Official Emotiva XPA-5 Owners Thread - Page 31 - AVS Forum
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post #901 of 2033 Old 02-05-2013, 06:47 AM
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Originally Posted by Theresa View Post

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Freudian slip, Theresa? biggrin.gif

No problems with my three amps, nor my friend's five...

No Freudian slip, I prefer "goddess" to "god."
I'm currently driving my tweeters with a UPA-5. Please note, I do NOT use passive biamping but rather active crossovers. No sibilance. I do have good tweeter's though.

Ah, I was thinking of the phrase "honest to goodness"... My humble apologies, most benevolent one! biggrin.gif

Are you tri-amping?

"After silence, that which best expresses the inexpressible, is music" - Aldous Huxley
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post #902 of 2033 Old 02-05-2013, 06:55 AM
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No, what I meant was, how many amps, or what current does this amp push? In other words, a 140wpc amp running at 20amps will not even touch a 70wpc runnning at 35amps. Im in the market for a new amp, well my first amp I should say, and all Ive heard during my research is that the current of the amp will say more about its ability to push out sound than just its watts per channel. Very few manufacturers even post that in their specs. Ive seen a few, but not many.

The amount of current delivered by the amp depends on the load connected to it. This is why a 4 ohm load draws more current than an 8 ohm load (less resistance enables the amp to deliver more current for its rated power). I think you are assuming the amp somehow 'pushes' current to its load but in reality it is the opposite way around - the less resistive the load the more current the amp will deliver - ie the load draws the current required not the other way around. 

^^^ This. Most amps look like voltage sources, or try to, and the current they deliver is set by the load. Thus manufacturers specify power at a given load impedance. A 140 W amp and 70 W amp put out the same current into an identical load assuming they are operated within their power ratings.

If high current is a concern, look for amplifiers that provide the most power as impedance drops, e.g. that double power output going from 8 ohms to 4 and on down. Those are generally more expensive amps...

An amp rated at 140 wpc into 8 ohms would deliver sqrt(140/8) = 4.183 A. To reach 20 A, still putting out 140 W, the load would be (140/20^2) = 0.35 ohms, pretty durn low...

Look up Ohm's Law.

"After silence, that which best expresses the inexpressible, is music" - Aldous Huxley
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post #903 of 2033 Old 02-05-2013, 07:58 AM
 
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I'm no Emotiva lover but the odds that they are making amps with unique congenital problems with sibillance is about zero. If memory serves Emotiva publish comprehensive bench test results for their amps on their web site, right? If they had such a problem it would show up there.
That just proves that those weren't the sources of the sibilance in those cases.

The most likely causes of sibilance are the wrong speakers in the wrong room with the wrong recordings.

The other situation is that it seems less likely that a stand-alone power amp is being used with an automated system optimization facility such as Audyssey, MCACC or YPAO. They can be big helps for sibilance problems.


This is the issue that most seem to assume, that those with sibilance are saying it's the Emotiva amp. They are not saying this, and it's clearly not the amps. Emotiva does not make defective amps. What they are saying is with some recorded music there is the possibility of sibilance that a bright speaker could accentuate. Some found that a solid state amp with flat response could reproduce the sibilance while some other brands do not reproduce it. And in 2 channel systems with no room correction, there is no option to EQ the offending frequency. Anyway, very few are having the speaker issue.
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post #904 of 2033 Old 02-05-2013, 08:03 AM
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Originally Posted by Theresa View Post

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Freudian slip, Theresa? biggrin.gif

No problems with my three amps, nor my friend's five...

No Freudian slip, I prefer "goddess" to "god."
I'm currently driving my tweeters with a UPA-5. Please note, I do NOT use passive biamping but rather active crossovers. No sibilance. I do have good tweeter's though.

Ah, I was thinking of the phrase "honest to goodness"... My humble apologies, most benevolent one! biggrin.gif

Are you tri-amping?

 

I thought the same as you at first and almost posted a similar comment. Then I remembered that this was Theresa and thought "I bet she meant to say goddess instead of god". LOL.

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post #905 of 2033 Old 02-05-2013, 08:20 AM
 
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Amps are amps if properly designed and working within their design parameters. I get as fed up of typing that as I am sure others do of reading it, but the point never seems to get across fully. You are right when you say of the other amps that none was better than the Emotiva, given that Emotiva amps are well designed.

Emotiva amps do not 'cause' sibilance. End of. If someone has sibilance in his system it means that a frequency band of 5-6 KHz is being emphasised for some reason (I am assuming tweeters are not broken etc). If you look at the FR plots for the Emo amps there is no such emphasis, so the Emo amps simply cannot be responsible for it. Anyone suffering from this problem needs to look elsewhere to find the source of the sibilance and fix it. Also some people are especially sensitive to sibilance and 'go looking' for it. Sometimes there is natural sibilance on a voice and that needs to be considered too. But whatever causes it, it ain't the Emos.

You later posted that you were in fact not 'bent out of shape' as I mentioned, I would just say that when a person types that they are fed up with repeating themselves it means that they are unhappy about it, so I am glad to hear that this did not upset you after all.

At any rate, as I just responded to another poster, no one is saying that the Emotiva amps are defective or cause sibilance. It is the recorded music coupled with a bright speaker that causes it. At least that's what I found in my 2 channel system which included an Emotiva amp, the XPA-3. I read up on the issue about 8 months ago when I first noticed it, and realized that my Paradigm Signature speakers, while being very defining and resolving, with some tracks of music I was getting sibilance. I did not have the option of EQing it out, and I didn't want to replace the $6000 speakers and keep the $600 amp, since the speakers are otherwise so amazing. But none the less, I had a problem.

Further reading, which would be heresy around here, was that some amps had a warmer sound and would aid this. On other forums they suggested Anthem amps to me as they are the sister company to Paradigm, but I had a bad experience with one of their preamps, so I was reluctant to give them another shot, plus Anthem higher end amps run into several thousand dollars. Some suggested tube amps, which also have a warmer sound. But I read about Parasound amps and thought this would be the answer. I bought a A21 amp, 250 wpc, and when I hooked it up and ran it side by side with the Emotiva amp using the same tracks and the same system at the same volume( measured with a sound level meter) the sibilance was gone with the Parasound amp. Some may want to take issue with this, and that is fine, I share it here for those who may be experiencing this and looking for solutions as I was.

So when this thread on the Emotiva forum came up I read with interest because I had been there, and it is not a fun place to be when your system is having problems. I'll leave it there, I'm not trying to stir the pot or anything, I just thought some might be struggling with the same issue I had.
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post #906 of 2033 Old 02-05-2013, 09:27 AM
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Amps are amps if properly designed and working within their design parameters. I get as fed up of typing that as I am sure others do of reading it, but the point never seems to get across fully. You are right when you say of the other amps that none was better than the Emotiva, given that Emotiva amps are well designed.

Emotiva amps do not 'cause' sibilance. End of. If someone has sibilance in his system it means that a frequency band of 5-6 KHz is being emphasised for some reason (I am assuming tweeters are not broken etc). If you look at the FR plots for the Emo amps there is no such emphasis, so the Emo amps simply cannot be responsible for it. Anyone suffering from this problem needs to look elsewhere to find the source of the sibilance and fix it. Also some people are especially sensitive to sibilance and 'go looking' for it. Sometimes there is natural sibilance on a voice and that needs to be considered too. But whatever causes it, it ain't the Emos.

You later posted that you were in fact not 'bent out of shape' as I mentioned, I would just say that when a person types that they are fed up with repeating themselves it means that they are unhappy about it, so I am glad to hear that this did not upset you after all.

At any rate, as I just responded to another poster, no one is saying that the Emotiva amps are defective or cause sibilance. It is the recorded music coupled with a bright speaker that causes it. At least that's what I found in my 2 channel system which included an Emotiva amp, the XPA-3. I read up on the issue about 8 months ago when I first noticed it, and realized that my Paradigm Signature speakers, while being very defining and resolving, with some tracks of music I was getting sibilance. I did not have the option of EQing it out, and I didn't want to replace the $6000 speakers and keep the $600 amp, since the speakers are otherwise so amazing. But none the less, I had a problem.

Further reading, which would be heresy around here, was that some amps had a warmer sound and would aid this. On other forums they suggested Anthem amps to me as they are the sister company to Paradigm, but I had a bad experience with one of their preamps, so I was reluctant to give them another shot, plus Anthem higher end amps run into several thousand dollars. Some suggested tube amps, which also have a warmer sound. But I read about Parasound amps and thought this would be the answer. I bought a A21 amp, 250 wpc, and when I hooked it up and ran it side by side with the Emotiva amp using the same tracks and the same system at the same volume( measured with a sound level meter) the sibilance was gone with the Parasound amp. Some may want to take issue with this, and that is fine, I share it here for those who may be experiencing this and looking for solutions as I was.

So when this thread on the Emotiva forum came up I read with interest because I had been there, and it is not a fun place to be when your system is having problems. I'll leave it there, I'm not trying to stir the pot or anything, I just thought some might be struggling with the same issue I had.

 

All fair enough. I wasn't disputing that you heard what you heard or that it went away when you did what you did. Just pointing out that amps can't really, of themselves, 'cause' sibilance unless they have a design flaw or are broken. Whatever fixed it for you, I am glad that it did.

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post #907 of 2033 Old 02-05-2013, 11:04 AM
 
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i would put room acoustics ahead of speakers...



cheers


Probably right. A well treated room can make a $2,000 set of speakers sound like a $20,000 set (in an untreated room). But if you put a $20,000 set of speakers in a bad, untreated room, they will almost always sound like cr


your right again K


heres my 1st absorber for under 20.. i figure about 8-12 of these will do alot of good in my yet to be built room.. im a slow builder. this trap really works ..


few on the ceilings walls and corners.. but as a few people have said not to much... few at a time ....



Nice job!  If it is a broadband absorber ("bass trap") they say you can't have too many but I am with you - go steadily and add a few at a time. If you have REW you can use ETCs and waterfalls to help decide where they go. If not, start with any of the 12 corners in the room and add them in a controlled way, listening each time that you make changes.

will be taking this pic into consideration... this guy has some really good utube vids out there..

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post #908 of 2033 Old 02-05-2013, 11:18 AM
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OK, let me try and convey what I obviously am having trouble trying to convey. I used some wrong lingo when trying to ask what I was asking. Recently I decided to go to separates and try and upgrade my system. Along the way in my research I ran across a thread (i cant recall where) that made mention of current when considering a power amp. During my visit at a local Hi_fi place, the salesman made the same comment. The amp I was considering, although higher wpc, did not deliver those wpc at the same current as the another wpc amp did. Like the thread I had read, he made the same analogy to describe what he was talking about. He said a 140wpc amp running at a low current would be like 140 watts coming through a garden hose while another amp running at 140wpc through a firehose. The higher current amp is going to sound cleaner, louder and just plain better. From what Ive read and experienced in my research, most manufacturers dont post current in their specs. I have seen some that do though. For research's sake, Im trying to find out that particular spec on the Emotiva XPA5 before buying it. Im pretty sold on it, but would like to know just for S&G.
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post #909 of 2033 Old 02-05-2013, 11:26 AM
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OK, let me try and convey what I obviously am having trouble trying to convey. I used some wrong lingo when trying to ask what I was asking. Recently I decided to go to separates and try and upgrade my system. Along the way in my research I ran across a thread (i cant recall where) that made mention of current when considering a power amp. During my visit at a local Hi_fi place, the salesman made the same comment. The amp I was considering, although higher wpc, did not deliver those wpc at the same current as the another wpc amp did. Like the thread I had read, he made the same analogy to describe what he was talking about. He said a 140wpc amp running at a low current would be like 140 watts coming through a garden hose while another amp running at 140wpc through a firehose. The higher current amp is going to sound cleaner, louder and just plain better. From what Ive read and experienced in my research, most manufacturers dont post current in their specs. I have seen some that do though. For research's sake, Im trying to find out that particular spec on the Emotiva XPA5 before buying it. Im pretty sold on it, but would like to know just for S&G.

I think you should just forget what you've been told by those two sources. They do not know what they are talking about. Watts=Volts times amps (current).
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post #910 of 2033 Old 02-05-2013, 12:12 PM
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+1.

This makes no sense to me: "The amp I was considering, although higher wpc, did not deliver those wpc at the same current as the another wpc amp did."

Rats, once again three engineering degrees and decades of experience upstaged by the local hi-fi salesperson. smile.gif

"After silence, that which best expresses the inexpressible, is music" - Aldous Huxley
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post #911 of 2033 Old 02-05-2013, 12:20 PM
 
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Don, maybe you can give your thoughts on this. Every amp has a power supply, yes? Would a larger power supply or transformer for a given wattage rating mean that an amp would have a larger amount of power in reserve? My Onkyo AVR is rated at 140 watts per 7 channels, and the tranny is much smaller than the one in my 7 channel amp rated at 125 watts for 7 channels.
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post #912 of 2033 Old 02-05-2013, 01:07 PM
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Your Onkyo is probably rated 140 Watt per channel, single channel driven as most similar units are.
Running the same test with all seven channels driven together using the same signal will "degrade"/lower its measured "real" power to appr. 70 Watt per channel.
A separate amp usually has a higher power reserve with a more potent power supply (capacitance, sometimes transformer) and much larger heat sinks.

PS.: Power reserve does not raise the power output of the amp but allows it to sustain power demands for a certain amount of times (usually ms).
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post #913 of 2033 Old 02-05-2013, 03:03 PM
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2 Channels driven @ 8ohms.
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A large amount of power in reserve is only useful if needed smile.gif

As you say, receivers often have power supplies which are substantially less capable than a good amp. Whether it proves the receiver can't get it done, is dependent on a non trivial amount of variables.

My Z7 did not benefit from additional amps. But if I turn up my bedroom receiver so I can better hear the music in the other room, it seems more limited than my Z7 does. But there's so many variables in terms of speakers and such, I am loath to say the bedroom receiver would fail to work in my living room setup with no added amping. I have my theories though (and the bedroom receiver is an 800 series.)

"But this one goes up to 11"
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post #915 of 2033 Old 02-05-2013, 05:07 PM
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Quote:
Originally Posted by runnin' View Post

Don, maybe you can give your thoughts on this. Every amp has a power supply, yes? Would a larger power supply or transformer for a given wattage rating mean that an amp would have a larger amount of power in reserve? My Onkyo AVR is rated at 140 watts per 7 channels, and the tranny is much smaller than the one in my 7 channel amp rated at 125 watts for 7 channels.

The simple answer is yes, although Mikey Human said it: the "power in reserve" only matters if you need and use it.

Here's some off-the-cuff points (I am sure someone will correct me if I'm wrong and expand on them regardless):
  1. A larger supply (bigger power transformer, diodes, and more capacitors) will not provide any more maximum output power.
  2. It will provide greater ability to sustain full power to more channels over a longer time.
    - It is not clear that matters in the real world when most channels are essentially "idling", and even the main L/R channels typically only need a few Watts for most of the movie or music.
    - Manufacturers take advantage of this by reducing power supplies to reduce cost. It may or may not be audible (is not most of the time would be my guess).
  3. That "power reserve" might be needed for:
    - Sustained LF signals since they tend to use the most power
    - High continuous levels, perhaps with all channels driven hard
    - Speakers with very low impedances or low sensitivity that require high current as well as voltage
  4. Lots of capacitance provides charge storage to ride out short-term peaks, (very roughly) ms to seconds
  5. Large transformers provide endurance for continuous (or long-term) power delivery, (ditto) minutes to hours
    - Note modern magnet materials may reduce the size of a transformer and retain high current capacity
    - Neither of these last two points apply to switching power supplies, which require much less capacitance and smaller transformers to deliver high power due to their high efficiency, though there are other trades...

Note a full-wave rectifier recharges the capacitors at 120 Hz, so the benefits of large capacitors may not mean all that much below that frequency since the transformer and diodes are "refilling the tank" roughly 120 times a second. That is at the peaks, so the actual limit is probably more like 60 Hz. That is not to say there is not a lot of loud bass at and above 60 Hz...

In general the unit with the beefier power supply can provide benefits in terms of "power reserve" including less crosstalk among channels sharing the supply, greater ability to handle large transients and longer peaks, and perhaps cooler operation. The trades are greater size and weight, as well as higher cost. I tend to look at the power ratings for all vs. two channels and all else equal would choose the one that holds up better. However, all else is rarely equal, and unless I had hard-to-drive speakers and the disparity was large it would not be a significant influence on my purchase decision.

HTH - Don

"After silence, that which best expresses the inexpressible, is music" - Aldous Huxley
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OK, let me try and convey what I obviously am having trouble trying to convey. I used some wrong lingo when trying to ask what I was asking. Recently I decided to go to separates and try and upgrade my system. Along the way in my research I ran across a thread (i cant recall where) that made mention of current when considering a power amp. During my visit at a local Hi_fi place, the salesman made the same comment. The amp I was considering, although higher wpc, did not deliver those wpc at the same current as the another wpc amp did. Like the thread I had read, he made the same analogy to describe what he was talking about. He said a 140wpc amp running at a low current would be like 140 watts coming through a garden hose while another amp running at 140wpc through a firehose. The higher current amp is going to sound cleaner, louder and just plain better. From what Ive read and experienced in my research, most manufacturers dont post current in their specs. I have seen some that do though. For research's sake, Im trying to find out that particular spec on the Emotiva XPA5 before buying it. Im pretty sold on it, but would like to know just for S&G.

to me the fire hose garden hose would be good comparision for speaker wire...

12 awg vs 18 awg.. you want the 12 gauge stuff lets those watts amp s.. flow to the speakers EZZZ eh..

cheers
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post #917 of 2033 Old 02-05-2013, 11:21 PM
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to me the fire hose garden hose would be good comparision for speaker wire...

12 awg vs 18 awg.. you want the 12 gauge stuff lets those watts amp s.. flow to the speakers EZZZ eh..

cheers

On the amp, I would go 10 gauge..
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will be taking this pic into consideration... this guy has some really good utube vids out there..


Hi DeltaDube, Can you post a link on where to get these panels for Bass Trap? My current project will be starting in 2 weeks , Id like to get these before we start smile.gif Thanks in Advance
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On the amp, I would go 10 gauge..

If the gauge of the wire is sufficient for it's length, any further increase in thickness will have no effect. For most lengths 14ga. is sufficient. Personally I use 12ga as I got it on sale. There is a handy calculator of what is needed but I forgot where it is.
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to me the fire hose garden hose would be good comparision for speaker wire...

12 awg vs 18 awg.. you want the 12 gauge stuff lets those watts amp s.. flow to the speakers EZZZ eh..

cheers

If you feed a garden hose with a fire hose the garden hose will not output more water.

Running all those watts through 12 ga. into that 16 ga. in the speaker will explode those little wires. smile.gif

Flat wire is also better than round wire if you want a flatter FR. smile.gif
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post #921 of 2033 Old 02-06-2013, 05:10 AM
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I would hope you are being sarcastic, otherwise more disinformation as usual.
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post #922 of 2033 Old 02-06-2013, 05:34 AM
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to me the fire hose garden hose would be good comparision for speaker wire...

12 awg vs 18 awg.. you want the 12 gauge stuff lets those watts amp s.. flow to the speakers EZZZ eh..

cheers

If you feed a garden hose with a fire hose the garden hose will not output more water.

Yes.
Quote:
Running all those watts through 12 ga. into that 16 ga. in the speaker will explode those little wires. smile.gif

Joke, right! ;-)

Just to clarify, putting a few inches of slightly smaller wire at the end(s) of a thicker cable causes no technical problems and is a good way to solve problems with connectors that are designed for smaller wire.

Increasing the flexibility of a cable near its ends may reduce strain on the cable and whatever it attaches to.
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[*] A larger supply (bigger power transformer, diodes, and more capacitors) will not provide any more maximum output power.

True because most power amps are voltage limited, not current limited in actual use. You can make the same power transformer put out more voltage without changing its size.

Diodes are generally over-rated if for no other reason than that's how they tend to come.

Capacitors relate to filtering, but really small ones can hurt maximum power at low frequencies on the test bench. You cover this well in parts of your post that I clipped.
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- It is not clear that matters in the real world when most channels are essentially "idling", and even the main L/R channels typically only need a few Watts for most of the movie or music.

Excellent point.
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- Manufacturers take advantage of this by reducing power supplies to reduce cost. It may or may not be audible (is not most of the time would be my guess).

Agreed. Also,there are practical problems with producing a product that the average person can install without renting Charles Atlas or a fork lift! ;-)

The hidden agenda in power amplifier ratings is the fact that music has a high crest factor. For our non-technical readers that means music always has a far lower energy content than a pure sine wave or DC with the same voltage. The ratio of energy in music versus a sine wave is generally 2 or more and can easliy be on the order of 10. This is on top of the fact that the loudness of music varies constantly and usually is far less than its peak values. I suspect that a power amp that is running just below clipping on the loudest part of a recording is putting out less than 10% of that most of the time. Usually, far less.

Pile on top of that the fact that audiophiles generally don't have any relaible way of knowing what the peak power requirements of their system are. For openers, I would like to see AVRs have clipping indicators like most pro audio amps have.
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post #924 of 2033 Old 02-06-2013, 07:06 AM
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Thanks Arny, even a blind pig gets a truffle once in a while. Sometimes I manage to post something right. smile.gif

Good point on the crest factor. Long ago the accepted value for peak to average power in music was 17 dB, a 50:1 power difference. The past few years I have seen a variety of numbers, but generally speaking for recorded music I think the 17 dB is still holding true, 'ish. The crest factor seems to be much higher for movies; I have read here up to 30 dB (1000:1 power ratio). However you slice it, seems like most of the time very little power is used by the average listener/watcher.

+1 on clipping indicators on AVRs. Maybe they don't want us to know? smile.gif

"After silence, that which best expresses the inexpressible, is music" - Aldous Huxley
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post #925 of 2033 Old 02-06-2013, 08:35 AM
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I was surprised by the comment that amps are often voltage limited.

I always suspected that the onset of clipping worked a bit like this... (assume an AVR with a shared and moderate power supply)

* On a loud scene in a movie, you have a number of amps trying to amplify their signals to a high peak at (roughly) the same time
* The power supply voltage would have been sufficient IF it had not sagged
* The power supply voltage is sagging either because the caps can't hold voltage high enough, or because the transformer is insufficient for the current demand, and the secondary drops

I could be totally wrong here. But if this sort of thing happens, isn't it really power supply limited more than voltage limited? What I mean, is, isn't the voltage sufficient until it sagged under load?

I know that my receiver's supply voltage to the amp section is a pretty high 70 volts. More than sufficient unless it's sagging a lot under load.

I do recall reading that there were two ways to build an amp's power supply. You could either go the Harmon Kardon high current method, which looks worse on 8 ohm dummy loads, but is supposed to perform better into real world reactive loads. Or you could, instead, go with a high supply voltage, hopefully high enough that when it sags, it's still not clipping. I hope I explained that right. Been awhile since I read the articles where I got these ideas/

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post #926 of 2033 Old 02-06-2013, 11:33 AM
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The supply does not need to sag for clipping to occur; clipping happens any time an amplifier is overdriven. If the power supply was perfect and you applied too large an input signal the amp will still clip trying to deliver an output signal that is larger than the (ideal) power supply rails. If the rails sag clipping will occur at a lower power level.

Clipping happens when the voltage output (ignoring drop within the output devices) hits the supply rails. Of course current-induced clipping can happen as well but clipping is almost always discussed in terms of voltage since it is commonly assumed the ideal amplifier is an ideal voltage source that can deliver infinite current. At some point any amplifier can be overdriven and will clip. A lack of current capacity in the power supply can cause the rails to sag, causing clipping to come on early, but for short peaks (i.e. most of them) the capacitors in the supply will help hold up the rails. With low impedances and/or multiple channels the power supply might not supply enough current to "feed" the output, leading to voltage sag and clipping. Another factor could be output devices that do not have the current capacity to support full power as impedance drops, causing the output to clip earlier due to the voltage drop across the output transistors. Potentially coupled with a sagging supply rail, of course.

"After silence, that which best expresses the inexpressible, is music" - Aldous Huxley
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post #927 of 2033 Old 02-06-2013, 12:18 PM
 
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will be taking this pic into consideration... this guy has some really good utube vids out there..


Hi DeltaDube, Can you post a link on where to get these panels for Bass Trap? My current project will be starting in 2 weeks , Id like to get these before we start smile.gif Thanks in Advance


sure the main link is

http://www.gearslutz.com/board/studio-building-acoustics/610173-acoustics-treatment-reference-guide-look-here.html

i built my own traps tho its ez...

cheers
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post #928 of 2033 Old 02-06-2013, 12:21 PM
 
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to me the fire hose garden hose would be good comparision for speaker wire...

12 awg vs 18 awg.. you want the 12 gauge stuff lets those watts amp s.. flow to the speakers EZZZ eh..

cheers

On the amp, I would go 10 gauge..

if you have the need big amp and big power hungry speakers sure why not 8 awg...

cheers
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post #929 of 2033 Old 02-08-2013, 02:27 PM
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Looking to use Onkyo TX 706 Pre/Pro with XPA-5 perhaps...


Would there be a great deal of Sound Quality difference, or just subtle?

Movies/Music 50/50

Speakers:
HSU Hybrid 15 (with VTF-15 sub)


The quality build/reliability of Emotiva seems to get a lot of forum replies....any thoughts..?
thanks
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post #930 of 2033 Old 02-08-2013, 02:31 PM
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What RCA cables you guys using? I am using monoprice cables and I get a hum at lower volumes. It's not noticeable at higher volumes, but I would like to make it go away.
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