earphone plug modification on receiver - AVS Forum
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post #1 of 17 Old 12-21-2012, 09:59 AM - Thread Starter
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I am considering some major surgery on a relatively high-end Sony receiver, but the mod outlined below could probably be performed on receivers of any other brand as well.

When I insert the earphone plug, the speaker outputs are automatically switched off and the output is redirected to the earphone. I think that this is standard behavior for receivers. I haven't yet opened up the chassis, but it seems that the redirection is executed through a low-tech mechanical switch that is actuated by the earphone plug.

What I would like, though, is to keep the earphone plug always inserted, and to control the output via a relais (and ultimately through a wireless switch). The reason is that the rig is in my sports room, and I need to use the earphones when working out in order to avoid unnerving my family - but I always forget to plug then in at the beginning and out at the end of the workout. Hence I would like to dedicate a button on the ProntoPro remote control to that operation.

I am certain that such a mod will require some soldering, and I am prepared to do that (and potentially to risk bricking my receiver). Before I start tinkering with the receiver, however, I wanted to collect opinions and advice on (1) whether such proposition is feasible, (2) anybody has done anything like that before, and (3) what are the do's and don'ts.

Many thanks in advance for any input. Ah, if the above sounds totally stupid, feel free to bash me - I am flame-resistant!
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post #2 of 17 Old 12-21-2012, 10:19 AM
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Quote:
Originally Posted by aag View Post

I am considering some major surgery on a relatively high-end Sony receiver, but the mod outlined below could probably be performed on receivers of any other brand as well.

When I insert the earphone plug, the speaker outputs are automatically switched off and the output is redirected to the earphone. I think that this is standard behavior for receivers. I haven't yet opened up the chassis, but it seems that the redirection is executed through a low-tech mechanical switch that is actuated by the earphone plug.

What I would like, though, is to keep the earphone plug always inserted, and to control the output via a relais (and ultimately through a wireless switch). The reason is that the rig is in my sports room, and I need to use the earphones when working out in order to avoid unnerving my family - but I always forget to plug then in at the beginning and out at the end of the workout. Hence I would like to dedicate a button on the ProntoPro remote control to that operation.

I am certain that such a mod will require some soldering, and I am prepared to do that (and potentially to risk bricking my receiver). Before I start tinkering with the receiver, however, I wanted to collect opinions and advice on (1) whether such proposition is feasible, (2) anybody has done anything like that before, and (3) what are the do's and don'ts.

Many thanks in advance for any input. Ah, if the above sounds totally stupid, feel free to bash me - I am flame-resistant!

If you can, first obtain a service manual for the receiver in question. This can save you a ton of grief later on.

The low tech means you expect may or may not be what is actually used. Some modern headphone jacks use electrical sensing.

Augmenting the remote control functions of a modern receiver could entail modifying the firmware for the receiver.
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post #3 of 17 Old 12-21-2012, 10:45 AM - Thread Starter
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thank you Arnik. I believe that the switch is mechanical for the following reason. I use a 3.5mm Female to 6.35mm Male Audio Jack Converter for the earphones. When I plug in the converter, but do attach the earphones to it, the receiver goes mute. Since there is no circuit, I deduce that the switch is actuated mechanically. Is that a fallacy?
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post #4 of 17 Old 12-21-2012, 10:49 AM - Thread Starter
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The receiver in question is a Sony STR-DA5500ES. Any idea where I could retrieve a service manual? Google pops up a ton of sites - but I think that most of them are scams and I do not even want to click them since I am afraid that they will infect me with some malware...
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post #5 of 17 Old 12-21-2012, 01:08 PM
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The receiver in question is a Sony STR-DA5500ES. Any idea where I could retrieve a service manual?

I obtained one (without registering or anything else) at http://elektrotanya.com

The headphone jack is on page 32 and it is controlled by a relay. The relay is powered by the controller board on page 22.

When you plug headphones in, you unground a lead that goes back to the system controller board on page 22.

The logic that controls how the headphone jack works is no doubt coded into the system controller's firmware.
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post #6 of 17 Old 12-21-2012, 09:51 PM - Thread Starter
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Thanks, this is amazingly helpful! It would appear to me that the rub lies in the board depicted here. I presume that JL261 and JL263 are being physically disconnected by inserting the plug, and this triggers all that is needed to redirect the audio. Any suggestion as to how to go about the rewiring?


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post #7 of 17 Old 12-22-2012, 06:49 AM
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Another option would be to get a set of wireless (eg. Sennheiser) headphones and then you could connect the wireless transmitter to either a Tape Out or Zone 2/3 pre-out which would allow you to pass any analog connected source to the headphones while still retaining the main zone volume.

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post #8 of 17 Old 12-22-2012, 07:28 AM - Thread Starter
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Quote:
Originally Posted by jdsmoothie View Post

Another option would be to get a set of wireless (eg. Sennheiser) headphones and then you could connect the wireless transmitter to either a Tape Out or Zone 2/3 pre-out which would allow you to pass any analog connected source to the headphones while still retaining the main zone volume.

Thanks for your input which is appreciated. Unfortunately your suggestion doesn't work for me (unless I misunderstand your message). The main zone must be muted when the headphone is on, and unmuted when the headphone is off. Therefore, my goal is to exactly reproduce the behavior that occurs when the headphone plug is inserted into its jack - but using an additional relais rather a mechanical switch. My intention is to control the relais using one of the many available wireless solutions, and to eventually integrate everything into my ProntoPro software.
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post #9 of 17 Old 12-22-2012, 07:50 AM
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Right. So then use the Zone 2 or 3 pre-outs instead of the Tape Out.

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post #10 of 17 Old 12-22-2012, 07:58 AM - Thread Starter
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Quote:
Originally Posted by jdsmoothie View Post

...which would allow you to pass any analog connected source to the headphones while still retaining the main zone volume.

OK, I am starting to get it (slowly). But why do you say "any analog connected source"? Would that not work with digital sources (mine are all digital!)?
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post #11 of 17 Old 12-22-2012, 09:49 AM
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Tape out, Zone 2 and 3 only work with analogue sources with most AV receivers. You'd need to hook up all your sources you want to be able to hear on your headphone using analogue audio cables in addition to whatever digital audio connection you have now.

Connect a headphone amp or wireless transmitter to the tape outs, or zone 2 or 3 pre-outs. Select either an internal source or an analogue source in the main zone, zone 2 or 3 respectively. If you used the tape outs, mute the main zone otherwise leave the main zone turned off.
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post #12 of 17 Old 12-22-2012, 09:50 AM
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The vast majority of AVRs (ie. 97%+ to likely include your model) cannot pass digital audio to zone 2 so you'll either have to also connect an analog cable from the source or use an optical/digital coax ---> analog converter (eg. Apple TV).

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post #13 of 17 Old 12-22-2012, 10:11 AM - Thread Starter
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Ahhh... I am starting to believe that my original plan may actually be the less-painful option!
Which brings me back to the question: any advice for the rewiring?
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post #14 of 17 Old 12-22-2012, 10:45 AM
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Personally I'd find hooking up a couple of analogue audio cables much less painful than cutting traces, hooking up relays and risking "bricking" your receiver. You can't have that many sources you actually listen to while excercising.

JL261 and JL263 are the circles marked on the PCB traces, test pads I'm assuming, not parts of the headphone jack. JL261 is connected to the same trace that connects headphone jack's shield (ground), and JL263 is connected to one of the jack's two switches. JL262 is connected to the other end of that same switch.

The other switch in the jack is unused. JL264 and JL265 are connected to the jack's right and left audio, but I don't know which is left and which is right offhand.
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post #15 of 17 Old 12-22-2012, 07:46 PM
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Quote:
Originally Posted by aag View Post

Ahhh... I am starting to believe that my original plan may actually be the less-painful option!
Which brings me back to the question: any advice for the rewiring?

Really? Keep in mind that the main reason the main zone speakers are disconnected with insertion of a headphone plug is likely so as to avoid passing the 5-10W required to power the speakers on to the headphone jack which only passes roughly 1/1000W. Introducing 5-10W to the headphone jack will at the very least likely have you replacing your headphones and worst case bricking your AVR. eek.gif

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post #16 of 17 Old 12-22-2012, 09:43 PM - Thread Starter
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Quote:
Originally Posted by jdsmoothie View Post

Really? Keep in mind that the main reason the main zone speakers are disconnected with insertion of a headphone plug is likely so as to avoid passing the 5-10W required to power the speakers on to the headphone jack which only passes roughly 1/1000W. Introducing 5-10W to the headphone jack will at the very least likely have you replacing your headphones and worst case bricking your AVR. eek.gif

It is certainly not my intention to attach the earphones to the main power amp! Again, the intent is to just reproduce the actuation of the earphone switch with a potential-free relais.

But I see that there is only so much one can do by mulling over the theory. The next step is probably to take a look at how the headphone plug is attached to the video board. If it's just a matter of unsoldering a wire, I may go for it. If however all connections are through soldered pins, I will forego it - since that would entail cutting the board traces, which is going to be too tricky.
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post #17 of 17 Old 12-23-2012, 04:19 AM
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Understood. Please update this thread with the results of whatever you end up doing. Thanks.

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