Vinyl Records vs Cd's - Page 6 - AVS Forum
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Old 04-29-2013, 01:28 PM
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that IS what I said. Not exactly a frequency response inaccuracy in vinyl itself - - assuming everything is perfect, you could achieve perfectly flat response within the medium's reasonable pass band. But you couldn't do it for more than 10 minutes or so on an LP side with heavy bass without using the RIAA equalization scheme, which if perfectly implemented would not change the flat frequency response . . .

Vinyl mastering/cutting often also involves summing the bass to mono.
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Old 04-29-2013, 05:28 PM
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More sad than interesting, to read that the "director of recording arts and sciences at the Peabody Institute of Johns Hopkins University" apparently doesn't have a clue how lossy perceptual coding works, or how to compare the *sound* of an mp3 to its lossless source. Hint: 'hearing what was lost' via a null test isn't it.

But at least he does refer to that as a 'trick'.

I think from his comments he knows it is just a "trick" and there are much better equipment to do this. I was wondering if maybe this is something that is easliy accomplished in a recording control room? Maybe that is why?
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Old 04-29-2013, 06:12 PM
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Originally Posted by krabapple View Post

Vinyl mastering/cutting often also involves summing the bass to mono.

as does digital mastering at least sometimes, because why not maximize reproduction of the nondirectional frequencies. So, true but irrelevant in the context of saving space digitally (you'd need like 400 Hz sampling to encode up to 200 Hz,saving more than 16000 bits per second). IDK if it makes a time difference in vinyl mastering.
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Old 04-29-2013, 06:37 PM
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Originally Posted by JHAz View Post

as does digital mastering at least sometimes, because why not maximize reproduction of the nondirectional frequencies.


And how would it do that?

Summing to mono was done specifically to address properties of vinyl playback. Like, not wanting the needle to jump out of the groove during a high level bass passage. Not an issue with digital.
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Old 04-29-2013, 06:46 PM
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I think from his comments he knows it is just a "trick" and there are much better equipment to do this. I was wondering if maybe this is something that is easliy accomplished in a recording control room? Maybe that is why?

It's not a matter of 'equipment' at all. It's a matter of using the right test for the task at hand: testing the audibility of lossy vs source. And ABX comparison software is freely available to *you and me* -- you think he can't use it in a studio?

I wonder if maybe he was citing an inappropriate ''trick' (one that ignores the crucial importance of masking to lossy perceptual coding) as evidence that his subjective impression of MP3 (which he barely acknowledges can exist at low and high bitrates) is 'true'?
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Old 04-30-2013, 01:30 PM
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And how would it do that?

Summing to mono was done specifically to address properties of vinyl playback. Like, not wanting the needle to jump out of the groove during a high level bass passage. Not an issue with digital.

more drivers to push the same power should normally yield superior performance as you get to the individual drivers' limits. I think. Or at least I thought. Not exactly a big deal either way.

edit - I type like crap
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