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chi_guy50's Avatar chi_guy50 04:56 PM 02-27-2014
Quote:
Originally Posted by Craig Peer View Post


I originally got my 4520 so I could run a 9.1 set up. And it sounded great that way with wide channel speakers. But then curiosity about what it would sound like with those other 2 channels got the better me. wink.gif

 

So dish, Craig.  Maybe you've already posted your impressions earlier in this thread; if so, please reiterate:  How would you rate your experience going from 7 channels to 9 with the 4520 and then up to 11?

 

FWIW, I was in a discussion with a BestBuy Magnolia showroom sales rep a couple of days ago about getting the 4520 and going to 11.1.  He thoroughly discounted the value of any speaker set-up beyond 7 channels.  Although I disagreed with his perspective I thought it was an interesting argument coming from someone whose mission is presumably to push product.



AustinJerry's Avatar AustinJerry 05:20 PM 02-27-2014
Quote:
Originally Posted by chi_guy50 View Post
 

 

So dish, Craig.  Maybe you've already posted your impressions earlier in this thread; if so, please reiterate:  How would you rate your experience going from 7 channels to 9 with the 4520 and then up to 11?

 

FWIW, I was in a discussion with a BestBuy Magnolia showroom sales rep a couple of days ago about getting the 4520 and going to 11.1.  He thoroughly discounted the value of any speaker set-up beyond 7 channels.  Although I disagreed with his perspective I thought it was an interesting argument coming from someone whose mission is presumably to push product.

 

Not Craig, but I went to an 11.1 configuration about a year ago.  I paid careful attention to make sure all speakers were from the same manufacturer and timbre-matched, which I think is an important factor in the resulting quality of the 11.1 implementation.

 

My thoughts after a year's experience:

 

- I don't care for 9- or 11-channel music.  I have tried DSX wides, heights, and both, as well as PLIIz, and Neo:X.  All modes add a level of ambiance that I don't think is faithful to the original recording.  OTOH, I do like PLII Music (either 5 or 7 channel--the latter is what you get with the 4520, and it is difficult to turn off the rear surrounds).

 

- For broadcast TV (i.e. DirecTV) 5.1 Dolby Digital, I always have DSX Wides+Heights turned on.  However, I rarely am aware of a significant enhancement to the listening experience.  I occasionally need to turn off DSX for some programs, because it adds unpleasant ambiance.

 

- For action Blu-ray movies, DSX Wides+Heights can enhance the experience.  So can Neo:X 11.1.

 

In summary, since 80% of my listening is either music or broadcast TV, I don't feel the investment in the full 11.1 channel configuration was a good investment.  Of course, this is one person's opinion, and I urge you to do some experimenting for yourself.

 

I am in the process of changing AVR's, and the new AVR is only a 7.1 configuration, so this shows you the value I place on full 11.1.  Now if I could only get the money back that I spent on those wide and height speakers... 


OzHDHT's Avatar OzHDHT 06:06 PM 02-27-2014
Quote:
Originally Posted by AustinJerry View Post

Not Craig, but I went to an 11.1 configuration about a year ago.  I paid careful attention to make sure all speakers were from the same manufacturer and timbre-matched, which I think is an important factor in the resulting quality of the 11.1 implementation.

My thoughts after a year's experience:

- I don't care for 9- or 11-channel music.  I have tried DSX wides, heights, and both, as well as PLIIz, and Neo:X.  All modes add a level of ambiance that I don't think is faithful to the original recording.  OTOH, I do like PLII Music (either 5 or 7 channel--the latter is what you get with the 4520, and it is difficult to turn off the rear surrounds).

- For broadcast TV (i.e. DirecTV) 5.1 Dolby Digital, I always have DSX Wides+Heights turned on.  However, I rarely am aware of a significant enhancement to the listening experience.  I occasionally need to turn off DSX for some programs, because it adds unpleasant ambiance.

- For action Blu-ray movies, DSX Wides+Heights can enhance the experience.  So can Neo:X 11.1.

In summary, since 80% of my listening is either music or broadcast TV, I don't feel the investment in the full 11.1 channel configuration was a good investment.  Of course, this is one person's opinion, and I urge you to do some experimenting for yourself.

I am in the process of changing AVR's, and the new AVR is only a 7.1 configuration, so this shows you the value I place on full 11.1.  Now if I could only get the money back that I spent on those wide and height speakers... 

I had somewhat of a similar experience when I got a tad excited and installed some height speakers in my system. Def underwhelming and didn't contribute enough to justify even the small investment. Similarly to AustinJerry's experience, I haven't missed going back to 5.1 in my room with the other AVR I'm testing at the moment having had gone right down 7.1 a few years back. Not to say I don't enjoy 7.1 in my other install as the room size and acoustics really suits the wall mounted ML motion series I use in it.
Craig Peer's Avatar Craig Peer 06:07 PM 02-27-2014
Quote:
Quote:
Quote:
Originally Posted by Craig Peer View Post


I originally got my 4520 so I could run a 9.1 set up. And it sounded great that way with wide channel speakers. But then curiosity about what it would sound like with those other 2 channels got the better me.



So dish, Craig. Maybe you've already posted your impressions earlier in this thread; if so, please reiterate: How would you rate your experience going from 7 channels to 9 with the 4520 and then up to 11?



FWIW, I was in a discussion with a BestBuy Magnolia showroom sales rep a couple of days ago about getting the 4520 and going to 11.1. He thoroughly discounted the value of any speaker set-up beyond 7 channels. Although I disagreed with his perspective I thought it was an interesting argument coming from someone whose mission is presumably to push product.

My experience is different from Jerrys, but my use is 85% movies, 15% HDTV and zero music ( unless movies like Singing in the Rain or Chicago count as music ). I have a theater that is wide and tall. I find the added immersion using NEO:X to be fantastic. Wides added the most, but heights add something too. Really depends on the movie. Good war / Sci Fi or action movies - especially films like Unstoppable - where things ( in this case a train ) go roaring across the front sound stage from left to right - the added channels just sound better. None of my friends have said meh - only wow. Watching Black Hawk Down or Apocalypse Now sounds far better with 11.2. YMMV.
DougReim's Avatar DougReim 06:19 PM 02-27-2014
I was also underwhelmed going from 7 to 9 speakers. I did like the front stage with DSX but to get that extra width I felt you had to give up too much from the surrounds. Now, I'm thinking about selling my wides. rolleyes.gif
Dreamliner's Avatar Dreamliner 12:41 AM 02-28-2014
Quote:
Originally Posted by Craig Peer View Post

My experience is different from Jerrys, but my use is 85% movies, 15% HDTV and zero music ( unless movies like Singing in the Rain or Chicago count as music ). I have a theater that is wide and tall. I find the added immersion using NEO:X to be fantastic. Wides added the most, but heights add something too. Really depends on the movie. Good war / Sci Fi or action movies - especially films like Unstoppable - where things ( in this case a train ) go roaring across the front sound stage from left to right - the added channels just sound better. None of my friends have said meh - only wow. Watching Black Hawk Down or Apocalypse Now sounds far better with 11.2. YMMV.
+1

I ended up with matching tower speakers for my wides and matching surrounds for my heights. It really provides 'wall of sound' imaging...I liked it. To Doug's point, I did bump up the 4 rear surrounds 2db after Audyssey. rolleyes.gif

I toyed with the idea of buying a 5 or 3-channel amplifier for my fronts and using the receiver for just the surrounds, but I determined the cost wouldn't net any significant gains. I used a Onkyo M282 100w 2-channel amplifier for my heights, worked out great, plus they are under $200. biggrin.gif
kbarnes701's Avatar kbarnes701 04:29 AM 02-28-2014
Quote:
Originally Posted by OzHDHT View Post
 
Quote:
Originally Posted by AustinJerry View Post


In summary, since 80% of my listening is either music or broadcast TV, I don't feel the investment in the full 11.1 channel configuration was a good investment.  Of course, this is one person's opinion, and I urge you to do some experimenting for yourself.

I am in the process of changing AVR's, and the new AVR is only a 7.1 configuration, so this shows you the value I place on full 11.1.  Now if I could only get the money back that I spent on those wide and height speakers... 

I had somewhat of a similar experience when I got a tad excited and installed some height speakers in my system. Def underwhelming and didn't contribute enough to justify even the small investment. Similarly to AustinJerry's experience, I haven't missed going back to 5.1 in my room with the other AVR I'm testing at the moment having had gone right down 7.1 a few years back. Not to say I don't enjoy 7.1 in my other install as the room size and acoustics really suits the wall mounted ML motion series I use in it.

 

Just as a counterpoint, I have height speakers in my system and I love them. Wouldn't want to be without them. Mind you, my HT is movies-only and, among others, I do enjoy a good rip-roaring actioner. I dislike DSX very much, but I love PLIIz and occasionally prefer Neo:X.  

 

I also think that the room and the rest of the setup plays a part. I don't have room for rear surrounds for example, which I would dearly love to have, so maybe the heights serve as some form of 'compensation' for the lack of additional speakers at the back. And my room is pretty small so maybe, again, the height speakers make up for a deficiency others don't have.

 

This is 100% preference land, so, as Jerry says, try it and see if you like it. (My original experiment was with a cheap pair of small speakers I had laying around - I put them in temporarily to see what the effect was, liked it, and replaced them eventually with some decent timbre-matched speakers.) 


kbarnes701's Avatar kbarnes701 04:35 AM 02-28-2014
Quote:
Originally Posted by laulau View Post
 
Quote:
Originally Posted by ss3740 View Post

I'm going to go down and put the latest update in and make sure my dynamic equalization and volume are set to off, as was suggested. I just can't figure out why it sounds so anemic.

Just some thoughts...
I'm going to respectfully disagree with kbarnes701 a bit and say that I have a feeling that your M&K B1600 Bookshelf Speakers aren't going to be all that efficient. If their FR is to be believed, 30Hz is quite low for a bookshelf with a single 6.5" woofer. To go that low with that sized driver in a bookshelf enclosure you have to give up something and Hoffman's Iron Law says it's going to be sensitivity. 

 

That's a great point and one which I had overlooked. I didn't notice that the LF was listed at 30Hz. I was going on the 'usual' M&K spec of about 89dB/w/m but of course that is for their THX spec speakers which roll off at 80Hz. If speakers as small as the OP's really do get to 30Hz then they will in all likelihood be as insensitive as hell.  Great catch there!


kbarnes701's Avatar kbarnes701 04:38 AM 02-28-2014
Quote:
Originally Posted by jdsmoothie View Post
 
 
As a reminder, the bass/surround boost of Dyn EQ decreases as the master volume becomes louder and approaches 0db (or whatever the Reference Level Offset is set to) such that at 0db it does nothing at all and as the volume continues to increase above 0db to +1db, +2db, etc., Dyn EQ actually works in reverse to decrease the bass/surround effect.

 

If anyone is interested to see how this works in graphic form, I posted some REW measurement graphs recently in the Audyssey FAQ Technical Addendum:

 

a)3. Graphs showing the effect of Dynamic EQ Reference Level Offset at various settings of Master Volume and RLO.


kbarnes701's Avatar kbarnes701 04:45 AM 02-28-2014
Quote:
Originally Posted by DougReim View Post

I was also underwhelmed going from 7 to 9 speakers. I did like the front stage with DSX but to get that extra width I felt you had to give up too much from the surrounds. Now, I'm thinking about selling my wides. rolleyes.gif

 

That's a characteristic of DSX. It drops the level of the surrounds by 3dB when DSX is switched in. If your unit has Neo:X, try that instead before you sell the wides. This futzing with the surround channels (it also decorrleates them as well as dropping the level by 3dB) is the main reason why I never use DSX any more in my setup (heights only, no room for wides). DSX gives a hugely front-centric presentation which, to me, spoils the envelopment bubble I have worked hard to create. In addition, DSX also reduces the level of the main L and R channels by 3dB too, presumably to make the wides more noticeable. IMO it's just a mess.


Patrick Murphy's Avatar Patrick Murphy 08:08 AM 02-28-2014
Quote:
Originally Posted by kbarnes701 View Post

That's a characteristic of DSX. It drops the level of the surrounds by 3dB when DSX is switched in. If your unit has Neo:X, try that instead before you sell the wides. This futzing with the surround channels (it also decorrleates them as well as dropping the level by 3dB) is the main reason why I never use DSX any more in my setup (heights only, no room for wides). DSX gives a hugely front-centric presentation which, to me, spoils the envelopment bubble I have worked hard to create. In addition, DSX also reduces the level of the main L and R channels by 3dB too, presumably to make the wides more noticeable. IMO it's just a mess.

That's interesting, Keith. I had known about the surrounds dropping but not the front R/L. If that is so, wouldn't going into the Setup menu>Audio adjust>Audyssey DSX>Soundstage, and dropping the wides/heights to -3, to restore the balance as a possible workaround? I've never tried it, but will later tonight as sometimes the wides are a bit over the top but I like DSX a little more than NEO:X as it seems fuller and more dynamic.
LRS3's Avatar LRS3 08:58 AM 02-28-2014
Quote:
Originally Posted by kbarnes701 View Post

That's a characteristic of DSX. It drops the level of the surrounds by 3dB when DSX is switched in. If your unit has Neo:X, try that instead before you sell the wides. This futzing with the surround channels (it also decorrleates them as well as dropping the level by 3dB) is the main reason why I never use DSX any more in my setup (heights only, no room for wides). DSX gives a hugely front-centric presentation which, to me, spoils the envelopment bubble I have worked hard to create. In addition, DSX also reduces the level of the main L and R channels by 3dB too, presumably to make the wides more noticeable. IMO it's just a mess.

I'm generally with Keith on this one. I have front wides plus 7 channels, and, surprisingly, only use Audyssey DSX for stereo music listening, not movies or multichannel music. DSX wides can help your sound stage when you're expanding stereo to 7 or 9 channels (it's all synthetic anyways), but the DSX-induced surround level cuts and decorrelation really mess up carefully-crafted surround mixes.

I have a Denon 4311 receiver, so I don't have DTS Neo:X. I really would like to try it, so that I could use my front wide speakers for movies. I'm sure my next receiver or pre/pro will have it.
chi_guy50's Avatar chi_guy50 10:31 AM 02-28-2014

Great discussion so far, guys.  I appreciate all the input, none of which seems contradictory to me due to the subjective nature of the issue.  I believe 11.1 and NEO:X will be my preference for BRD movies and am eager to try it out in the near future.


PoorGuy's Avatar PoorGuy 10:39 AM 02-28-2014
I have front heights and most of the time use DTS neo:x for movies. That I think is the most natural by default setting. I havent tweaked any settings. For music it depends of the genre. Techno, trance etc bass effect music I use Multi CH stereo, sometimes these effects, but at best it is with normal stereo. That causes the mixing of the original track. Female vocalist one can forget using effects... Maybe with live concert recordings you get something more.
kbarnes701's Avatar kbarnes701 02:51 AM 03-01-2014
Quote:
Originally Posted by Patrick Murphy View Post
 
Quote:
Originally Posted by kbarnes701 View Post

That's a characteristic of DSX. It drops the level of the surrounds by 3dB when DSX is switched in. If your unit has Neo:X, try that instead before you sell the wides. This futzing with the surround channels (it also decorrleates them as well as dropping the level by 3dB) is the main reason why I never use DSX any more in my setup (heights only, no room for wides). DSX gives a hugely front-centric presentation which, to me, spoils the envelopment bubble I have worked hard to create. In addition, DSX also reduces the level of the main L and R channels by 3dB too, presumably to make the wides more noticeable. IMO it's just a mess.

That's interesting, Keith. I had known about the surrounds dropping but not the front R/L. If that is so, wouldn't going into the Setup menu>Audio adjust>Audyssey DSX>Soundstage, and dropping the wides/heights to -3, to restore the balance as a possible workaround? I've never tried it, but will later tonight as sometimes the wides are a bit over the top but I like DSX a little more than NEO:X as it seems fuller and more dynamic.

 

It might. I'm not sure that the setting you mention is a dB adjustment or just a 'scale of one to three' type adjustment though. It's easy to test though.  If you have separate amplification it is instructive to play test tones through different speaker pairs and observe the levels when DSX is engaged or disengaged... it's quite surprising.


Patrick Murphy's Avatar Patrick Murphy 09:30 AM 03-01-2014
Quote:
Originally Posted by kbarnes701 View Post

It might. I'm not sure that the setting you mention is a dB adjustment or just a 'scale of one to three' type adjustment though. It's easy to test though.  If you have separate amplification it is instructive to play test tones through different speaker pairs and observe the levels when DSX is engaged or disengaged... it's quite surprising.

I don't know if it is either, although, I thought that I had seen it referenced previously, that it was in 1 dB increments but Googling didn't find any verification of that. Never the less, I lowered it to -3 last night and using some well recorded BBC Masterpiece Mystery shows, it seemed to work well. Pans ran from front to back nicely and the surrounds were more prominent. Need to try it with some Blu-rays to really test it, along with switching back and forth with NEO:X, but for now, it sounds better. Thanks for bringing this to my attention.

I have only the built-in amps (Onkyo 818) so I have to play it by ear.
Chise's Avatar Chise 01:04 PM 03-01-2014
Quote:
Originally Posted by AustinJerry View Post

Not Craig, but I went to an 11.1 configuration about a year ago.  I paid careful attention to make sure all speakers were from the same manufacturer and timbre-matched, which I think is an important factor in the resulting quality of the 11.1 implementation.

My thoughts after a year's experience:

- I don't care for 9- or 11-channel music.  I have tried DSX wides, heights, and both, as well as PLIIz, and Neo:X.  All modes add a level of ambiance that I don't think is faithful to the original recording.  OTOH, I do like PLII Music (either 5 or 7 channel--the latter is what you get with the 4520, and it is difficult to turn off the rear surrounds).

- For broadcast TV (i.e. DirecTV) 5.1 Dolby Digital, I always have DSX Wides+Heights turned on.  However, I rarely am aware of a significant enhancement to the listening experience.  I occasionally need to turn off DSX for some programs, because it adds unpleasant ambiance.

- For action Blu-ray movies, DSX Wides+Heights can enhance the experience.  So can Neo:X 11.1.

In summary, since 80% of my listening is either music or broadcast TV, I don't feel the investment in the full 11.1 channel configuration was a good investment.  Of course, this is one person's opinion, and I urge you to do some experimenting for yourself.

I am in the process of changing AVR's, and the new AVR is only a 7.1 configuration, so this shows you the value I place on full 11.1.  Now if I could only get the money back that I spent on those wide and height speakers... 
I been down that road before 5.1 good enough for me.
mnc's Avatar mnc 04:07 PM 03-03-2014
If the replacement doesn't come out until Fall, how long will the 4520 still be available? I know the 4311 stayed around for a long time after the 4520 came out.
Chise's Avatar Chise 05:05 PM 03-03-2014
Quote:
Originally Posted by mnc View Post

If the replacement doesn't come out until Fall, how long will the 4520 still be available? I know the 4311 stayed around for a long time after the 4520 came out.
The next one would probably HDMI 2.0 ready.
OzHDHT's Avatar OzHDHT 05:52 PM 03-03-2014
Quote:
Originally Posted by Chise View Post

The next one would probably HDMI 2.0 ready.

It would want to be or that would be extremely remiss of Denon, given their history of providing pretty much the latest standards and formats whenever they release new high end AVR's. Especially if a new model doesn't land, as speculated here, till Fall. I've also heard from a friend who's a local Denon/Marantz dealer that there's going to be an effort to delineate the two brands from each other, with the emphasis on the 'higher end market' being placed onto Marantz products and the Denon products unfort being steered in the lower cost AVR direction. Guess we'll see what transpires as the year progresses.
JohnAV's Avatar JohnAV 07:17 PM 03-03-2014
Shouldn't be any great effort to race out with HDMI 2.0 certified AVR's, as nothing else is ready. Still think 4520CI is a better buy then a SR7008 considering discounts and feature set. HDAM doesn't do it for me.
OzHDHT's Avatar OzHDHT 07:31 PM 03-03-2014
Quote:
Originally Posted by JohnAV View Post

Shouldn't be any great effort to race out with HDMI 2.0 certified AVR's, as nothing else is ready. Still think 4520CI is a better buy then a SR7008 considering discounts and feature set. HDAM doesn't do it for me.

Not strictly correct when you state nothing else is ready regarding HDMI 2.0. Displays and projectors are out, such as the Sony panel and projector I've got. Also the Sony FMP-X1 player works strictly with HDMI 2.0. I could use HDMI 2.0 compatibility right for that reason in my own system instead of manual cable swapping.
Dreamliner's Avatar Dreamliner 07:39 PM 03-03-2014
Without HDMI 2.0, will I have trouble with a 4K projector (once the drop in price).
JohnAV's Avatar JohnAV 07:56 PM 03-03-2014
Quote:
Originally Posted by OzHDHT View Post

Not strictly correct when you state nothing else is ready regarding HDMI 2.0. Displays and projectors are out, such as the Sony panel and projector I've got. Also the Sony FMP-X1 player works strictly with HDMI 2.0. I could use HDMI 2.0 compatibility right for that reason in my own system instead of manual cable swapping.
The Sony FMP-X1 player hardly represent any sizable 4k source solution to the marketplace.
Quote:
Video Specifications
Video Compression Resolution: 3840 x 2160/30p
Video Compression Resolution: 3840 x 2160/24p
Video Signal Output (Receiver): 2160p (3840 x 2160)
Those are all HDMI 1.4a/b attainable, not HDMI 2.0
OzHDHT's Avatar OzHDHT 08:52 PM 03-03-2014
Quote:
Originally Posted by JohnAV View Post

The Sony FMP-X1 player hardly represent any sizable 4k source solution to the marketplace.
Those are all HDMI 1.4a/b attainable, not HDMI 2.0

Go ahead try to use it with a non-HDMI 2.0 + HDCP 2.2 equipped display.. you'll get to enjoy 480p down-rezzed output fi you're lucky.. It may not strictly need HDMI 2.0 bandwidth, however it requires the HDCP 2.2 chipset that Sony has rolled out with it's HDMI 2.0 equipped displays and projectors. It's most likely that any new AVR's featuring HDMI 2.0 will support HDCP 2.2 passthrough as well.
AustinJerry's Avatar AustinJerry 09:07 PM 03-03-2014
Quote:
Originally Posted by OzHDHT View Post

Go ahead try to use it with a non-HDMI 2.0 + HDCP 2.2 equipped display.. you'll get to enjoy 480p down-rezzed output fi you're lucky.. It may not strictly need HDMI 2.0 bandwidth, however it requires the HDCP 2.2 chipset that Sony has rolled out with it's HDMI 2.0 equipped displays and projectors. It's most likely that any new AVR's featuring HDMI 2.0 will support HDCP 2.2 passthrough as well.

I don't think the X1 has HDMI 2.0. My X1 was completely functional, delivering 4K content to the X900 well before the X900 received the HDMI 2.0 FW upgrade in December. Of course it is HDCP 2.2, but HDMI 2.0? Don't think so. How can we tell for sure?
OzHDHT's Avatar OzHDHT 09:28 PM 03-03-2014
Quote:
Originally Posted by AustinJerry View Post

I don't think the X1 has HDMI 2.0. My X1 was completely functional, delivering 4K content to the X900 well before the X900 received the HDMI 2.0 FW upgrade in December. Of course it is HDCP 2.2, but HDMI 2.0? Don't think so. How can we tell for sure?

It's the HDCP that's needed for X1 operation. There's no existing information on the X1 that indicates what it's HDMI standard is coming out of it. Guess its a slightly moot point given you have to have the Sony HDCP 2.2 chipset that's married to the HDMI 2.0 input board..
JohnAV's Avatar JohnAV 09:31 PM 03-03-2014
Quote:
Originally Posted by OzHDHT View Post

Go ahead try to use it with a non-HDMI 2.0 + HDCP 2.2 equipped display.. you'll get to enjoy 480p down-rezzed output fi you're lucky.. It may not strictly need HDMI 2.0 bandwidth, however it requires the HDCP 2.2 chipset that Sony has rolled out with it's HDMI 2.0 equipped displays and projectors. It's most likely that any new AVR's featuring HDMI 2.0 will support HDCP 2.2 passthrough as well.
The first part is true, but I'm coming from a view that Sony's temporary bandaid for 4k fans is quite inadequate as a total source solution as a step up from BD media content. What i am saying is we aren't there no matter how much Sony, Samsung, LG and like crow about HDMI 2.0 ready. smile.gif

The HDMI 2.0 spec is quite broad:

HDMI 2.0, which is backwards compatible with earlier versions of the HDMI specifications, significantly increases bandwidth up to 18Gbps and adds key enhancements to support continuing market requirements for enhancing the consumer video and audio experience. New functionality includes:
  • 4K@50/60, (2160p), which is 4 times the clarity of 1080p/60 video resolution
  • Up to 32 audio channels for a multi-dimensional immersive audio experience
  • Up to 1536kHz audio sample frequency for the highest audio fidelity
  • Simultaneous delivery of dual video streams to multiple users on the same screen
  • Simultaneous delivery of multi-stream audio to multiple users (up to 4)
  • Support for the wide angle theatrical 21:9 video aspect ratio
  • Dynamic synchronization of video and audio streams
  • CEC extensions provides expanded command and control of consumer electronics devices through a single control point

Once again the AVR marketplace will play piecemeal allocation of incremental technology changes as they hone HDMI standards. When they start at least discussing "native" 4k sources that output 12-bit color and video up to 60 frames per second content let me know. wink.gif
OzHDHT's Avatar OzHDHT 09:45 PM 03-03-2014
Quote:
Originally Posted by JohnAV View Post

The first part is true, but I'm coming from a view that Sony's temporary bandaid for 4k fans is quite inadequate as a total source solution as a step up from BD media content. What i am saying is we aren't there no matter how much Sony, Samsung, LG and like crow about HDMI 2.0 ready. smile.gif

The HDMI 2.0 spec is quite broad:

HDMI 2.0, which is backwards compatible with earlier versions of the HDMI specifications, significantly increases bandwidth up to 18Gbps and adds key enhancements to support continuing market requirements for enhancing the consumer video and audio experience. New functionality includes:
  • 4K@50/60, (2160p), which is 4 times the clarity of 1080p/60 video resolution
  • Up to 32 audio channels for a multi-dimensional immersive audio experience
  • Up to 1536kHz audio sample frequency for the highest audio fidelity
  • Simultaneous delivery of dual video streams to multiple users on the same screen
  • Simultaneous delivery of multi-stream audio to multiple users (up to 4)
  • Support for the wide angle theatrical 21:9 video aspect ratio
  • Dynamic synchronization of video and audio streams
  • CEC extensions provides expanded command and control of consumer electronics devices through a single control point

Once again the AVR marketplace will play piecemeal allocation of incremental technology changes as they hone HDMI standards. When they start at least discussing "native" 4k sources that output 12-bit color and video up to 60 frames per second content let me know. wink.gif

There is def some contention about the HDMI 2.0 standard. Especially in areas like the quoted 18Gbps bandwidth capability. Many Sony owners are fairly certain(no one yet has been able to confirm) that the 'HDMI 2.0' chipsets in their displays and projs are 10Gbps only. This could prove extremely troublesome if products are released the end up utilising a full 18Gbps bandwidth for playback.

Let's wait and see what Sony's gen 2 4K player mentioned at CES does when it lands most likely later in the year, before we get too far into the HDMI 2.0 sources debate.

Also interesting to note Emotiva's back down from last months much quoted HDMI 2.0 capability. My guess is 4th quarter before we start to see any of the larger AVR manufacturers moving into next gen models.
Craig Peer's Avatar Craig Peer 10:28 PM 03-03-2014
This is why I didn't have a problem upgrading to a 4520 last year. By the time 4K / HDMI 2.0 etc. actually gets sorted out and there is enough 4K source material to matter - it will be 4 years from now ( most likely ) and I'll be ready to replace my 4520 anyway. I'm not jumping in at the beginning of a new format like I did with HD DVD's ( doh ) ! eek.gifsmile.gif
Tags: Denon Avr 4520ci Receiver
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