"Official" Audyssey thread (FAQ in post #51779) - Page 194 - AVS Forum
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post #5791 of 72269 Old 08-18-2008, 03:56 AM
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Quote:
Originally Posted by aaranddeeman View Post

It is against the wall, like a couple inches from it.

It's fine. It's just that the centre is getting a bit of free low frequency boost from being close to the wall.
I wouldn't move it as you may find that Audyssey will record it as only being able to go down to 100Hz, or even 120Hz.
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post #5792 of 72269 Old 08-18-2008, 03:59 AM
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Regarding the Audyssey doesn't detect speaker X' problems, I have a theory based on some observations working with my large dipoles (MartinLogan Monoliths).

Even before having an Audyssey equipped device, I would measure my speakers and the room to tune my active crossovers. During those measurements (using ETF / R+D, REW), it was easy to see the effects on the impulse response that various speaker design and room induced factors had.

I believe some of you have speaker to room interface problems that smear the impulse response to the point of where the Audyssey algorithm can't measure a valid sample from that driver, which leads it to say it's not there.

Causes for this are highly reflective / refractive surface near the speaker or between the speaker and the mic. Things like shiny glass topped coffee tables are some of the worst, as they will create a secondary impulse well within the usual measuring window (10ms or so) which looks really funky on the impulse response.

Dipole or bipole speakers present several challenges, as their impulse responses are full of reflected spikes from the rear/side-wall reflections from their rear waves.
Again, depending on model and position, Audyssey will often claim an out of phase' for these classes of speakers due to weighting the rear-wave impulses (which are out of phase).

Other causes can be having the speaker too close to the edges of other vertical furniture surfaces, and those edges causing additional reflection points and diffraction.

Some repositioning of the speakers or treating the reflective surfaces in some way will generally clear this up (and improve the sound as well).

Look at the path the audio will travel between your speakers and the mic, look for highly reflective surfaces that are within less than 3 feet of that path (in all directions) and see if you can somehow attenuate the surfaces that are closest to that path. Rugs, fiber wall hangings, padded cloth furniture, etc. will all help.

At a minimum, moving the speakers (or the mic to another location) should be done before saying something is broken' with the mic or the receiver.
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post #5793 of 72269 Old 08-18-2008, 04:50 AM
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Quote:
Originally Posted by audyssey View Post

The fact that your sub trim is reported at -2.5 dB and the other channels are high positive numbers tells me that the volume control on your sub is too high. Usually, the LFE input bypasses the volume control. But in this case it may not. So, I would suggest turning the volume control down on the sub to the 1/4 point or so and rerunning MultEQ.
Chris

Chris, if Audyssey is 'balancing' the sub to the rest of the system, would it matter which way you turned the sub's volume control?
For the above example, turning the volume control down 1/4 way might give a sub trim as 0 db or turning it up 1/4 might give a reading of -5.0 db. But does it matter as long as the trims are within Audyssey's allowable parameters (I think I read here that 12 or 15db is what Audyssey allows; but maybe that's just for the other speakers and not the sub.)

Anyway, my first run gave a sub value of +6.0 db, I turned sub's physical volume control up and next run was +3.5db. I turned volume up and next run was +.5db.

In all cases I had the exact same amount of bass and it was too earth-shaking. My Denon 1909 is set to 'LFE' only. I love what Audyssey has done for my listening environment (I've never had such an enveloping soundfield and yet detailed) BUT finally ended up just turning my sub volume control down and I'm perfectly happy.

(I might add that when I first started reading this thread and people were reporting not enough bass that I was leery of buying an AVR with Audyssey. But I decided whether Multeq worked or not, Dynamic EQ and Dynamic Volume were the way to go. I'm glad I did...everything is fantastic but just surprised to find I had too much bass and I do love bass, just not the amount I was getting.)
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post #5794 of 72269 Old 08-18-2008, 06:57 AM
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Peter Galbavy View Post

Could both of you have problems with the internal cross over wiring in the front speakers ? Each driver may be fine, but what if one of the outputs from the cross over is out of phase - I would hear this as a really bad noise immediately, but then again maybe not in the drivers all covered a different frequency range...

The only sound I hear is the woosh going over my head I'm not sure how I would find this out... I only have a basic understanding of crossover wiring and I'm not sure what the relation to that kind of problem would cause tones to be made but the Audyssey mic not picking anything up.



Quote:
Originally Posted by David Aiken View Post

Is the front left speaker connected to the correct speaker connection. It may be connected to a pair of terminals that say Front Left but if your Onkyo has provision for 2 pairs of front speakers which can be switched between (Speakers A and B), do you have it connected to the wrong set of terminals for the front speaker pair you've chosen to run?

Yeah, absolutely sure. I just checked again to make triple sure I hadn't screwed that up heh.

Quote:
Originally Posted by JonFo View Post

Regarding the Audyssey doesn't detect speaker X' problems, I have a theory based on some observations working with my large dipoles (MartinLogan Monoliths).

Even before having an Audyssey equipped device, I would measure my speakers and the room to tune my active crossovers. During those measurements (using ETF / R+D, REW), it was easy to see the effects on the impulse response that various speaker design and room induced factors had.

I believe some of you have speaker to room interface problems that smear the impulse response to the point of where the Audyssey algorithm can't measure a valid sample from that driver, which leads it to say it's not there.

Causes for this are highly reflective / refractive surface near the speaker or between the speaker and the mic. Things like shiny glass topped coffee tables are some of the worst, as they will create a secondary impulse well within the usual measuring window (10ms or so) which looks really funky on the impulse response.

Dipole or bipole speakers present several challenges, as their impulse responses are full of reflected spikes from the rear/side-wall reflections from their rear waves.
Again, depending on model and position, Audyssey will often claim an out of phase' for these classes of speakers due to weighting the rear-wave impulses (which are out of phase).

Other causes can be having the speaker too close to the edges of other vertical furniture surfaces, and those edges causing additional reflection points and diffraction.

Some repositioning of the speakers or treating the reflective surfaces in some way will generally clear this up (and improve the sound as well).

Look at the path the audio will travel between your speakers and the mic, look for highly reflective surfaces that are within less than 3 feet of that path (in all directions) and see if you can somehow attenuate the surfaces that are closest to that path. Rugs, fiber wall hangings, padded cloth furniture, etc. will all help.

At a minimum, moving the speakers (or the mic to another location) should be done before saying something is broken' with the mic or the receiver.


I think this hits my problem. I have a rather large chaise couch and the chaise part of it is about 2 feet from the left speaker (smallish living room with a giant couch, I need to get rid of this thing but that's another problem ). My place also doesn't have much on the walls so I'm sure there are going to be lots of reflections causing problems.

I figured it wouldn't be an issue though since the drivers are above the seat of the couch. I'll try some shifting of things and report back.



Thanks for the suggestions all, sometimes this audio thing gives me a headache (HA!)

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post #5795 of 72269 Old 08-18-2008, 07:35 AM
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Quote:
Originally Posted by audyssey View Post

Hi Jeff,

I agree. For the benefit of the thread, SMPTE 222M (also referred to as modified X curve) has the following spec:

Flat to 2 kHz and then 1.5 dB/octave roll-off above that.

A variant of that makes it flat to 4 kHz and then follows a 3 dB/octave roll off

Yet another (rarely used) variant has a low frequency rolloff below 60 Hz.

The SMPTE curve was derived based on very specific listening room acoustical conditions including requirements for critical distance, volume, etc.

Since these conditions are difficult to match in a typical home listening room, the Audyssey curve is somewhere in between:

Flat to 4 kHz, then -2 dB at 10 kHz, then -6 dB at 20 kHz. Very similar to variant #2 above, but with a key difference being the double knee in the roll-off. That decision was based on very long experiments that looked at several competing variables including speaker directivity, critical distance, and perception of the balance between direct and reverberant sound as a function of speaker directivity.
...


I find that very high quality speakers like Aerial 20T's that I work on in a typical HT environment follow the standard (2kHz knee point) SMPTE 222M curve very closely with zero EQ and sound wonderful at the listening position. I personally have more respect for the applicability of SMPTE 222M in the home. Deviating from Dolby and other recommended recording studio setups seems like a mistake based on my experience.

Of course the db difference being discussed here between these two curves is less than the error possible with your microphones.
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post #5796 of 72269 Old 08-18-2008, 07:43 AM
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Quote:
Originally Posted by tocaje View Post

Chris, if Audyssey is 'balancing' the sub to the rest of the system, would it matter which way you turned the sub's volume control?
For the above example, turning the volume control down 1/4 way might give a sub trim as 0 db or turning it up 1/4 might give a reading of -5.0 db. But does it matter as long as the trims are within Audyssey's allowable parameters (I think I read here that 12 or 15db is what Audyssey allows; but maybe that's just for the other speakers and not the sub.)

Anyway, my first run gave a sub value of +6.0 db, I turned sub's physical volume control up and next run was +3.5db. I turned volume up and next run was +.5db.

In all cases I had the exact same amount of bass and it was too earth-shaking. My Denon 1909 is set to 'LFE' only. I love what Audyssey has done for my listening environment (I've never had such an enveloping soundfield and yet detailed) BUT finally ended up just turning my sub volume control down and I'm perfectly happy.

(I might add that when I first started reading this thread and people were reporting not enough bass that I was leery of buying an AVR with Audyssey. But I decided whether Multeq worked or not, Dynamic EQ and Dynamic Volume were the way to go. I'm glad I did...everything is fantastic but just surprised to find I had too much bass and I do love bass, just not the amount I was getting.)

That's kind of what I am expecting to happen as well. However, on the 1909, the minimum volume for the sub is -12.0 db I believe so the more room I have to adjust downward the better IMO. I tried messing around w/ the SW levels on the receiver while leaving the volume knob alone and even going from -2.5 to -10 didn't make much of a difference - still a ton of bass. So I am going to lower the volume knob and re-run.

Someone in the 1909 thread pointed out that if you use the QuickSelect presets you can save individual speaker levels for each one (there are 3 total). So what I will probably end up doing is re-running Auto Setup with the SW knob at 9:00 (1/4 of the way up) which will hopefully put me closer to 0.0 db as far as Audyssey is concerned. I will leave those global settings for all inputs other than TV, which I will lower manually and save to one of the QuickSelect presets. I use a UR (MX 500) anyway so instead of programming the Denon's TV/CBL input I will just program the QuickSelect button for TV/CBL.
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post #5797 of 72269 Old 08-18-2008, 08:13 AM
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Quote:
Originally Posted by umr View Post

I find that very high quality speakers like Aerial 20T's that I work on in a typical HT environment follow the standard (2kHz knee point) SMPTE 222M curve very closely with zero EQ and sound wonderful at the listening position. I personally have more respect for the applicability of SMPTE 222M in the home. Deviating from Dolby and other recommended recording studio setups seems like a mistake based on my experience.

Of course the db difference being discussed here between these two curves is less than the error possible with your microphones.

It's also less than the error you showed in your own data where our curve follows 222M quite closely given the mic and measurement tolerances. So, I don't think this is a big issue. Also, when the product is in THX mode then we recommend switching to Flat so that Re-EQ can operate as intended.

We know 222M and 202M quite well as Tom Holman (my colleague at the University and Audyssey co-founder) was involved in writing the SMPTE standards.

Chris

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post #5798 of 72269 Old 08-18-2008, 08:14 AM
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Quote:
Originally Posted by tocaje View Post

Chris, if Audyssey is 'balancing' the sub to the rest of the system, would it matter which way you turned the sub's volume control?

No, it shouldn't matter. In the other user's post, though, there was a 10+ dB difference between the sub and the satellites so I was simply recommending to change the sub level and bring the two in closer range.

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post #5799 of 72269 Old 08-18-2008, 08:19 AM
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Quote:
Originally Posted by JonFo View Post

I believe some of you have speaker to room interface problems that smear the impulse response to the point of where the Audyssey algorithm can't measure a valid sample from that driver, which leads it to say it's not there.

Hi Jonathan,

While it is certainly true that proper speaker placement can have a big effect on the resulting frequency and time response, this doesn't effect the detection of the speakers. Yes, there is time smearing of the response because of reflections and that is one of the key areas that MultEQ addresses as it measures and operates filters in the time domain (unlike parametric EQ that operates only on the magnitude response).

The fact that another pair of speakers is being detected fine in the same location would indicate a problem with the original speakers (wiring, drivers, etc.).

But, I totally agree with you that speaker placement and room acoustics should be optimized to the extent possible before running MultEQ.

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post #5800 of 72269 Old 08-18-2008, 10:51 AM
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Quote:
Originally Posted by audyssey View Post

The fact that another pair of speakers is being detected fine in the same location would indicate a problem with the original speakers (wiring, drivers, etc.).

That being said do you have any suggestions as to how I figure this out?

Right now I have three possible problems.
1. Part of my couch is too close to the speaker.
2. Wiring in my speakers/drivers are messed up.
3. Wiring to the speakers is messed up.

Moving the couch to see if that's the problem is easy enough. But if that doesn't get me to speaker detection do you have any suggestions on what I can do to see if it's the wiring or the speakers themselves?

(sorry if someone already mentioned how, this is my first crack at a receiver with Audyssey)

cheers.

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post #5801 of 72269 Old 08-18-2008, 11:06 AM
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Do you think any of those three problems can be fixed by running Audyssey? Have you tried a speaker forum?
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post #5802 of 72269 Old 08-18-2008, 11:38 AM
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Originally Posted by Gary J View Post

Do you think any of those three problems can be fixed by running Audyssey? Have you tried a speaker forum?

No, these appear to be possible symptoms of why the Audyssey calibration on my receiver isn't working. This is the conclusion of getting advice from this thread on why Audyssey was failing to find my left front speaker and I figured since that's what we concluded that maybe someone here would have a suggestion on where to go next.

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post #5803 of 72269 Old 08-18-2008, 12:07 PM
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Quote:
Originally Posted by srsly View Post

No, these appear to be possible symptoms of why the Audyssey calibration on my receiver isn't working. This is the conclusion of getting advice from this thread on why Audyssey was failing to find my left front speaker and I figured since that's what we concluded that maybe someone here would have a suggestion on where to go next.

Gary J was being facetious with his first question to you as above.
You're logic seems to be a bit off. Your speakers not being detected is the symptom. Another set of speakers was detected. That most likely rules out interference from the furniture or a wiring problem to the speakers or a receiver problem.
As has been said, you need to look at the speaker(s) that is not being detected.
That's why Gary J suggested you go next to a speaker forum.
Good luck.

to each his own...
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post #5804 of 72269 Old 08-18-2008, 12:27 PM
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How does using Audyssey (using MultEq XT and Dynamic EQ) for your subwoofer compare to using something such as an SMS-1 or DEQ2496? If this has been addressed in the past 194 pages, please just throw up a post or page number...
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post #5805 of 72269 Old 08-18-2008, 12:46 PM
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Quote:
Originally Posted by javajaws View Post

How does using Audyssey (using MultEq XT and Dynamic EQ) for your subwoofer compare to using something such as an SMS-1 or DEQ2496? If this has been addressed in the past 194 pages, please just throw up a post or page number...

From the Audyssey website - "How is MultEQ different from other equalization methods?"
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post #5806 of 72269 Old 08-18-2008, 01:17 PM
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Greetings, all!

My apologies upfront for what I'm sure has been covered before, but after several hours of reading, I can't find anything that covers my situation very closely. Also, I've done my own speaker calibrations for years, so it's a little difficult to just sit back and accept whatever Audyssey proivides.

I have an Onkyo 605 and I am using a Harmon Kardon HKTS 15 7.1 speaker set-up (not a high end system, but an excellent bang for the buck). All the satellites are coming back with their crossovers set at 150 and the sub is set at 100. The satellites are rated to 105 (-6 db) by HK. I'm torn between just living with it this way (it sounds pretty good), and wondering if I'm missing something (based on all the Xover discussions so far) and bringing down the levels for the satellites.

Any thoughts?

Thanks,

Mark M.
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post #5807 of 72269 Old 08-18-2008, 01:29 PM
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Quote:
Originally Posted by mrmbarrington View Post

Greetings, all!

My apologies upfront for what I'm sure has been covered before, but after several hours of reading, I can't find anything that covers my situation very closely. Also, I've done my own speaker calibrations for years, so it's a little difficult to just sit back and accept whatever Audyssey proivides.

I have an Onkyo 605 and I am using a Harmon Kardon HKTS 15 7.1 speaker set-up (not a high end system, but an excellent bang for the buck). All the satellites are coming back with their crossovers set at 150 and the sub is set at 100. The satellites are rated to 105 (-6 db) by HK. I'm torn between just living with it this way (it sounds pretty good), and wondering if I'm missing something (based on all the Xover discussions so far) and bringing down the levels for the satellites.

Any thoughts?

Thanks,

Mark M.

The sub setting that is 100Hz, is that the Low Pass Filter on Low Frequency Effects (LPF on LFE)?
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post #5808 of 72269 Old 08-18-2008, 01:45 PM
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Originally Posted by MBL View Post

Anyone knows if Marantz AV8003 is prepared for a Audessey Dynamic EQ update (as the Denons?). Thanks in advance.

Chris: Are you able to answer this one? Really appreciated.
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post #5809 of 72269 Old 08-18-2008, 02:36 PM
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Originally Posted by pepar View Post

From the Audyssey website - "How is MultEQ different from other equalization methods?"


Thanks for the link, but I guess I was looking for something a little more empirical and less techno jargonish.
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post #5810 of 72269 Old 08-18-2008, 02:36 PM
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Quote:
Originally Posted by srsly View Post

That being said do you have any suggestions as to how I figure this out?

Right now I have three possible problems.
1. Part of my couch is too close to the speaker.
2. Wiring in my speakers/drivers are messed up.
3. Wiring to the speakers is messed up.

Moving the couch to see if that's the problem is easy enough. But if that doesn't get me to speaker detection do you have any suggestions on what I can do to see if it's the wiring or the speakers themselves?

(sorry if someone already mentioned how, this is my first crack at a receiver with Audyssey)

cheers.

First try moving the couch. Try to have both fronts symetrical in their position in the room, and with similar objects around them.
Re-test (just the first mic position will do).

If the problem isn't solved, then, if only one speaker is not being detected, try swapping them and re-testing. If the error follows the speaker, then you know the problem is with the speaker.

If you are a little electronically orientated and don't mind soldering, then, making sure you know which speaker is the good speaker, remove the largest driver (speaker) from each cabinet. Don't detach the wires. Inside the cabinet you should be able to see the wiring including the cross oxer (some capacitors and coils). Very carefully compare the wiring in each cabinet. If the problem is in the speaker wiring, you should be able to see a difference. Re-wire the bad speaker to match the good speaker and screw the drivers back into place. If you don't feel up to this, then take both speakers to a audio specialist.
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post #5811 of 72269 Old 08-18-2008, 02:56 PM
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Originally Posted by MBL View Post

Chris: Are you able to answer this one? Really appreciated.

Sorry... this info has to come from Marantz directly.

Chris

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post #5812 of 72269 Old 08-18-2008, 02:59 PM
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Quote:
Originally Posted by srsly View Post

That being said do you have any suggestions as to how I figure this out?

Right now I have three possible problems.
1. Part of my couch is too close to the speaker.
2. Wiring in my speakers/drivers are messed up.
3. Wiring to the speakers is messed up.

Moving the couch to see if that's the problem is easy enough. But if that doesn't get me to speaker detection do you have any suggestions on what I can do to see if it's the wiring or the speakers themselves?

(sorry if someone already mentioned how, this is my first crack at a receiver with Audyssey)

cheers.

Hi,

#1 has no effect on detection. It will have an effect on calibration and that part of the couch should be avoided when measuring.

I still think it's blown drivers and the only way to determine that is to play wideband pink noise from a CD and listen. Ideally, you would hook up one of these and the other speakers that worked fine and listen for big holes in the response.

Chris

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post #5813 of 72269 Old 08-18-2008, 03:03 PM
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Quote:
Originally Posted by mrmbarrington View Post

Greetings, all!

My apologies upfront for what I'm sure has been covered before, but after several hours of reading, I can't find anything that covers my situation very closely. Also, I've done my own speaker calibrations for years, so it's a little difficult to just sit back and accept whatever Audyssey proivides.

I have an Onkyo 605 and I am using a Harmon Kardon HKTS 15 7.1 speaker set-up (not a high end system, but an excellent bang for the buck). All the satellites are coming back with their crossovers set at 150 and the sub is set at 100. The satellites are rated to 105 (-6 db) by HK. I'm torn between just living with it this way (it sounds pretty good), and wondering if I'm missing something (based on all the Xover discussions so far) and bringing down the levels for the satellites.

Any thoughts?

Thanks,

Mark M.

Hi Mark,

It's not unusual to find a different roll-off point for speakers actually measured in the room. That's the whole point of measuring and not going by the manufacturer's specs that are usually given for ideal placement conditions.

You can bring down the xover frequencies, but you will be giving up MultEQ correction below what it found to be the -3 dB point (150 Hz in your case). It doesn't disappear right away, but decreases gradually so you may not even notice it. But if it sounds good, then why change it?

Also, with speakers this small it is better to give more work to the powered sub. It's also better for MultEQ because the sub filter it creates has 8x more resolution than the main channels speakers.

Chris

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post #5814 of 72269 Old 08-18-2008, 03:09 PM
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Originally Posted by javajaws View Post

How does using Audyssey (using MultEq XT and Dynamic EQ) for your subwoofer compare to using something such as an SMS-1 or DEQ2496? If this has been addressed in the past 194 pages, please just throw up a post or page number...

There are two basic (and many more esoteric) differences in MultEQ:

1) the way it captures data in the room and combines the multiple measurements in the time domain

2) the way it generates the room correction filters to give the proper weighting to the most important problems found from the measurements

The other methods use parametric EQ that has several shortcomings including the types of filters it uses and what they can do to phase. Also, most parametric EQ methods do not have a way to combine multiple room positions and weigh them appropriately

Dynamic EQ is a technology that addresses the problem of loudness compensation. It uses the MultEQ measurements to calculate absolute sound pressure level in your room for your system and then constantly adjusts the frequency response depending on the content it sees. The adjustments are designed to provide the same tonal balance and surround impression that you can now only get when playing at ear-splitting reference level.

Chris

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post #5815 of 72269 Old 08-18-2008, 03:31 PM
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Chris, if Audyssey is 'balancing' the sub to the rest of the system, would it matter which way you turned the sub's volume control?
For the above example, turning the volume control down 1/4 way might give a sub trim as 0 db or turning it up 1/4 might give a reading of -5.0 db. But does it matter as long as the trims are within Audyssey's allowable parameters (I think I read here that 12 or 15db is what Audyssey allows; but maybe that's just for the other speakers and not the sub.)

Anyway, my first run gave a sub value of +6.0 db, I turned sub's physical volume control up and next run was +3.5db. I turned volume up and next run was +.5db.

In all cases I had the exact same amount of bass and it was too earth-shaking. My Denon 1909 is set to 'LFE' only. I love what Audyssey has done for my listening environment (I've never had such an enveloping soundfield and yet detailed) BUT finally ended up just turning my sub volume control down and I'm perfectly happy.

(I might add that when I first started reading this thread and people were reporting not enough bass that I was leery of buying an AVR with Audyssey. But I decided whether Multeq worked or not, Dynamic EQ and Dynamic Volume were the way to go. I'm glad I did...everything is fantastic but just surprised to find I had too much bass and I do love bass, just not the amount I was getting.)

So I re-ran Auto Setup on my Denon 1909. At first I turned the SW volume knob to the 1/4 position and after running through setup, it came up w/ the SW trim at +12.0 (vs. -2.5 at 12:00 before). That seemed way too high to me so I re-ran it again with the volume knob kind of in between the two previous positions. This time the SW came back at +1.0 which seemed more reasonable.

Here are all of the levels:

FL: +6.0 (was +5.5)
FR: +5.5 (was +5.0)
C: +7.0 (was +8.0)
SW: +1.0 (was -2.5)
SL: +5.0 (was +5.0)
SR: +3.5 (was +3.0)

Distances were virtually identical in both cases.

Crossovers for fronts and center still at 150Hz and surrounds at 110Hz (vs. 120Hz before)

Bass still seemed a little "boomy" w/ Dynamic Volume (Evening) turned on for Cable so I lowered the SW trim to -4.0 (from +1.0) - seems to sound a little better to me. For my other sources I am going to leave it as is.

One neat thing I noticed on the Denon, as soon as I tweaked any of the levels off of the Auto Setup levels, the border around the "Audyssey MultEQ" indicator on the display went away. As soon I as tweaked the SW back to +1.0 it came back. So I guess that means MultEq is working, just not 100% the way it wants to?

Will have to spend some time w/ it to see if I like the sound.

One random question? If I go into the Denon setup and say re-adjust the distances, crossovers and channel levels to exactly the way they were before, does it put the system exactly the way it was before? In other words are there any behind the scenes settings that Audyssey performs that you can't tweak? Just curious.

Thanks
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post #5816 of 72269 Old 08-18-2008, 03:48 PM
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Prepar,

Yes, the LPF on the LFE is 100. Thanks for the interest and looking forward to your thoughts.

Chris,

Thanks very much for the reply. I guess I just a "tweaker" at heart and think I can usually make things better.

Thanks,

Mark M.
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post #5817 of 72269 Old 08-18-2008, 06:09 PM
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Hi,

#1 has no effect on detection. It will have an effect on calibration and that part of the couch should be avoided when measuring.

I still think it's blown drivers and the only way to determine that is to play wideband pink noise from a CD and listen. Ideally, you would hook up one of these and the other speakers that worked fine and listen for big holes in the response.

Chris

DING DING DING.

Swapped the speakers as Nordo suggested and it went through the whole test this time unable to find the right speaker. Looks like I know what to do from here. Thanks everyone.

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post #5818 of 72269 Old 08-18-2008, 06:45 PM
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There are two basic (and many more esoteric) differences in MultEQ:

1) the way it captures data in the room and combines the multiple measurements in the time domain

2) the way it generates the room correction filters to give the proper weighting to the most important problems found from the measurements

The other methods use parametric EQ that has several shortcomings including the types of filters it uses and what they can do to phase. Also, most parametric EQ methods do not have a way to combine multiple room positions and weigh them appropriately

Dynamic EQ is a technology that addresses the problem of loudness compensation. It uses the MultEQ measurements to calculate absolute sound pressure level in your room for your system and then constantly adjusts the frequency response depending on the content it sees. The adjustments are designed to provide the same tonal balance and surround impression that you can now only get when playing at ear-splitting reference level.

Chris


Does it have any sort of SSF below 20Hz. Even the SMS-1 for years had a hard SSF set at 18Hz. Which sucks for anyone doing high SPL into single digit frequences but on the other hand anyone building sub systems will need a protect filter down low to protect the drivers.

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post #5819 of 72269 Old 08-18-2008, 08:49 PM
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Originally Posted by penngray View Post

Does it have any sort of SSF below 20Hz. Even the SMS-1 for years had a hard SSF set at 18Hz. Which sucks for anyone doing high SPL into single digit frequences but on the other hand anyone building sub systems will need a protect filter down low to protect the drivers.

There is no built-in subsonic filter. But MultEQ does measure the capabilities of the driver on the low end and it will not boost beyond the limits it finds.
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post #5820 of 72269 Old 08-19-2008, 12:17 AM
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There is no built-in subsonic filter. But MultEQ does measure the capabilities of the driver on the low end and it will not boost beyond the limits it finds.
Chris

Thats good to know,i was going to ask that question myself.
I have an IB subbass system & have just changed to a pre pro (denon avp a1-hd) with multeq xt,so far i'm really impressed with how Audyssey has dealt with the bass performance.

I am now wondering if it is worth investing in the pro kit to enhance Audyssey performance even further,any advice or experiences would be appreciated.

Many thanks to Chris for answering all our questions in this invaluable thread
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