Can you explain my Onkyo receiver repair bill? - AVS Forum
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post #1 of 9 Old 05-05-2009, 12:00 PM - Thread Starter
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I just got my TX-SR602 back from the shop, and the tech wrote it up as "replaced defective components on +12 and -12 volt supply circuitry" and charged me $130.

Any idea what that means or what caused this part to go bad? Did I overpay? Is this a common problem?

The symptoms were: No sound coming from speakers, regardless of input (including radio tuner), even after resetting the receiver. The receiver still turned on and made the usual "click" sound upon startup. No changes were made to the setup before I started experiencing the problem. One day it was working, the next day it wasn't. Video output was unaffected.

Thanks in advance,

Jeff
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post #2 of 9 Old 05-05-2009, 12:38 PM
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The 602 is 5 generations old, the 607 is out now so imo yes you overpaid since you could have picked one up on the used market for probably the same price or less.

No, I don't think it's a common problem it's probably age, the receiver is an older model.

Though I have no idea of what is meant by "replaced defective components on +12 and -12 volt supply circuitry" or the value of those defective components from a repair aspect I don't think you were over charged. They generally charge 1/2 that if your lucky or usually much much more to even look at a receiver that's out of warranty so imo from that aspect you weren't overcharged, but the receiver wasn't worth putting that kind of money into when you can get more recent refurb models with hdmi for not much more.
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post #3 of 9 Old 05-05-2009, 01:21 PM
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Parts costs are insignificant..
Biggest $ is bench time.
How much unit disassembly time was needed to be done to access the circuit board and replace the mentioned power supply parts.
Also as previously mentioned often the labor charges could easily exceed the value of an earlier AVR that has become obsolete due to the later technologies.

Just my $0.025..
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post #4 of 9 Old 05-05-2009, 01:26 PM
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It sounds like they replaced the power supply. It goes in as 120v AC, but is then converted to DC current to run the receiver. The voltage rails out of the power supply must be +12v and -12v. No power there, your receiver won't function.

It probably wasn't worth fixing. Most electronics these days are made to be disposed of.
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post #5 of 9 Old 05-05-2009, 01:32 PM
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Bap caps on one of the power supply boards is a likely explanation.

"But this one goes up to 11"
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post #6 of 9 Old 05-05-2009, 01:44 PM
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+12/-12V rails would be used in areas like low-level audio stages, protection circuit, relay drivers, and displays. Output stage/driver rails would be higher voltage. Defective supply components may probably have been bridge rectifier for the 12V rails, and/or voltage regulator(s) and/or associated parts. As mentioned above, these parts costs are minimal, probably no more than $5 or $10. Its the labor that gets you.

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post #7 of 9 Old 05-05-2009, 01:46 PM
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He probably just blew out some dust with a can of compressed air. But, he had to write something on the ticket.

If it's working again, you're OK. Next time ask here, before repair.
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post #8 of 9 Old 05-05-2009, 01:58 PM
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Glen B View Post

+12/-12V rails would be used in areas like low-level audio stages, protection circuit, relay drivers, and displays. Output stage/driver rails would be higher voltage. Defective supply components may probably have been bridge rectifier for the 12V rails, and/or voltage regulator(s) and/or associated parts. As mentioned above, these parts costs are minimal, probably no more than $5 or $10. Its the labor that gets you.

I agree about the main power supply rails. I would say +30/-30 volts minimum.

AVR's are loaded up with various power regulators as they need to produce quite a few different voltages for different purposes.

"But this one goes up to 11"
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post #9 of 9 Old 05-05-2009, 02:09 PM
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That's cheap, consider yourself lucky.
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