Can someone help me configure me crossovers and speaker settings given my equipment? - AVS Forum
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post #1 of 11 Old 01-26-2007, 12:06 PM - Thread Starter
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I have a sony str-de875 reciever. Klipsch RF-3 front, Klipsch SC-1 center, Klipsch KDS 1.1 bookshelfs for surround, and an old venturi subwoofer. Here is a link to the subwoofer I have(http://www.smarthome.com/8205.html)

Can someone help me find a guide on configuring crossover frequencies etc or help me figure out what these should be given this equipment? I currently have the following configured.

fronts set to large, surrounds and center set to small. Crossover freqs all set to STD. My sub has an actual crossover knob on the front so Im not sure what to set that to as well as what to set it to on my reciever.

Can someone give me some suggestions on what to set all my crossover frequences to as well as what to set me sub to on the reciever and also on the knob thing?

Am I correct in setting up my fronts as large and the rest as small? I have measured and set all my distances properly.

Thanks in advance!

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post #2 of 11 Old 01-26-2007, 12:31 PM
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No.

Set everything to small, try a 80Hz crossover to start. The x-over on the sub itself should be disabled or set as high at it will go. Then calibrate each channel to the same level using a sound level meter (procedures are online here or in your receiver manual).
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post #3 of 11 Old 01-26-2007, 12:37 PM - Thread Starter
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Should I also set the crossover for the sub on the reciever to 80hz?

| XBOX360 - headshotwi | PS3 - headshotwi |
| Klipsch RF-82, RS-62, RC-64 | HSU ULS-15 DualDrive | Onkyo PR-SC5507P| Panasonic TC-P65V10 | Emotiva XPA-5 & UPA-2 |
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post #4 of 11 Old 01-26-2007, 12:39 PM
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Most people prefer to have their subwoofer handle all bass, relieving the main speakers of the job. Each speaker you identify as small has the bass extracted and sent to the subwoofer. The LFE (bass sound effects) channel from multi-channel sources (e.g., Dolby Digital 5.1) will also be sent to the subwoofer.

So start by identifying ALL of your speakers as small.

The crossover setting adjusts how the receiver decides what bass to send to the subwoofer. A good starting point is 80Hz, and that is likely what your STD setting does, but see if your manual gives you more guidance. 80Hz is the crossover point mandated by THX standards.

One rule of thumb is to set the crossover at twice the lowest frequency spec'ed for your main speakers. But you don't really want it to get set much above or below 80Hz or you will likely run into problems. A range from 60Hz to 120Hz should be about the limit of what you try.

Meanwhile, since the receiver is already doing this crossover stuff, you want to get the crossover built in to the subwoofer out of the way. With some subwoofers you can disable the crossover or use an input that doesn't process the signal through the crossover. Failing that, turn the crossover on your subwoofer to the highest possible frequency.

After adjusting crossovers, re-check the volume balance for all your speakers and then do some listening. This setup may work fine for you, but feel free to play around.

With bass test tones at various frequencies -- available in some receivers but also available from calibration DVDs like Avia or Digital Video Essentials (DVE) -- you can see how bass response is going up and down according to frequency.

Moving your subwoofer a bit, adjusting polarity and phase, or changing the sound configuration of your room (closing doors, pulling curtains, adding stuff to the walls) can all affect bass response quite a bit.

Polarity and Phase can be very important. They adjust the relative motion of the subwoofer and main speaker drivers so that the two of them aren't cancelling each other out -- particularly in the vicinity of the crossover frequency.

A Sound Pressure Level (SPL) meter -- the one sold by Radio Shack is the one everyone uses -- will help you measure these variations more precisely.
--Bob

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post #5 of 11 Old 01-26-2007, 12:55 PM - Thread Starter
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Thank you that most MOST informative!

| XBOX360 - headshotwi | PS3 - headshotwi |
| Klipsch RF-82, RS-62, RC-64 | HSU ULS-15 DualDrive | Onkyo PR-SC5507P| Panasonic TC-P65V10 | Emotiva XPA-5 & UPA-2 |
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post #6 of 11 Old 01-26-2007, 03:49 PM
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Well, there are not many "real" speakers who can handle "Large" in a surround system.
Size isn't the only thing what speakers make Large or Small, but most speakers (even floorstanders) are set to Small.
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post #7 of 11 Old 01-26-2007, 07:55 PM
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Bob Pariseau View Post

The crossover setting adjusts how the receiver decides what bass to send to the subwoofer. A good starting point is 80Hz, and that is likely what your STD setting does, but see if your manual gives you more guidance. 80Hz is the crossover point mandated by THX standards.

This of course is good advice. But I just want to add that the optimum results might be different here since the receiver is a Sony. Probably every other receiver brand follows the THX spec for the filter slopes - unless they give the option for additional slopes. Sony never followed that - they have much shallower slopes. Seems that the crossover would need to be higher for a given speaker since it will need to perform at lower frequencies relative to the Xover.

Ed
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post #8 of 11 Old 01-26-2007, 08:48 PM
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Quote:
Originally Posted by ekb View Post

This of course is good advice. But I just want to add that the optimum results might be different here since the receiver is a Sony. Probably every other receiver brand follows the THX spec for the filter slopes - unless they give the option for additional slopes. Sony never followed that - they have much shallower slopes. Seems that the crossover would need to be higher for a given speaker since it will need to perform at lower frequencies relative to the Xover.

Ed

Cool! What an exciting world we live in.....

Ed, did they use the same shallow slope both ways? That is, will the subwoofer also be fed higher frequencies than might be desired?

For a lot of speakers and subs Sony owners are likely to have bought -- i.e., combos without a lot of overlap before they start distorting -- this could lead to the interesting problem of which you'd prefer to sound bad -- your speakers or your subwoofer.
--Bob

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post #9 of 11 Old 01-27-2007, 09:29 AM
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Bob Pariseau View Post

Ed, did they use the same shallow slope both ways? That is, will the subwoofer also be fed higher frequencies than might be desired?

Yes. Mesurements that I've seen reported for Sonys are always 12 dB/octave low-pass and 6 dB/octave high-pass.

Ed
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post #10 of 11 Old 01-27-2007, 11:33 AM
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Greetings,

I have the Harman kardon AVR635 receiver, NAD CI9060 AMP, Polk Audio speakers.
I have my front speakers bi-wired as well as my center speaker hooked up on the pre-outs of the HK to the NAD
Fronts: Polks Audio RTi12
Center: Polk CSi5
Rears: RTi8
surround backs:FXi5
sub : Velodyne CHT15

my question is: I hear a little bit of feedback from my speakers that are hooked up to the NAD. I notice it when there is no sound playing and the NAD is turned on. it's not very loud but it is distinguishable if i get close to the speakers. Is this humming normal?
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post #11 of 11 Old 01-27-2007, 01:40 PM
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Quote:
Originally Posted by mextarzan View Post

Greetings,

I have the Harman kardon AVR635 receiver, NAD CI9060 AMP, Polk Audio speakers.
I have my front speakers bi-wired as well as my center speaker hooked up on the pre-outs of the HK to the NAD
Fronts: Polks Audio RTi12
Center: Polk CSi5
Rears: RTi8
surround backs:FXi5
sub : Velodyne CHT15

my question is: I hear a little bit of feedback from my speakers that are hooked up to the NAD. I notice it when there is no sound playing and the NAD is turned on. it's not very loud but it is distinguishable if i get close to the speakers. Is this humming normal?

The humming is likely due to a "ground loop" -- current, usually 60Hz power, travelling between devices along the grounded shields of the cables, and eventually exiting through the ground side of one or more of the power plugs -- either the ground prong of a 3-prong plug or the more grounded side of a 2-prong plug. Along the way, this current plays havoc with your electronics.

A *VERY* common source for this is the feed wire for your cable TV. Disconnect the wire between the wall and your cable TV set top box and see if the hum goes away. If that is in fact the source, there are things you can do to eliminate it.
--Bob

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