Anthem MRX Receivers - 310, 510, 710 Owners Thread & Tweaking Guide - Page 119 - AVS | Home Theater Discussions And Reviews
Forum Jump: 
Reply
Thread Tools
post #3541 of 3547 Old 01-28-2015, 04:27 PM
Member
 
plouie10's Avatar
 
Join Date: Oct 2005
Posts: 79
Mentioned: 0 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 9 Post(s)
Liked: 10
Quote:
Originally Posted by skip61 View Post
Then what you should do is to move up the couch by 2 to 3 feet.Then use that extra space for your calibration.
Okay, but won't that be off because when I move the couch back, I won't be in the same place? Moving the couch permanently 2-3 feet forward is not an option.
Thanks
plouie10 is offline  
Sponsored Links
Advertisement
 
post #3542 of 3547 Old 01-28-2015, 04:43 PM
Senior Member
 
skip61's Avatar
 
Join Date: Feb 2007
Location: Montreal
Posts: 200
Mentioned: 0 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 17 Post(s)
Liked: 15
Quote:
Originally Posted by plouie10 View Post
Okay, but won't that be off because when I move the couch back, I won't be in the same place? Moving the couch permanently 2-3 feet forward is not an option.
Thanks
Then for your mic position for the backs get it as close that is possible of the 2 feet that is required.
skip61 is offline  
post #3543 of 3547 Old 01-28-2015, 08:34 PM
Advanced Member
 
kinglm's Avatar
 
Join Date: Jun 2007
Posts: 576
Mentioned: 1 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 75 Post(s)
Liked: 56
Quote:
Originally Posted by plouie10 View Post
Hi,
Just looking for some quick help on where to take the readings from for the mic on Anthem MRX-510. If you can see the attached drawing I have the surrounds speakers on 5.1 setup on either side of the couch. There is no room behind the couch or beside to move the speakers and there are walls and windows blocking, so they are stuck where they are. In the manual it says to have the 1st listing position in the middle and the basically in the corners of the 1st listening position. I can't do it for the backs as I can't move the mic any further back. So wondering if you have any suggestions as to where to position the mic for calibration.
I have a similar setup with the same constraints. I positioned the mic at three seating positions along my sectional couch and 2 in front using this guidance from an earlier post by Bob. Don't remember which post # but I saved this to guide me. I adjusted based on my constraints.

Try it and see how it sounds.

"^ Follow the guidance in the Manual.

The idea is to give ARC a chance to detect significant room response factors. The variation caused by the presence of people in the seats is not what ARC is trying to Measure. Things that affect the geometry of the room (doors open/closed), or the reflective characteristics of the room (curtains open/closed, projection screen down/up, rugs in place or not, furniture in place or not), or the relationship between the room coupling, speaker positioning/pointing, and speaker dispersal patterns (mic positioning) are what's important.

Use the stand to hold the mic, pointing straight upwards, with the tip at seated ear height.

Put mic position #1 at center seating. #1 is special as it's the position that sets the volume trims.

Subsequent positions should alternate either side of #1 . No two positions, whether or not sequential, should be closer than 24 inches apart (I use 30 inches). Include some forward backward spacing in the positioning as well as the side to side. For example, if seating is a typical sofa, you could have 3 positions spaced along the head line at the back of the sofa plus 2 more positions just outside the chair arms and shifted forward about the distance of the front edge of the sofa. Like this:

5............................................4
..\........................................./
....3..............1..................2

Adjust the positions as necessary to keep the tip of the mic away from reflective or blocking surfaces such as walls or tall seat backs. Raise the mic tip a few inches or shift the position about a foot closer to the screen to clear it away from a seat back. Try to keep the mic 18 inches away from walls. Do not stand near the mic, or in the line between any of the speakers and the mic while the test tones are playing. Often the easiest solution for this is simple to sit on the floor while the tones are playing.

The mic is omnidirectional. It is designed to hear sounds coming from throughout the hemisphere above the mic tip. To get valid readings it needs to be able to hear sounds approaching it from 360 degrees around -- and it has to be pointing straight up. (ARC applies correction factors to adjust for how the polar response of the mic changes with frequency).

The mic positions need to be spaced as described. The spacing is what allows ARC to detect variations due to room response (which vary in location) and distinguish them from the inherent output of the speakers themselves. Squeezing the positions together will produce poorer results.

The idea is to sample the listening area. You don't need mic positions to match seated head positions so long as you sample the listening area. The above positioning -- sometimes called an arc -- works well for one row of seating. With two rows, or a single seat, a box configuration is also good. Like this:


5......................................4


...................1


2......................................3

perhaps with position #1 just behind the first row of seating or at the single seat.

5 positions are the minimum, and for most small home theaters 5 positions are also ALL you need. I.e., the reason to add more positions is because you feel 5 positions doesn't cover enough ground to sample the larger seating area.
--Bob"
whodunnit and mazpri like this.
kinglm is offline  
post #3544 of 3547 Old Yesterday, 07:31 AM
Member
 
plouie10's Avatar
 
Join Date: Oct 2005
Posts: 79
Mentioned: 0 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 9 Post(s)
Liked: 10
Quote:
Originally Posted by kinglm View Post
I have a similar setup with the same constraints. I positioned the mic at three seating positions along my sectional couch and 2 in front using this guidance from an earlier post by Bob. Don't remember which post # but I saved this to guide me. I adjusted based on my constraints.

Try it and see how it sounds.

"^ Follow the guidance in the Manual.

The idea is to give ARC a chance to detect significant room response factors. The variation caused by the presence of people in the seats is not what ARC is trying to Measure. Things that affect the geometry of the room (doors open/closed), or the reflective characteristics of the room (curtains open/closed, projection screen down/up, rugs in place or not, furniture in place or not), or the relationship between the room coupling, speaker positioning/pointing, and speaker dispersal patterns (mic positioning) are what's important.

Use the stand to hold the mic, pointing straight upwards, with the tip at seated ear height.

Put mic position #1 at center seating. #1 is special as it's the position that sets the volume trims.

Subsequent positions should alternate either side of #1 . No two positions, whether or not sequential, should be closer than 24 inches apart (I use 30 inches). Include some forward backward spacing in the positioning as well as the side to side. For example, if seating is a typical sofa, you could have 3 positions spaced along the head line at the back of the sofa plus 2 more positions just outside the chair arms and shifted forward about the distance of the front edge of the sofa. Like this:

5............................................4
..\........................................./
....3..............1..................2

Adjust the positions as necessary to keep the tip of the mic away from reflective or blocking surfaces such as walls or tall seat backs. Raise the mic tip a few inches or shift the position about a foot closer to the screen to clear it away from a seat back. Try to keep the mic 18 inches away from walls. Do not stand near the mic, or in the line between any of the speakers and the mic while the test tones are playing. Often the easiest solution for this is simple to sit on the floor while the tones are playing.

The mic is omnidirectional. It is designed to hear sounds coming from throughout the hemisphere above the mic tip. To get valid readings it needs to be able to hear sounds approaching it from 360 degrees around -- and it has to be pointing straight up. (ARC applies correction factors to adjust for how the polar response of the mic changes with frequency).

The mic positions need to be spaced as described. The spacing is what allows ARC to detect variations due to room response (which vary in location) and distinguish them from the inherent output of the speakers themselves. Squeezing the positions together will produce poorer results.

The idea is to sample the listening area. You don't need mic positions to match seated head positions so long as you sample the listening area. The above positioning -- sometimes called an arc -- works well for one row of seating. With two rows, or a single seat, a box configuration is also good. Like this:


5......................................4


...................1


2......................................3

perhaps with position #1 just behind the first row of seating or at the single seat.

5 positions are the minimum, and for most small home theaters 5 positions are also ALL you need. I.e., the reason to add more positions is because you feel 5 positions doesn't cover enough ground to sample the larger seating area.
--Bob"
Can't thank you enough for advise. Re-did Arc following the suggestions, keeping mic out from high backed couch. Wow! what a difference. It was good before, but totally awesome now. I can't believe how much better it is now!! Thanks again!!
plouie10 is offline  
post #3545 of 3547 Old Yesterday, 09:30 AM
Member
 
whodunnit's Avatar
 
Join Date: Feb 2010
Location: Wherever you go...well there you are. Currently I'm here, but soon I'll be someplace else. But rest assured I'll be there at the time, but I'll be gone before you know it.
Posts: 165
Mentioned: 1 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 44 Post(s)
Liked: 61
Bob Pariseau's (sp?) level of understanding on how arc works, and how to measure etc. is superb. I wish we'd hear more from him. I used the same posts to refine my mmts., with great results. Kudos too Kinglm for bringing that back into the current "space time continuum" of the xx10 series forum. plouie 10...glad you're happy!
whodunnit is offline  
post #3546 of 3547 Old Yesterday, 11:07 AM
Senior Member
 
skip61's Avatar
 
Join Date: Feb 2007
Location: Montreal
Posts: 200
Mentioned: 0 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 17 Post(s)
Liked: 15
Happy for you that everything worked well.
I am also very satisfied with my MRX510 .
skip61 is offline  
post #3547 of 3547 Unread Today, 12:37 AM
Member
 
mazpri's Avatar
 
Join Date: May 2013
Location: ol Europe
Posts: 149
Mentioned: 0 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 31 Post(s)
Liked: 24
LFE without Sub

Hi all (i guess this is one for Nick)
About LFE handling. (not sure this wasn't somewhat discussed before).

We all know 2 subs are better than one. But what happens in case there is no dedicated subwoofer at all but rather anything north of 2 full range speakers. Will the LFE channel be mixed onto all channels where ARC finds capable speakers? even up to 7.0 in theory. Or will that be limited to the L/R fronts?
The manual says any channel that is switched off will be routed through remaining speakers, but the following paragraph about Sub says not exactly where that goes, compared to the other ones (center, surround, back).
mazpri is online now  
Reply Receivers, Amps, and Processors

Tags
Anthem Mrx710 , Anthem Mrx510 , Anthem Mrx310
Gear in this thread - Mrx710 by PriceGrabber.com

Thread Tools
Show Printable Version Show Printable Version
Email this Page Email this Page


Forum Jump: 

Posting Rules  
You may not post new threads
You may not post replies
You may not post attachments
You may not edit your posts

BB code is On
Smilies are On
[IMG] code is On
HTML code is Off
Trackbacks are Off
Pingbacks are Off
Refbacks are Off