Bi-Amping with AVR - AVS Forum
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post #1 of 7 Old 01-16-2014, 08:18 AM - Thread Starter
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I am trying to understand Bi-Amping with an AVR and have really only one technical question. I currently have both an Onkyo 3009 and Integra DTR 70.1 that I switch out from time to time when I am board and want to tinker but don't have extra cash to buy something new to play with. I am not sold on the sound quality difference when I do Bi-Amp my speakers with either of these AVR's but that's neither here nor there since it's only an opinion.

So I am more interested in knowing if Bi-Amping actually decreases the power to the front since you are using 4 Amp sections vs. 2. Since most AVR's Top power is rated with only two channels driven and is dramatically decreased when you power additional channels for surround. So if that is the case then adding an additional 2 channels and using 7 instead of 5 would put more strain on the AVR's AMP. So in two channel using 4 instead of 2 channels of amplification would also decrease output per channel driven?

I hope that makes sense teh way I asked it

I may be way off but anyone care to chime in
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post #2 of 7 Old 01-16-2014, 12:04 PM
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No, passive biamplification doesn't really add any power to the speakers-perhaps a tiny bit but not enough to be audible. It doesn't hurt anything either. Basically it is a waste of time.
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post #3 of 7 Old 01-18-2014, 06:42 AM - Thread Starter
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Thanks for the confirmation:D
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post #4 of 7 Old 01-18-2014, 08:38 AM
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The thing to be aware of is that the real power limitation is the power supply of the receiver. Since your receiver is set up for 9 channels, you probably have enough total power available to run almost any 5 speakers, except for some very low-sensitivity or low-impedance speakers.

As long as all of the power is coming from that single power supply, it doesn't really matter if you bi-amp or not.

The only real gain in power would come from using a separate 2-channel amplifier rated at 100 watts per channel or more to drive the front speakers.

This would take a big load off of your receiver, and provide better power for the front speakers.

Of course, this is only possible if you have preout jacks for the front 2 channels, which you apparently do have.
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post #5 of 7 Old 01-18-2014, 08:44 AM
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Quote:
Originally Posted by commsysman View Post


This would take a big load off of your receiver, and provide better power for the front speakers.
.

What makes the power from a separate amplifier better than the power from a receiver?
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post #6 of 7 Old 01-18-2014, 08:49 AM
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In general, a 2-channel power amplifier has a much larger more robust power supply that is capable of meeting much larger peak current demands and driving the speakers better.

That is one main reason why a good 2-channel power amplifier is much more expensive than most receivers.

Besides; adding an amplifier means the receiver can now use all of its power to run the OTHER channels and no longer has the front channels to load it.

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What makes the power from a separate amplifier better than the power from a receiver?
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post #7 of 7 Old 01-18-2014, 09:01 AM
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Quote:
Originally Posted by commsysman View Post

In general, a 2-channel power amplifier has a much larger more robust power supply that is capable of meeting much larger peak current demands and driving the speakers better.

That is one main reason why a good 2-channel power amplifier is much more expensive than most receivers.

Besides; adding an amplifier means the receiver can now use all of its power to run the OTHER channels and no longer has the front channels to load it.

You said the power was better. If the receiver drives the speakers competently, how would a separate amplifier provide better power?

Incidentally, on most movie sound tracks, it is the center channel that dissipates the most power. Why wouldn't you put a separate amplifier there?
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