Does "Speaker Size" in AVR Configuration Settings Affect Midrange and Tweeter Drivers, or Is It Only relevant to Bass? - AVS Forum
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post #1 of 4 Old 11-04-2013, 11:02 PM - Thread Starter
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Let me explain. I was under the impression that when you run self calibration of an audio video receiver and the mic detects even barely decent speakers it sets them automatically at "LARGE". This, I thought, only affects the lower frequencies - the woofers and the external subwoofer (not the midrange or the tweeter). My understanding was that if you manually override the AVR's initial guess and set them to SMALL - as most folks do to make their killer subwoofer shine - the AVR only changes crossover settings for lower frequencies - lets say below 250Hz.. The midrange or tweeter frequencies coming from AVR remains unchanged (whether you set to LARGE or SMALL).
Now I have a bet with a co-worker going. He says changing speaker size from LARGE to SMALL in my AVR configuration menu will affect both midrage and even tweeter sound for the worse. I can understand how the midrange part could make sense, but surely not the tweeter!
Is that possible? What do you think? He swears he read that BS in some online article and promise to email me the link.
In my humble opinion whatever my AVR sends to speaker over 250Hz is only used and split by the AVR and/or speakers crossovers, which are not adjustable. So, I dont think this theory of his is correct. Besides my AVR self calibration screen shows this message: "If you are using THX certified speakers of any size set this setting to SMALL"! ANY SIZE!
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post #2 of 4 Old 11-05-2013, 12:10 AM
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An octave is the interval between two points where the frequency at the second point is twice the frequency of the first. 40hz is one octave below 80hz - 160hz is one octave above 80hz and two octaves above 40hz.

Most crossovers are sloped at 12db or 24db per octave and affect frequencies above and below the 80hz setting with the sub playing an octave or so above 80hz and the speakers playing an octave or so below 80hz with both tapering off the further they get from the target 80hz. At the 80hz setting and a slope of 24db the main speakers would be playing sounds at 40hz but down by 24db. The sub would play frequencies of 160hz down 24db. Not very audible on either end.

As for the AVR crossover setting affecting sound quality - I don't buy that. With many low and mid level AVR's having a good sub taking much of the load in the lower frequencies helps sound quality by freeing up the AVR to power the mid and upper range and letting the sub do the heavy lifting. Lower frequencies (20-100hz or so) require much more power to produce the same sound level as the higher frequencies to reference levels.

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post #3 of 4 Old 11-05-2013, 12:54 AM - Thread Starter
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Knucklehead90 View Post

An octave is the interval between two points where the frequency at the second point is twice the frequency of the first. 40hz is one octave below 80hz - 160hz is one octave above 80hz and two octaves above 40hz.

Most crossovers are sloped at 12db or 24db per octave and affect frequencies above and below the 80hz setting with the sub playing an octave or so above 80hz and the speakers playing an octave or so below 80hz with both tapering off the further they get from the target 80hz. At the 80hz setting and a slope of 24db the main speakers would be playing sounds at 40hz but down by 24db. The sub would play frequencies of 160hz down 24db. Not very audible on either end.

As for the AVR crossover setting affecting sound quality - I don't buy that. With many low and mid level AVR's having a good sub taking much of the load in the lower frequencies helps sound quality by freeing up the AVR to power the mid and upper range and letting the sub do the heavy lifting. Lower frequencies (20-100hz or so) require much more power to produce the same sound level as the higher frequencies to reference levels.

So, there is no possible scenario when setting speaker size to LARGE (except without a power external subwoofer) can benefit the overall sound coming from the speakers?
Thanks
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post #4 of 4 Old 11-05-2013, 01:01 AM - Thread Starter
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I cant wait to see that article he promised to send me to prove us wrong.
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