has all the potential pitfalls of any wireless device- interference, dropouts, competition for signal with other wireless devices on the network, etc. Playback devices vary in their buffers-sizes, so some are a more sensitive to break-ups in the data stream, and one that I tried (the Squeezebox) even had a tendency to completely freeze-up when the wireless signal became erratic. And man, it really sucks to have dropouts while your music is playing! I like the security of a good, hardwired connection.

Comment: Ethernet cable is cheap, and it's skinny enough to run under baseboards and through little holes between floors, etc. It's not as daunting as it might seem, and you only have to do it once. But all that said, I don't want to imply that a wireless option isn't viable. With a strong, reliable signal, it can indeed work well.

Great write-up Prog!!!.

I use a NAS that has a built in Media Server (Twonky). It works great with the Denon (and PS3 I owned). It is simple to setup, and you don't need to keep your PC on. This cuts down on noise in the room.

The brand I use is QNAP. You just pop in a standard hard drive, plug the unit into your router, and load your Flac files onto the drive. In addition to working as Media Server, it works as a Web Server.

The cost is pretty inexpensive, adn you can chose the hard drive size that suits you.

Darrell
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post #356 of 26357 Old 03-25-2008, 03:03 PM
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Frank Derks View Post

And are these balanced outputs of the floating type where it is possible to ground the pos or neg output to feed an unbalanced input?

Is there a brave soul out there that had a look at the opamps used in the dac section?

My very expensive (former) top of the line Denon had these very cheap ($0.45) JRC op-amps.
I replaced the lot with audio grade dual opamps and while I was at it I also replaced the coupling capacitors with black gate capacitors.
The sound quality went up considerably. (The parts alone set me back around $1000)

Looking forward to upgrading the AVP HD1.
I have to build myself some more power amplifiers.

Interesting - Keep us posted on your updates and experiences Frank!
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post #357 of 26357 Old 03-25-2008, 04:48 PM
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I will get me an AVP in a couple of months.

Perheps this beast is using better parts than other denon equipment.
I recently opened had to open up my DVD A11 and there they were again cheap JRC opamps. (Needed to clean the lens to cure the dropouts with DVD A playback.
To get sacd going again I need to replace the laser. Deminishing light output and low reflectivity of hybrid layers is a guarantee for trouble. I hope blu ray didn't make that same mistake but I have little hope so that's wy I'm going expensive on the preamp and cheap blu ray players for the time being.)
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post #358 of 26357 Old 03-25-2008, 10:29 PM
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Franin View Post

Had the HArmony 1000i that was ok but know getting the phililps pronto 9600.Looking forward to having a play around with that one.

T-minus one day for my AVP arrival!!!

I have a new Philiips Pronto TSU-9600 sitting in a box awaiting the arrival of my AVP. I've used a Phillips Pronto TSU-1000 for years and years and am a hugh fan of the Pronto line.

Although it takes time, one can customize screens on the remote optimizing for the way one uses ones equipment. For example, with my current TSU-1000, I have all of my frequently used DirecTV HR-20 DVR commands on one screen! Also, leveraging other work from places like RemoteCentral saves a tremendous amount of time getting started.
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post #359 of 26357 Old 03-25-2008, 11:07 PM
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All of my gear shipped late yesterday, AVP/POA, 5308 is the Denon gear. This will be my first and big leap into true HT. Along with the Denon gear, the following makes up my HT

JVC RS2 w/lens & sled
Focal 7.1 setup 1037BE, CC1000BE, SR1000BE
Velodyne 1812 Signature
120" 2.35:1 Stewart StudioTek 130
Salamander Quad 20
Transparent Cable Musiclink Plus speaker wires and XLR

I never got the chance to audition the 1037 but did hear the 1027 with the wife, the Beryllium tweeter was unmatched by anything I've heard before, creeking of a door in a song was so real sounding and it wasn't even SACD or DVD-A just a standard CD. They also were only pushing 125W/Chan with a fairly inexpensive amp.

I have a lot to answer for if when this is done the wife isn't really really impressed, actually I'll have to answer to myself so I hope this all works out looks and sound wise. Relying on Denon to bring the quality "home"
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post #360 of 26357 Old 03-26-2008, 12:07 AM
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Quote:
Originally Posted by progprog View Post

Wireless can work, but has all the potential pitfalls of any wireless device- interference, dropouts, competition for signal with other wireless devices on the network, etc. Playback devices vary in their buffers-sizes, so some are a more sensitive to break-ups in the data stream, and one that I tried (the Squeezebox) even had a tendency to completely freeze-up when the wireless signal became erratic. And man, it really sucks to have dropouts while your music is playing! I like the security of a good, hardwired connection.

Comment: Ethernet cable is cheap, and it's skinny enough to run under baseboards and through little holes between floors, etc. It's not as daunting as it might seem, and you only have to do it once. But all that said, I don't want to imply that a wireless option isn't viable. With a strong, reliable signal, it can indeed work well.

Also don't forget, that while wireless may work good for some people, it still is probably not the best option to use during a download of a firmware update/upgrade via the itnernet. For that doing that, even if I had a good wireless setup working. I would even go through the trouble of running some sort of a temporary ethernet cable and using a hardwire connection instead.
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