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post #1 of 6 Old 05-18-2013, 12:07 PM - Thread Starter
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So I have the vsx1522 and definitive technology 8060 towers, 8080 center and 8040 surrounds. I was curious as far as the towers do I biamping off wides or front height? As far as the center what would I biamping into and what about the rears?
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post #2 of 6 Old 05-18-2013, 10:42 PM
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The Bi-amp feature can be used but, it really adds very little to nothing in the SQ. To get the real benefits of Bi-amping you need an active external crossover. You cannot bi-amp the center speaker. The tweeter and woofer will both receive a full signal with this avr. The excessive signal for each will be dissipated in the passive crossover as heat.
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post #3 of 6 Old 05-19-2013, 07:37 AM - Thread Starter
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Appreciate the help.
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post #4 of 6 Old 05-20-2013, 07:06 AM
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While agreeing 100% on passive bi-amping not offering audible benefits, the crossover typically includes components that reject the out-of-band (LF) signal; it does not usually dissipate it as heat within the crossover (it could, but that would be pretty wasteful).

"After silence, that which best expresses the inexpressible, is music" - Aldous Huxley
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post #5 of 6 Old 05-20-2013, 04:45 PM
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Most passive xo networks have inductor, capacitors and resistors that store energy or control voltage. The inductor or capacitor can also filter out frequencies as a low pass filter and high pass filter respectively. If heat is not generated in this filtering process, where is the excess energy going?
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post #6 of 6 Old 05-21-2013, 06:44 AM
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Lets take the example of a very simple first-order crossover. In that case, a capacitor is in series with the signal to the HF driver, and an inductor is in series with the woofer. The capacitor's impedance is high at low frequencies and low at high frequencies. The inductor is the opposite, high impedance at high frequencies and low impedance at low frequencies. The amplifier looks like a voltage source (ideally, with infinite current capability).

The inductor thus "blocks" current flow to the woofer at high frequencies because its impedance is high, and the capacitor does the same at low frequencies to prevent them from reaching the tweeter. The high impedances reduce current flow so there is no effective power out of band (power is voltage times current). An analogy would be a battery with nothing hooked to it; without a load there is no current flow and thus no power dissipation (heat). Ideally no energy is dissipated in the inductor or capacitor, thus no heat in those components. There is stored charge, in a magnetic field in the the inductor and an electric field in the capacitor, but that is ideally lossless. There is parastic resistance etc. in the inductor and capacitor that dissipates energy but those losses are (or should be) very small.

Resistors may be added to attenuate the signal (e.g. to roll off a "hot" tweeter) or aide in impedance matching and they do dissipate energy, but that is usually a very small part of the crossover if even present (many have no resistors).

HTH - Don

p.s. I simplified and ignored parasitic and second-order effects as they do not cause significant dissipation in most designs and I felt the discussion beyond the scope of this post.

"After silence, that which best expresses the inexpressible, is music" - Aldous Huxley
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