Is it better to route devices through the A/V receiver or directly to the TV? - AVS Forum
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post #1 of 11 Old 04-20-2013, 10:19 AM - Thread Starter
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I may end up posting this also in the Flat Screen forum, as I suspect that the answer may depend on whether audio or video is more important.

I have a Satellite box, a Blu-Ray and an Apple TV.

I'm currently of the mind set that it's better to take each device's HDMI to the TV set, and then route audio back to the receiver. My thinking is that the video will be better from each of these if there is nothing in between the source device and the TV. I do know that many A/V receivers these days have video processing, but can they actually improve video quality over the source? Pioneer uses the Marvell QDeo, and Yamaha also boasts video upscaling, etc. But in truth, do these things really help or hurt the video?

Another post I came across stated that on the TV, a person will want different calibration settings for Sat and Blu-Ray, for example. If all signals are routed through an AV receiver, with only one output going to the TV, this is not possible.

On the other hand, I'm from the old school where we used to route everything through the receiver (well, often not the TV itself, but the CD player, the turntable, the cassette machine, etc).

I have purchased a Sony HX850 (a tremendous set) and want to make sure I'm getting the most out of all this great equipment.

Any comments or thoughts will be greatly appreciated!
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post #2 of 11 Old 04-20-2013, 10:26 AM
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unless you have an unusual TV, the HDMI handshake between the devices and TV will tell the device the TV is a stereo, two channel, system, and that's what the devices will send. So you will never hear a multichannel mix if you go to the TV first.
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post #3 of 11 Old 04-20-2013, 11:54 AM
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As mentioned above, you are likely only getting 2-ch stereo if you route audio through TV. Best case, you may get lossy DD 5.1 on certain TV but you will never get any HD audio.

Receiver's video processing can be turned off. So, you will not notice any picture quality differences.
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post #4 of 11 Old 04-21-2013, 03:32 PM
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That is going to depend on what video processing is in your TV vs. the other components in your system. TVs generally don't have very good video processing compared to other components. I'd run all HDMI into the receiver. From there you can either set the receiver's "source" to either pass the video to the TV for processing or have the receiver do it. 1080p will be passed directly to the TV if the TV is a true 1080p set. All other resolutions will be processed by the AVR and sent to the TV as 1080p. The receiver will process the HDMI audio stream and send it to the speakers. Some sources, like a blu-ray player, will have menu options to disable processing. Try it both ways to see what setting gives you the best picture. It may be that your disc player and AVR have the same processing solution.

HD-DVD = 94
Blu-Ray = 120 ( 24 Warner red2blu )
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post #5 of 11 Old 04-21-2013, 05:06 PM
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All new receivers can run the HDMI signal through them, untouched. There's absolutely no reason to go to the TV first.

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Of course, I got it modified with the TK-427, which cheeks it up another, maybe, 3 or 4 quads per channel.
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post #6 of 11 Old 04-21-2013, 05:24 PM
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Go through the receiver but only if it has pass through for video processing. On my Onkyo I needed a special code to turn off video processing since "pass through" didn't truely turn off video processing but I lost my on screen display of the the AVR.
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post #7 of 11 Old 04-21-2013, 05:36 PM
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Quote:
Originally Posted by johnnyvn View Post

Another post I came across stated that on the TV, a person will want different calibration settings for Sat and Blu-Ray, for example. If all signals are routed through an AV receiver, with only one output going to the TV, this is not possible.

In regards to this, most TVs, especially a higher end model like yours, have different viewing modes that can be tweaked, individually. I have a Sony NX810 which isn't a top end model but was a higher tier model when it came out a couple of years ago. I have 8 different modes that can all be tweaked to my liking, which means there's no need to use different HDMI inputs. When I watch a movie, I switch to the mode I have tweaked for movies, when I play a game, I switch to the viewing mode which I've tweaked to play games, etc, etc...
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Originally Posted by colour View Post

Go through the receiver but only if it has pass through for video processing. On my Onkyo I needed a special code to turn off video processing since "pass through" didn't truely turn off video processing but I lost my on screen display of the the AVR.

I'd also like to add that, I've had four or five different receivers over the past three years and upon switching between processing on and off, I couldn't tell much of a difference, if any, either way, on any of them. The only visual difference I've ever noticed between on or off is slight input lag when playing a video game.

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Of course, I got it modified with the TK-427, which cheeks it up another, maybe, 3 or 4 quads per channel.
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post #8 of 11 Old 04-21-2013, 06:10 PM
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Some people prefer to tweak their settings for each input device separately. In such circumstances, routing all video through the receiver for a single output to the display won't work. But, most people don't feel the need to take that approach. Plus, cabling things that way means no lossless audio from sources that offer it. At the end of the day, you need to try various setups and use the one that meets your particular needs and preferences.
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post #9 of 11 Old 04-21-2013, 06:24 PM
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Originally Posted by BIslander View Post

Some people prefer to tweak their settings for each input device separately. In such circumstances, routing all video through the receiver for a single output to the display won't work. But, most people don't feel the need to take that approach. Plus, cabling things that way means no lossless audio from sources that offer it. At the end of the day, you need to try various setups and use the one that meets your particular needs and preferences.

What sense does that make though? If the TV allows you to do all of the same things within each viewing mode, why would you desire using separate inputs?

Quote:
Of course, I got it modified with the TK-427, which cheeks it up another, maybe, 3 or 4 quads per channel.
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post #10 of 11 Old 04-21-2013, 06:46 PM
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What works for you may not be sufficient for someone else, depending on their equipment and personal preferences. I'm not sure why you are so insistent that sending all video through a receiver is going to meet everyone else's needs.
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post #11 of 11 Old 04-21-2013, 07:53 PM
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Quote:
Originally Posted by BIslander View Post

What works for you may not be sufficient for someone else, depending on their equipment and personal preferences. I'm not sure why you are so insistent that sending all video through a receiver is going to meet everyone else's needs.

If all of his equipment is HDMI equipped, there's no reason not to run it all through the receiver. That's what you buy a receiver for. The OP also didn't indicate he was trying to do anything special. If he had some weird requirements, it may not be the best option for him. But, going by what he posted, I can't figure any reason he shouldn't run it all straight through. He asked the question and I, going by his criteria, answered.
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Of course, I got it modified with the TK-427, which cheeks it up another, maybe, 3 or 4 quads per channel.
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