Help find a reciever - AVS Forum
Receivers, Amps, and Processors > Help find a reciever
conner22's Avatar conner22 11:39 PM 11-29-2012
I just purchased a pair of klipsch icon kf-26 what receiver should I get for these. looking to eventually build up to a 5.1

lovinthehd's Avatar lovinthehd 11:43 PM 11-29-2012
That would suggest either a 5.1 or 7.1 receiver. Now, what else are you interested in? Music mainly? Movies/tv? How about a budget? What would you like to connect now and in the future and how would you like to connect? What features in an avr are interesting to you? What avrs have you looked at so far? You gotta do some of the work....
Prime316's Avatar Prime316 11:57 PM 11-29-2012
Quote:
I'm not trying to take over the thread but I have the same need. I presently own a Denon 1613 and find myself having to crank the thing past 60% to even get the sound to fill the room. It replaced an Onkyo txsr605 but it doesn't have the amount of output that receiver had even though I feel the sound quality may be better.

I am wondering if I should step up to the 1913 for more power or go with a different brand. I'm running a 5.1 set up and I am 99% movies.

Thanks
conner22's Avatar conner22 12:00 AM 11-30-2012
Movies and gaming. Budget 500. Just a blue ray Xbox and tv of course. I don't have a 3d tv so that features out of the question I'm new to this so Im not sure what features I need. Pioneer vx-522-k is what I've seen that interested me so far
conner22's Avatar conner22 12:07 AM 11-30-2012
Features iPhone compatible, hdmi, at least 100-150 watts per channel
lovinthehd's Avatar lovinthehd 12:34 AM 11-30-2012
Quote:
Originally Posted by conner22 View Post

Features iPhone compatible, hdmi, at least 100-150 watts per channel

Why do you think 100-150 w/ch is what you need? Do you know how spl relates to the efficiency/sensitivity of your speakers?
lovinthehd's Avatar lovinthehd 12:43 AM 11-30-2012
Quote:
Originally Posted by Prime316 View Post

Quote:
I'm not trying to take over the thread but I have the same need. I presently own a Denon 1613 and find myself having to crank the thing past 60% to even get the sound to fill the room. It replaced an Onkyo txsr605 but it doesn't have the amount of output that receiver had even though I feel the sound quality may be better.

I am wondering if I should step up to the 1913 for more power or go with a different brand. I'm running a 5.1 set up and I am 99% movies.

Thanks

And what speakers do you have and what size room are you trying to fill? How did you measure 60%? Do you know if your volume is linear or algorithmic? Do you know the amp specs of each of the previous AVRs? How do you measure "power", do you know how much the difference in "power" between the two avr's you're considering translates to in terms of actual spl? How that applies to your room?
Prime316's Avatar Prime316 04:56 AM 11-30-2012
Quote:
Originally Posted by lovinthehd View Post

And what speakers do you have and what size room are you trying to fill? How did you measure 60%? Do you know if your volume is linear or algorithmic? Do you know the amp specs of each of the previous AVRs? How do you measure "power", do you know how much the difference in "power" between the two avr's you're considering translates to in terms of actual spl? How that applies to your room?

The room is about 1,400 cubic feet. The other avr was the Onkyo txsr 605 and I believe it was 90 watts per channel and the Denon is 95 watts per channel.

I come by 60% because that is the nu,ber the volume has to be in order to feel that the room is mostly filled with sound. Not necessarily loud but full of sound. By the time I hit like 70, things are really too loud all around so I really go from too quiet to too loud and no in between.

It's almost like the difference between being quick and fast. They are different but many inter pet them to be the same. I can get loud if I push the avr far up but I am not getting that room filling sound at lower levels really.

No, I haven't done any fancy tests on my room. I just know that the Onkyo as I remember was more room filling than the Denon and I cannot figure why that would be besides the difference in wattages. I have since been told that today's avr use a special algorithm that explains why I need to go so high to get sound in the room.

Oh, and the mains are Klipsch Kf-30's.
lovinthehd's Avatar lovinthehd 09:47 PM 11-30-2012
Quote:
Originally Posted by Prime316 View Post

Quote:
Originally Posted by lovinthehd View Post

And what speakers do you have and what size room are you trying to fill? How did you measure 60%? Do you know if your volume is linear or algorithmic? Do you know the amp specs of each of the previous AVRs? How do you measure "power", do you know how much the difference in "power" between the two avr's you're considering translates to in terms of actual spl? How that applies to your room?

The room is about 1,400 cubic feet. The other avr was the Onkyo txsr 605 and I believe it was 90 watts per channel and the Denon is 95 watts per channel.

I come by 60% because that is the nu,ber the volume has to be in order to feel that the room is mostly filled with sound. Not necessarily loud but full of sound. By the time I hit like 70, things are really too loud all around so I really go from too quiet to too loud and no in between.

It's almost like the difference between being quick and fast. They are different but many inter pet them to be the same. I can get loud if I push the avr far up but I am not getting that room filling sound at lower levels really.

No, I haven't done any fancy tests on my room. I just know that the Onkyo as I remember was more room filling than the Denon and I cannot figure why that would be besides the difference in wattages. I have since been told that today's avr use a special algorithm that explains why I need to go so high to get sound in the room.

Oh, and the mains are Klipsch Kf-30's.

90 or 95 w/ch is meaningless without the specs those measurements were taken with (at 1khz only? what THD? 20hz-20khz? all channels driven? just front two? RMS or peak? etc). A reading of "60" is not the representation of percentage of power, but rather relative loudness on most avrs now, it's a db scale and it's logarithmic rather than linear. What matters is if you can increase volume without significant distortion (which can damage your speakers for one thing let alone being unpleasant etc) and you can actually turn your volume dial on your avr to the point of distortion without even getting to "max". Think of generally that a 3db increase takes a doubling of power...that makes the difference between amps of say 80-150 w/ch isn't necessarily a big difference depending on the efficiency/sensitivity of the speakers and the spl you want to experience.
whoaru99's Avatar whoaru99 10:17 PM 11-30-2012
Needing to have the volume control at a relative high level isn't uncommon for modern AVRs.

It's not like back in the day when your old recevier was blowing out the windows at 3, but then pretty much maxed out of clean power at 5 or 6 on a 10 scale.
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