Understanding LFE Attenuator setting on Pioneer Recevier - AVS Forum
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post #1 of 6 Old 05-07-2006, 08:08 AM - Thread Starter
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Now, I haven't got the sub in here yet but could someone with this receiver, or knowledge about this help me understand the settings here. Does the LFEATT 10 help protect my sub from being fried at low frequencies ?. Here is the quote from the Ownwer's Manual for VSX 515.

LFE Attenuator Setup

• Default setting: ATT 0 dB

Some Dolby Digital and DTS audio sources include ultra-low bass tones. Set the LFE attenuator as necessary to prevent the ultralow bass tones from distorting the sound from the speakers.

1 Select LFE ATT from the OTHER setup menu.
2 Use (cursor up/down) to choose the setting that you want.
• LFEAT 0 – No limiting (recommended setting)
• LFEAT 10 – 10dB of limiting
• LFEAT ** – No sound from LFE channel

I was wondering about this so that in whatever venture I pursue sub-wise I want to know if this setting would help the sub from bottoming out and the pros and cons of the settings.
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post #2 of 6 Old 05-07-2006, 08:16 AM
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You got it. Likely it will only be needed with certain material. You should hear distorted sound before anything really bad happens but of course some slams come out of nowhere. Certain test discs are set up to run really hot but you should be safe using Avia or DVE.
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post #3 of 6 Old 05-07-2006, 09:15 AM - Thread Starter
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Heard alot about those discs. I will have to get my hands on one when the sub project is complete. I was wondering about this since I have limited options to drivers for SUB use (even thinking about shelving this project and going for an upgrade on the drivers for my DIY towers). Check out the thread for "Building an HT driver using a Car Driver" and let me know what you think as it relates to setting the LFE Attenuator. Your opinion would help here alot.
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post #4 of 6 Old 05-07-2006, 09:46 AM
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Your subwoofer receives 2 types of low frequencies: derived bass, which is filtered from any speaker set to Small; and discrete bass, which is from the discrete LFE channel of any soundtrack that ends in ".1" (e.g., 5.1 or 6.1 soundtracks). Your receiver allows you to control each of those types of bass independently of each other. Consider yourself lucky.

When listening to 2-channel material, derived bass is sent to your subwoofer. There is no .1 channel. When listening to 5.1 material, derived bass and discrete bass are mixed and sent to your subwoofer. This can sometimes overwhelm the sub and make it bottom out, or even just be distracting when you're trying to follow important dialogue.

If you want to lower the overall level of the subwoofer, you can use sub level adjustment. But then you'll have deviated from calibrated levels and your subwoofer will be out of balance with the rest of your speakers.

However, if you feel that a particular soundtrack is sending too much bass to your subwoofer, then you can adjust the amount of LFE content being sent to your sub without changing the overall subwoofer level. That's what the LFE attenuator is for.

Unlike the subwoofer level adjustment, which lets you adjust the overall subwoofer volume level up or down, the LFE attenuator work in one direction: down. That's because you can't add more LFE than there is in the soundtrack, you can only attenuate (lower) it.

With less discrete LFE bass going to the sub, it will naturally become a little softer and keep your sub from bottoming out.

When you initially set up your subwoofer, I would leave the LFE attenuator at 0 (zero). IF you hear distortion, only then would I start to lessen the amount of LFE content being sent to the sub. Otherwise there no need to adjust this parameter.

Sanjay

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post #5 of 6 Old 05-07-2006, 01:15 PM - Thread Starter
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I understand the concept of it now. So generally it remains at zero unless you hear distortion. Now in the other thread about the car driver I was told that the particular driver had too high an fs and that would cause it to bottom out. Would the driver still bottom out at zero with a driver that has too high an fs and would it therefore be wise to set it to 10dB to prevent damage to the particular driver with general use ? I don't have much (if any at all) material that goes this low. I really just wanted to add a little more punch to the low region nothing big.
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post #6 of 6 Old 05-07-2006, 01:24 PM
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Like Sanjay recommended...If that is what you want then leave the setting at 0. You can always run your sub a few dBs hot with either the receiver sub channel level control or using a modest bump in the gain on the sub rear.
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