AVS Forum

AVS Forum (http://www.avsforum.com/forum/)
-   Receivers, Amps, and Processors (http://www.avsforum.com/forum/90-receivers-amps-processors/)
-   -   H/K AVR 430 volume issue (http://www.avsforum.com/forum/90-receivers-amps-processors/1109507-h-k-avr-430-volume-issue.html)

elewsader 01-16-2009 07:00 PM

This is more of a solution to a problem I've discovered with a Harman Kardon AVR 430 (assembled nov. 2003) I recently recieved for free. The unit exhibited a random full volume increase in which the owner decided to toss in the basement and purchase a new one.

scouring the internet for a solution I came up with very little but unhappy h/k customers and one individual who almost had a heart-attack when he fell asleep and his reciever did this. I eventually came across some very similar issues with sub-model AVR 330 referring to a "Volume encoder" specifically the VR74 being replaced in later manufactured units with VR81 and decided to contact "www_dot_harmanaudio_dot_com" after speaking to a surprisingly helpful rep there they came up with part number "H03-SWE3A0505S1-R". I Purchased the $2.70 part and shipped $3.57 for a total of $6.27 invested then a week later it arrived.

in my quick decision of philanthropy I decided to write this up, but unfortunately it was after reassembling the unit so I'll try to explain the process, and I apologize for not having pics of the disassembly.

tools needed.
- phillips screw driver
- soldering iron
- solder
- solder sucker (or it may be difficult)
- small side cutters/clippers

1. remove top panel affixed by 4 silver screws on each side and 6 black in the rear
2. unclip zip ties on the skeleton of the chassis
3. take a picture or two prior to disconnecting stuff as it is helpful for reference points.
4. remove screws on the sides/top/bottom of faceplate.
5. pop off faceplate and you'll see a bunch of obnoxious connections i.e. power button volume control module, etc.
6. remove two white ribbon cables.
7. disconnect cable reaching the far left of bottom component board (orientation is looking at front of reciever)
8. you maybe able to disconnect less/more to aid in getting to the component board behind the volume knob.
9. remove volume knob (tug on it a little)
10. underneath the volume knob is a collar screw and washer, this will allow you to remove the assembly behind it after removing the two screws holding it in place.
11. the volume encoder is held on by 5 solder points, you will need to take the soldering iron to these until they "flow" (this is where it helps to have the item disconnected if possible) at that point use the solder sucker to remove flux - act quickly since it will harden fast.
12. once solder is removed (may take some time) you can pry the old volume encoder off.
13. affix the new volume encoder to green pcb.
14. do the opposite of what you did and you should be back in business.

once again I apologize for not having any pictures of the tear down but I really don't want to tear this thing apart again. In the future if I find a solution I will make sure to document it properly. Hopefully this write up should help some people if anyone still has this aged reciever around.

-Ed

***Additional images added with the help of Eric HA
LL
LL
LL
LL
LL

Eric HA 02-17-2009 12:49 PM

Thanks for posting this Ed. I thought my problem was from an outside infrared source, but sheet cork and electrical tape didn't seem to fix the problem, let alone rendering my remote useless. I ordered over the phone. 516-682-6438


All times are GMT -7. The time now is 04:15 AM.

Powered by vBulletin® Copyright ©2000 - 2014, Jelsoft Enterprises Ltd.

vBulletin Optimisation provided by vB Optimise (Pro) - vBulletin Mods & Addons Copyright © 2014 DragonByte Technologies Ltd.
User Alert System provided by Advanced User Tagging (Pro) - vBulletin Mods & Addons Copyright © 2014 DragonByte Technologies Ltd.