The Official Onkyo TX-SR705 Thread (FAQ in 1st Post) - Page 298 - AVS | Home Theater Discussions And Reviews
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post #8911 of 8916 Unread 03-10-2015, 10:10 AM
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Bi Amping

Greetings!

I finally bought some tower speakers that can be bi amped. My question is what is the RMS per channel on this receiver utilizing 5.1 and 7.1? What will the RMS be if I use only 5.1 but bi amp the towers? Is there any benefit to bi amping? I assume so. I've estimated the RMS on just a 5.1 configuration would be roughly 20watts RMS, if Bi amp I've estimated the RMS watts at roughly 15, so in theory if I bi amp the towers the tweeters and mids will be receiving 15 watts RMS each or 30 watts RMS total versus not bi amping and just using 5.1 with the towers running off of just the front speaker posts getting 20 watts RMS. Does this sound right?
Thanks.
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post #8912 of 8916 Unread 03-10-2015, 11:05 AM
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Quote:
Originally Posted by daddyjer View Post
Greetings!

I finally bought some tower speakers that can be bi amped. My question is what is the RMS per channel on this receiver utilizing 5.1 and 7.1? What will the RMS be if I use only 5.1 but bi amp the towers? Is there any benefit to bi amping? I assume so. I've estimated the RMS on just a 5.1 configuration would be roughly 20watts RMS, if Bi amp I've estimated the RMS watts at roughly 15, so in theory if I bi amp the towers the tweeters and mids will be receiving 15 watts RMS each or 30 watts RMS total versus not bi amping and just using 5.1 with the towers running off of just the front speaker posts getting 20 watts RMS. Does this sound right?
Thanks.
Hello and welcome. Unfortunately bi-amping off a receiver will do nothing to increase power. A receiver has 1 power supply so you are correct that the more channels you run the less power per channel is output, so that basically explains bi-amping as well. You will get twice the channels but overall output will be halved. If you have the 705 it has pre-outs, getting a decent power amp is the only way to increase power.
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post #8913 of 8916 Unread 03-14-2015, 08:18 PM
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I think I'm with Robbie on this one, too; I also thought about "passive bi-amping" or "bi-wiring" (which is what you're describing, when you're using a receiver's unused channels to "feed" bi-ampable speakers) as I am running massive Polk RTi12's off an Onkyo 605 (the speakers and receiver are bi-amping capable)...but as it was explained to me, and as Robbie touched on above, there's no real sonic advantage to this (I have not personally physically tried it though) because you're still tapping off the receiver's common power supply; nothing's really "getting more powerful" if you catch my drift...


The idea behind this "bi-amping" (or wiring) concept -- and what the receiver manufacturers and some outlets such as Crutchfield attempt to hype to unbelievable levels -- was that by re-purposing the back surround channels of a 7.1 receiver if you're running a 5.1 setup, your FRONT main channels can get fed more power if they're bi-ampable. As I said, I never actually experimented with this but after it was explained to me that it basically "does nothing" (you need a whole different kind of complex setup if you really want to bi-wire/amp, wherein separate amplifiers are designated to drive the high and low portions of your loudspeakers...very complex, as I said) I didn't waste my time or extra speaker cable on it.


Now -- the benefits of leaving a configuration like mine (that is, a standard 5.1 setup) alone, leaving the surround back channels idle and empty, is that, theoretically, my receiver should be able to produce more dynamic headroom per channel because it's powering five channels instead of seven; Robbie or someone please correct me if I'm wrong here...

5.1:
ONKYO TX-SR605B - oppo BDP-83 - SONY KDS-50A2020 SXRD
polkaudio RTi12 - polkaudio CSi30 - SpeakerCraft Preinstalled In-Ceiling Surrounds - polkaudio PSW350
2-CHANNEL:
ONKYO TX-8555 - marantz CC-4001 - TASCAM CD-RW900SL - Numark CDMIX 1 - Infinity PRIMUS P363BK - audio-technica AT-LP120USB
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post #8914 of 8916 Unread 03-15-2015, 01:42 AM
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Originally Posted by IntelliVolume View Post
I think I'm with Robbie on this one, too; I also thought about "passive bi-amping" or "bi-wiring" (which is what you're describing, when you're using a receiver's unused channels to "feed" bi-ampable speakers) as I am running massive Polk RTi12's off an Onkyo 605 (the speakers and receiver are bi-amping capable)...but as it was explained to me, and as Robbie touched on above, there's no real sonic advantage to this (I have not personally physically tried it though) because you're still tapping off the receiver's common power supply; nothing's really "getting more powerful" if you catch my drift...


The idea behind this "bi-amping" (or wiring) concept -- and what the receiver manufacturers and some outlets such as Crutchfield attempt to hype to unbelievable levels -- was that by re-purposing the back surround channels of a 7.1 receiver if you're running a 5.1 setup, your FRONT main channels can get fed more power if they're bi-ampable. As I said, I never actually experimented with this but after it was explained to me that it basically "does nothing" (you need a whole different kind of complex setup if you really want to bi-wire/amp, wherein separate amplifiers are designated to drive the high and low portions of your loudspeakers...very complex, as I said) I didn't waste my time or extra speaker cable on it.


Now -- the benefits of leaving a configuration like mine (that is, a standard 5.1 setup) alone, leaving the surround back channels idle and empty, is that, theoretically, my receiver should be able to produce more dynamic headroom per channel because it's powering five channels instead of seven; Robbie or someone please correct me if I'm wrong here...
Yes, in receivers the less channels running the more power is available to those channels. And yes active bi-amping requires
active xovers, multiple amps, removal or bypassing the original internal xovers and then ensuring the whole system is calibrated properly. I run seperate power amps from the pre-outs, 150 true watts rms per channel with no power drop when all channels are driven.
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post #8915 of 8916 Unread 03-15-2015, 11:31 AM
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Thank you, Robbie.

5.1:
ONKYO TX-SR605B - oppo BDP-83 - SONY KDS-50A2020 SXRD
polkaudio RTi12 - polkaudio CSi30 - SpeakerCraft Preinstalled In-Ceiling Surrounds - polkaudio PSW350
2-CHANNEL:
ONKYO TX-8555 - marantz CC-4001 - TASCAM CD-RW900SL - Numark CDMIX 1 - Infinity PRIMUS P363BK - audio-technica AT-LP120USB
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post #8916 of 8916 Unread 03-24-2015, 09:10 PM
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I've put up with the dropouts for years...

...and I finally want to see if there's anything I can do about it.

I'm talking about the audio dropout that happens when the sound changes, say from a commercial coming back to the program.

There's always about a 2 second audio dropout as the receiver figures out what kind of sound it's handling. It happens constantly — I've never heard the first couple seconds of a movie I start playing.

(Ever cut 2 seconds into the 20th Century Fox music logo music at high volume? That alone has taken years off my life.)

Is there ANY configuration I can make to have sound transitions happen smoothly? Failing that, is there a way to set the Onkyo so it doesn't make any transitions at all?

Any help is appreciated...thanks!
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