How to add equalizer to receiver - AVS Forum | Home Theater Discussions And Reviews
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post #1 of 2 Old 11-26-2007, 04:46 PM - Thread Starter
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Probably a simple question. My cousin has an existing receiver hooked up to speakers and he was saying he wish he could adjust the treble and bass etc... when he is listening to music.

Is this what an amp does or an equalizer? What do I have to get to get it so that there are more options to adjust the sound other than preprogrammed settings the reciever comes with (i.e. theater, live etc...)
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post #2 of 2 Old 11-27-2007, 10:08 PM
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Does the receiver have tone controls for treble and bass? Many do, though sometimes the options are hidden in the electronic setup menus. Post the manufacturer and model number of the receiver and I bet someone will know, or will be able to download the manual to find out.

Adding an equalizer to an existing receiver is not possible within the bounds of practicality and good sense (in most cases -- again, post the model for more specific details). It is usually cheaper and works better just to replace the receiver.

I never use the "sound fields" (theater, live, etc.) in my receiver because I think they sound bad (unnatural and weird). I suspect most people on here avoid them like I do.

It is an "equalizer" or tone controls that can adjust treble and bass. An "amplifier" takes the tiny signal from your CD player (or other "source") and "amplifies" it to power the speakers.

Treating the room (rug on a wood floor, heavy curtains over windows, tapestries on walls, or using audio-specific panels and bass traps) can also help to tame "hot" treble and take some "one-note-boominess" out of the bass. If your friend has a specific problem with how his room sounds, describe the room and the sound problem and you might get some good basic treatment advice.

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