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post #391 of 408 Old 03-20-2012, 12:51 AM
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Try unplugging the AVR for 10 minutes and then do the micro reset again. If still no joy, then return/exchange the unit.

Also, for more questions on your 1912, post in the Denon XX12 Owner's thread linked in my sig.

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post #392 of 408 Old 09-20-2012, 11:24 AM - Thread Starter
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Yeah, it needs some editing, but I have a lot of other interests at the moment. Thanks. Maybe one day I will do some work on it smile.gif

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post #393 of 408 Old 02-07-2013, 10:53 AM
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Quote:
Originally Posted by toby10 View Post


In that scenario the video portion of an AVR is indeed redundant.

But where the video portion of an AVR can be very useful is numerous, if needed or desired.

For me the video portion is neither needed nor desired, and I can't find products where I only pay for what I need. Is there a category of equipment that can decode all the multichannel audio formats and let the user control the mix? A category that does not include video, and doesn't even include audio amplification?

I just need audio decoding, and mix control to line level pre-outs. Under 'AV Processors' I have found the Outlaw 975 and Emotiva UMC-200, both for around $600, but would like to spend much less if possible. I fear I'm stuck at this price point however...

Is it possible to find (and only pay for) just a simple Audio (A) processor? I'm looking at entry level AV recievers, but even the ones with pre-outs don't make it clear whether I can control which signal goes where. Some have only one RCA pre-out, and I'm not confident I can mute the subwoofer, use the center channel speaker output, and send the rest of the channels to my 2 channel stereo. Thanks for any help...
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post #394 of 408 Old 02-07-2013, 10:59 AM
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Quote:
Originally Posted by nuzzy View Post

Can someone explain AVR "brightness"? I had a sales rep tell me that my Yamaha RX-A2000 was a "bad match" for my Paradigm Studio speakers because Japanese AVR's tend to play "bright" and I should have gone with a US or UK AVR.

These days just about every AVR has a built-in multiband graphic equalizer. I guarantee you that no AVR will sound bright if you turn the top 3 bands all of the way down.

About those US and UK AVRs - all the ones I know about are assembled in China. Does anybody know about a mainstream AVR that isn't assembled on the Pacific RiM?
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post #395 of 408 Old 02-07-2013, 11:04 AM
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Quote:
Originally Posted by dcnblues View Post

Quote:
Originally Posted by toby10 View Post


In that scenario the video portion of an AVR is indeed redundant.

But where the video portion of an AVR can be very useful is numerous, if needed or desired.

For me the video portion is neither needed nor desired, and I can't find products where I only pay for what I need. Is there a category of equipment that can decode all the multichannel audio formats and let the user control the mix? A category that does not include video, and doesn't even include audio amplification?

I just need audio decoding, and mix control to line level pre-outs. Under 'AV Processors' I have found the Outlaw 975 and Emotiva UMC-200, both for around $600, but would like to spend much less if possible. I fear I'm stuck at this price point however...

Is it possible to find (and only pay for) just a simple Audio (A) processor? I'm looking at entry level AV recievers, but even the ones with pre-outs don't make it clear whether I can control which signal goes where. Some have only one RCA pre-out, and I'm not confident I can mute the subwoofer, use the center channel speaker output, and send the rest of the channels to my 2 channel stereo. Thanks for any help...

The two most economical ways to obtain what you want involve holding your nose.

(1) Method one - obtain an AVR with line level outputs - most of which are over $500 but still less costly than the stand-alone surround processors.

(2) Method two - obtain any decent AVR and use speaker level to line level converters to downconvert the speaker outputs into RCA jacks with compatible signals on them.

http://www.ebay.com/itm/Speaker-RCA-Line-Level-Converter-Adaptor-High-Low-/280659765462



I have no experience with the device above and only provide the information about it for the purpose of illustrating an example. Search google for speaker line level converter.
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post #396 of 408 Old 02-22-2013, 03:57 PM
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Originally Posted by sf49erjohn View Post

I have an Integra DPC-8.5 DVD universal player connected to an Arcam AVR300 receiver with a digital and 5 analog cables. I just purchased the HDAD of Alan Parson Eye in the Sky. On my receiver it is showing 24bit/96kHz sampling rate though I am playing the side which has 24/192. Is there anyway to play it at the higher sampling rate with this equipment setup? The DVD sounds great, I just want to see if I can hear it at the highest quality. Is this the correct forum for this question? Thanks in advance!
I do wonder if your 24/192 is really 24/96 times two.....

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post #397 of 408 Old 06-09-2013, 03:41 AM
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I have two older DVD players with 5.1 analog audio outputs which I'd like to use again. Problem is my AVR has only one set of 5.1 inputs.

Is there any 5.1 analog audio switch which can accept 2 or 3 multi-channel analog inputs?

Are there any analog-digital converters that can take 2 or 3 sets of 5.1 analog inputs and convert them to HDMI?

Or are there any receivers with 2 or 3 sets of 5.1 analog audio inputs?

Thanks!

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post #398 of 408 Old 06-09-2013, 09:24 AM
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Zektor has an excellent switch for just that purpose, although it cost about $250 when I was looking several years ago. So, I went with a simple mechanical switch from Philips instead for roughly $30. The switch has six paths described as component video, composite video, and stereo audio. But, it works fine for six audio channels. Some similar switches do not work because they have different resistances for the component video paths. But, the Philips switch does not.
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post #399 of 408 Old 06-09-2013, 12:10 PM
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Quote:
Originally Posted by BIslander View Post

Zektor has an excellent switch for just that purpose, although it cost about $250 when I was looking several years ago. So, I went with a simple mechanical switch from Philips instead for roughly $30. The switch has six paths described as component video, composite video, and stereo audio. But, it works fine for six audio channels. Some similar switches do not work because they have different resistances for the component video paths. But, the Philips switch does not.

Thanks! What's the name or model no of the Philips switch please?

The Zektor is not in production anymore and I can't seem to find it used on ebay or anywhere else.

Denon X4000: Yamaha AS500;TS500;CDS300: Pioneer BDP62FD;BDP23FD;DV58AV;DV610: Panasonic DMP-BDT500; Sony BDP-S790; Samsung PS60E6500
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post #400 of 408 Old 06-09-2013, 03:50 PM
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US2-PH61148

http://www.p4c.philips.com/cgi-bin/dcbint/cpindex.pl?slg=en&scy=us&ctn=US2-PH61148
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post #401 of 408 Old 06-10-2013, 05:35 AM
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Can I connect two AV receivers to one subwoofer with a Y-cable? Its a small room, I'd like to make two AVRs share one sub - only one AVR will be in use at any given time.

Denon X4000: Yamaha AS500;TS500;CDS300: Pioneer BDP62FD;BDP23FD;DV58AV;DV610: Panasonic DMP-BDT500; Sony BDP-S790; Samsung PS60E6500
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post #402 of 408 Old 06-10-2013, 06:10 AM
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Not sure. But I have to ask. Why do you have 2 AVRs in one small room and only use one of them at a time?

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post #403 of 408 Old 08-25-2013, 06:16 AM
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With hearing loss increasing to the point I can no longer understand whats being said on the TV I've been desperately searching for a way to hook up headphones to my AVR-1910 while still allowing my wife to listen at 'normal' volume levels. All of my components (Media PC, BluRay and TV) are connected via HDMI. I'm trying to hook up wireless headprones which only have RCA (red/white) inputs.

Based on the research I've done it looks like the only possible method the only possibility is to use a D->A adapter but there are unanswered questions on this.

- Is the optical output connector active when using the HDMI out to the TV?
- Is there a way to set the optical out to stereo (as required by all of the reasonably priced D/A adapters) while the HDMI puts out 5.1?

Other alternatives are welcome!

Thanks in advance for any and all help!
- Bob
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post #404 of 408 Old 08-25-2013, 06:49 AM
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Hi Bob ... welcome to AVSForum. This thread is for more generic AVR questions. You'll want to post model specific questions in their respective Owner's thread (if one exists) so I have reposted and answered your question in the Denon 1910 Owner's thread linked below.

http://www.avsforum.com/t/1152799/official-denon-avr-1910-790-owners-thread/9200_100#post_23666192

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post #405 of 408 Old 12-30-2013, 11:52 AM
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400+ responses to this great FAQ - my apologies for not reading every one if this has been covered, but how does one properly evaluate an AVR for relative power output to determine whether it's enough to push a set of speakers?

I see everything listed with varying output in watts/channel at various impedance + channels driven, eg, 125w/ch at 8ohms, 1ch driven, etc.

what does this actually mean for a set of speakers rated at say 50w-500w? we all know how much of a letdown it is when speakers are underpowered and sound tinny and empty.

I see old, beautiful and warm sounding stereo receivers with specifications of 25w/channel, and they blow away some of the new stuff with supposedly higher ratings.

I've seen a few units and manufacturers speccing out equipment in w/channel with all channels driven, etc, but this rare.

others state too look for a high current receiver. how is this spec determined?
I see that some of the better revered stuff is heavy, but then others stay that weight is just for tire kickers.


so my question is, how do I properly determine what's what, and what's appropriate for my speakers?
sorry if these are all newbie questions. I'm open to following up on any other resources provided to learn how to pick a good receiver or AVR.
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post #406 of 408 Old 02-28-2014, 09:26 AM
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Quote:
Originally Posted by MichaelJHuman View Post

General AVR FAQ

Introduction


This is an attempt to cover some basics of the modern AVR (Audio/Video receiver). This type of receiver is also known as a home theater receiver. The modern AVR should include at minimum –

* Video switching

* Analog and digital audio switching

* Five channels of amplification

* A Dolby Pro Logic II surround sound processor

* A Dolby Digital decoder

* A DTS decoder


Michael;
This is a very good sticky...though it's a little dated in post#1, which is what people see when they jump in.

Request:
Update it to 2014 modern AVR specs, thx.

Mike R,P.E. clickable DIY hot links:

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post #407 of 408 Old 03-04-2014, 11:56 PM - Thread Starter
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Hasn't changed too much has it? Dolby and DTS should probably say Dolby DD and TrueHD and DTS should probably be DTS and DTS Master Audio. Five channels is correct - some people would not run all seven speakers even if the receiver supported it. Video switching is still all you need for video - upscaling is pointless for most people in the modern area, unless they are in need of good DVD to HD scaling as their TVs scaling is junk.

Any suggestions for what you think it should say?

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post #408 of 408 Old 03-05-2014, 12:17 AM - Thread Starter
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Quote:
Originally Posted by msg464 View Post

400+ responses to this great FAQ - my apologies for not reading every one if this has been covered, but how does one properly evaluate an AVR for relative power output to determine whether it's enough to push a set of speakers?

I see everything listed with varying output in watts/channel at various impedance + channels driven, eg, 125w/ch at 8ohms, 1ch driven, etc.

what does this actually mean for a set of speakers rated at say 50w-500w? we all know how much of a letdown it is when speakers are underpowered and sound tinny and empty.

I see old, beautiful and warm sounding stereo receivers with specifications of 25w/channel, and they blow away some of the new stuff with supposedly higher ratings.

I've seen a few units and manufacturers speccing out equipment in w/channel with all channels driven, etc, but this rare.

others state too look for a high current receiver. how is this spec determined?
I see that some of the better revered stuff is heavy, but then others stay that weight is just for tire kickers.


so my question is, how do I properly determine what's what, and what's appropriate for my speakers?
sorry if these are all newbie questions. I'm open to following up on any other resources provided to learn how to pick a good receiver or AVR.

All valid questions. I will do my best to address them.

First off, speaker ratings seem to be of little importance. As you can probably have double the amp power vs the max power you should put into a speaker. Ideally you don't want to overdrive your amp. It's hard to damage speakers when your amp is putting out a clean signal, and your speakers aren't totally wrong for the job ( a one watt speaker driven with 100 watt amp is a bad idea, for example.)

Ratings are not cut in stone. The old FTC rule required quite a bit from a receiver, and therefore the ratings back then compared to modern ratings might be misleading. That's one theory. You can also speculate that some people might ask too much. A modern $500 receiver is chock full of complex functions and often has to amplify seven speakers. It gets a break in many cases, as low freq duties are handled by a powered sub. But maybe it's just not as amazing of a two channel amp compared to some 50 pound Pioneer from the old days. I prefer Yamaha's higher end stuff, which is $1000+. It sounds like a lot of money, but does seem to have more power. I also think people get a little crazy. -10 dB on the volume scale seems plenty loud to me. I have no interest in reference level ( 105+ dB) levels. If you really need such a thing, be prepared to spend some money.

Your point on weight is fair when talking about class AB amplifiers. There's no way around large transformers and capacitors needed for powerful class AB amps. A 20 pound receiver is going to have real limits. With Class D you can expect more power per weight though. Class D still doesn't seem to be the norm for AVRs though.

High current is to some extent marketing. I am no amp designer, but my understand is that you go about things a few ways. You could make an amp that did not put out a ton of power into 8 ohms due to a relatively low voltage power supply. The trade off should be more available current. So you can come close to doubling power into 4 ohm speakers. This used to be the Harmon Kardon approach. If you look at Yamaha schematics, you can see they use a high voltage supply, like 70V in their better models (or used to.) This should allow for some voltage drop and look better into a 8 ohm load. There might be some advantages to either approach, but I can't explain the details without reading my amp books again for clues. I will leave such decisions to the amplifier/receiver designers. That all being said, there were some rabbid Harmon Kardon fans years ago who swore HK sounded better than say Yamaha. I couldn't say from personal experience smile.gif

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