Equipment compatability (noob question) - AVS Forum
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post #1 of 8 Old 03-15-2012, 03:01 PM - Thread Starter
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Hi,

Today I stupidly bought a Yamaha RX V367 receiver. I've been looking for a few days for a surround sound system for my basement, and I bid on this receiver on ebay, and won it. Now, I figure I need some speakers.

I decided to ask here, where I suppose you guys understand this hardware quite well. Now, what kind of restrictions are there for the type of speakers I should look for? I read somewhere that certain receivers won't power certain speakers. If it sounds like I don't know what I'm talking about, it's because I don't.

Is it because some receivers are not powerful enough to drive some speakers? Or is it because they don't put out enough power? Someone please shed some light on this matter.

Thanks
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post #2 of 8 Old 03-15-2012, 05:39 PM
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Make sure the speakers are 6 or 8 ohms, not 4 ohms. A 4 ohm speaker will probably cause the receiver to go into self-protect mode and shut off. The other thing to look at is the speakers sensitivity or SPL rating. The SPL rating is how loud a speaker will play when measured at a certain volume, usually 1 watt at 1 meter. About 88 is average, 92 is on the high side with 85 on the lower side. Too low and the receiver will have to work harder to play at the same volume. But don't think that a speaker is better just because it's louder.
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post #3 of 8 Old 03-15-2012, 05:51 PM - Thread Starter
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An ohm is a measure of resistance, correct? Out of curiosity, how does that affect the speaker? Or does it not affect performance at all?
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post #4 of 8 Old 03-15-2012, 06:53 PM
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It is a measurement of resistance but I have no idea how it affects a speakers performance, if at all. It will affect a receiver however, and in a negative way if the resistance is lower than the receiver can safely handle.
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post #5 of 8 Old 03-15-2012, 07:45 PM
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I've run a few set of 4 ohm speakers with receivers. Sensitivity is more important in determining if a receiver can push the speakers to loud levels. As an example, I currently run 5 Emotiva speakers with a Yamaha A1000. And they get loud enough to make the movie experience fun. I prefer them to be a little louder for music, so an external amp is in the foreseeable future. The speakers are all 88db in sensitivity, so they aren't too terribly inefficient.
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post #6 of 8 Old 03-15-2012, 07:57 PM
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Quote:
Originally Posted by dublinus View Post

An ohm is a measure of resistance, correct? Out of curiosity, how does that affect the speaker? Or does it not affect performance at all?

Speakers don't have a fixed resistance. For different frequencies, they have different impedances.

The lower the resistance the speaker presents to the amplifier, the more current that flows, which puts more of a load on the amplifier.

"But this one goes up to 11"
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post #7 of 8 Old 03-15-2012, 11:16 PM - Thread Starter
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Okay, thanks for the answers, guys. Very helpful!
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post #8 of 8 Old 03-16-2012, 09:48 AM
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Quote:
Originally Posted by MichaelJHuman View Post

Speakers don't have a fixed resistance. For different frequencies, they have different impedances.

The lower the resistance the speaker presents to the amplifier, the more current that flows, which puts more of a load on the amplifier.

This.

Looking at impedance (which is stated as nominal; to see the actual overall impedance it will be a graph) doesn't really tell you much about the speaker's performance, but it does tell you about compatibility with amplifiers. With what you've purchased, 8 ohms nominal is where I'd stay (and that's the vast majority of speakers produced today). Yamaha themselves make a number of 6 ohm nominal speakers, which would also be suitable.

Just avoid the very low impedance options you might find from some place like Magnepan or MartinLogan (some of their models can get to <1.0 ohm; they all state this in their literature as a warning though).

To get an idea of loudness and wattage and what it all means, check these out:
http://www.physics.mcgill.ca/~guymoo.../lecture11.pdf
http://www.physics.mcgill.ca/~guymoo.../lecture13.pdf

And once you've read those, you'll probably want to do some calculations:
http://myhometheater.homestead.com/splcalculator.html
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