connecting power conditioner to power strip? - Page 2 - AVS Forum
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post #31 of 37 Old 05-08-2012, 01:41 PM
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It takes all the noise and frequencies out of the incoming power. Have you ever used a non shielded cable of any sort? VGA or rca or whatever? Lets take vga for example. If you use a non shielded vga cable, chances are that your image on your desktop monitor will be moving around or bouncing if there is any type of interference. In the line of work I am in, we have to use line filters in some applications. I retrofit and work on cnc machines.


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post #32 of 37 Old 05-08-2012, 01:46 PM
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Quote:
Originally Posted by SAM64 View Post

How?



It goes to zero 120 times per second, but that's by design, it's not dirty.



These components operate on DC, not AC.

All the components are AC power unless there is part of them that use dc power in which they have a bridge rectifier to convert the AC to DC. That means that it still uses the AC power coming in so I dont know where you were going with that?


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post #33 of 37 Old 05-08-2012, 04:50 PM
 
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Quote:


It takes all the noise and frequencies out of the incoming power.

The incoming 'power' is a 60Hz (or 50Hz) Sin wave, does it remove this frequency as well?

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I retrofit and work on cnc machines.

I'm an EE, I work in broadcasting, but internet credentials are meaningless.

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Have you ever used a non shielded cable of any sort? VGA or rca or whatever? Lets take vga for example. If you use a non shielded vga cable, chances are that your image on your desktop monitor will be moving around or bouncing if there is any type of interference

I'm familiar with shielded cable, I understand why coax is constructed the way it is. You don't quite understand the concept of shielding, and it doesn't actually relate to "power conditioners" in this case.

The "power conditioner" pictured in this thread has a bunch of inductors and capacitors in it, simple passive components forming notch, bandpass, high or low pass filters. Somewhat meaningless when you understand how a DC power supply 'converts' AC to DC.

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All the components are AC power unless there is part of them that use dc power in which they have a bridge rectifier to convert the AC to DC.

No, the input to the power supply is AC. I'm not going to explain linear or SMPS here, but the rest of the circuit operates on various DC voltages.

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That means that it still uses the AC power coming in so I dont know where you were going with that?

Agreed
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post #34 of 37 Old 05-08-2012, 05:46 PM
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Actually I do understand shielding and when ever I need to make an encoder cable, for example, I use the shield to filter noise. This relates to the power conditioner by filtering out excessive fq.

I also understand how a power supply converts AC to DC and I see your point on your argument there, but how do you know that all AV equipment has an AC to DC power supply and uses all DC power?


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post #35 of 37 Old 05-08-2012, 06:55 PM
 
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but how do you know that all AV equipment has an AC to DC power supply and uses all DC power?

Seriously? Experience, common sense.
Beside the motor in a turntable, what AV equipment that you know of, would use raw AC?

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I use the shield to filter noise.

It can be used for that, of course electromagnetic interference isn't stopped by a shield. Differential signalling is used in high interference areas and over long distances.
Telephone lines carry small signals for long distances next to high voltage lines, and they're not shielded.

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This relates to the power conditioner by filtering out excessive fq.

fq?
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post #36 of 37 Old 09-22-2014, 09:12 AM
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Personally, I have found some benefit to power conditioners. Over a power strip. I have a pyle pro power strip, the one with the fancy light show on it as a bonus. In any event, because I am sort of an insane collector and such, I have tons and tons of gear and it is all hooked up. The pyle power strip, was causing ground and other noise to come through my speakers. I had a bunch of fancy Studio analog and PPM meters hooked up to it.

I added a ebtech Xlr isolation unit to the sends on the meter collection and the problem was almost gone....... But when I replaced the Pyle strip with an ART PB 4 by 4 the problem was gone. Some how noise would get to the speakers with just a normal power strip.

I like the conditioners as they fit nicely, stacked with rack mount gear, and I especially like the ones with front panel convenience outlets as I use these a lot. They make it easy for me to change or rearrange gear from time to time, and for a few extra dollars they look so pretty with the rest of your gear. Lets face it... Everyone likes pretty, and NO one wants their high end gear which also is usually very pretty to to muddied up by some cheap power strip etc. Mind you I have not spend more than 150.00 on a power conditioner, as I just like the rack mount strip to look good with my gear and I am willing to pay for that.

For 100 dollars you can buy a whole house unit for extra protection from surges , however there are some issues power strips do in fact solve for people, but in my case you need to be an insane collector with tons of gear all hooked up at once to run into some of these issues. Most with a home theater can do without the conditioner if they do not need extra isolation and plugs. Lots with more gear hooked up like the remote turn on found on conditioners, a well placed feature. Rack lighting is also a nice feature, etc,

Power conditioners do give some UTILITY as they call it in Economics, but not as a stand alone protection device.

A Good amplifier requires a adequate power supply, It does not matter what the amplifier is capable of if the power supply will not provide the power required. Most amplifiers have under rated power supplies. It is up to you to make sure you get the ones that are
least under rated if at all.
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post #37 of 37 Old 09-22-2014, 09:03 PM
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Quote:
Originally Posted by arnyk View Post
Quote:Originally Posted by Swampfox

Is this what you are looking at?


IME those are nice to have in a rack, power conditioner or no.

Psst. Here's a secret about the very reasonably priced Tripp Lite version of those nobody else knows about but me [and now everyone reading this post]: you can cut them down to length!


Yup, say you buy one of the 72 inch long versions, say the
Tripp Lite Power Strip PS7224 Power distribution strip,
but it's 3 inches too long to fit the back of your rack. No need to compromise, return it, lose four outlet positions or more, and step down to their shorter version! Simply unplug it, unscrew the endplates, slide off the back to see that the screw holes those plates screwed into run the entire length, and cut off whatever you need to fit your needs with a hacksaw. Snip the internal wires and to be safe install some solid electric caps on their ends so they don't short, re-install the end plates, and bingo, you have yourself the custom length you need!

I assume no responsibility for anyone attemping this who has an accident or if it all goes horribly wrong. You need to know what you are doing and not be some electrical bozo who thinks masking tape should work well for insulating the trimmed ends. That's not good.

Last edited by m. zillch; 09-22-2014 at 09:34 PM.
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