So I've finally gotten the tape measure out and taken some pictures, PLEASE HELP: I'M CONSIDERING BOSE - AVS Forum
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post #1 of 7 Old 06-27-2012, 12:10 AM - Thread Starter
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Alright, so I'm coming to you guys (who seem to be experts) for some desperate help. I've tried just about everything and, upon my Best Buy employment, have finally been allowed a nice system (or so I think) with my 80% discount on Polk Audio equipment.

So first, my equipment:

399

I have a Pioneer VSX-520. I let it do its thing, and have really not calibrated anything with my speakers (I don't quite know what I'd do). The only thing I've done is crank the center channel up just a couple decibels to help with voices.

My front speakers are Polk Audio TSi-300's and my center channel is the CS10. I also have an older AR 15" sub that is in great shape, that is to the right of the TV stand (which has a Panasonic UT50 on it that I'm in love with)



Now, my room:

399
399

The distance from the center channel speaker to my navel is 7'. The listening area is about 12x12, and the whole room is 12x20. The speakers are about 7' apart (I read somewhere that they should be apart the same distance as the distance from the viewer).

The problem:

I am just not pleased with the sound. It seems like the highs and lows aren't playing well together. I don't think my subwoofer is doing well with the speakers, and altogether the sound is too tinny or too boomy. As I mentioned earlier, I work at Best Buy and demo the Cinemate II speakers all day long and they simply seem to fill the soundspace so much better than my system seems to do. I have grown very weary of the hassle it is to be able to barely hear voices, and I hate having to crank the volume to hear them, and when the special effects sound comes in, quickly lower the volume (I live in a duplex, so I can't crank the sound).

So, I'm willing to do anything within the realm of financially plausible possibilities, including speaker positioning, changing the layout, etc. Will you all forever shun me if I sell all of this stuff and get the 2.1 Bose system? Will I really be that disappointed? The way I see it, the proprietary calibration is what is so great. Is my receiver not good enough, should I get a nicer receiver? I also have some rear JBL's I'm planning on setting up, will this help? Am I crazy, or is a 5.1 signal coming through 3.1 speakers affecting my sound quality? Oh, and where can I put the JBL's?

Thanks in advance, I'm sure you guys will help me figure this problem out. I've had HTIB's, Sony floor-standing speakers, an older Bose system, and countless other solutions, and I'm yet to be satisfied.
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post #2 of 7 Old 06-27-2012, 01:57 AM
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Quote:
Originally Posted by bradleyedward 
The problem:
I am just not pleased with the sound. It seems like the highs and lows aren't playing well together. I don't think my subwoofer is doing well with the speakers, and altogether the sound is too tinny or too boomy. As I mentioned earlier,

Two words: room acoustics
Quote:
I work at Best Buy and demo the Cinemate II speakers all day long and they simply seem to fill the soundspace so much better than my system seems to do.

Seems like your home system needs some work, probably first some adjustment.

What you need to understand is that the honchos at Best Buy aren't idiots - their demo rooms are generally reasonably well designed as acoustical spaces.

If you are in a room with an audio systems, the most obvious thing you hear is the room, and the second most obvious thing you hear is how well the system is adjusted to match the room. Oh, and these first two things might come in the other order.

You got to stop just buying equipment and learn how to use it.
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post #3 of 7 Old 06-27-2012, 05:36 AM
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Definitely the room is the issue....... Put some area rugs down on that wood floor to make the room less live. It will help absorb some sound so you don't have sound waves bouncing all over the room causing reflections which will make things sound off and hard to hear even if the sound is loud. Put heavy thick curtains on the windows even if you pull them back, that will also help stop all the reflections.

Not sure but from the picture it looks like that coffee table is in the way of the center speaker. Move the coffee table or get rid of it also try flipping the center speaker upside down so its sitting on the angled surface. As that is what is for to angle the speaker up to get the tweeter aiming towards your ears. Placement of your front L&R are fine from the looks of the picture.

Try doing the things I suggested and then run the auto calibration on your receiver and maybe pick up a digital SPL meter from radio shack and use it to farther tune your speakers in.

Shawn
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post #4 of 7 Old 06-27-2012, 12:14 PM
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Quote:
Originally Posted by bradleyedward View Post

I am just not pleased with the sound. It seems like the highs and lows aren't playing well together.

Perhaps your biggest problem is sitting directly in front of a reflecting wall. That creates a series of peaks and deep nulls whose frequencies depend on the distance between your ears and that wall. The best setup would have the speakers in front of a short wall, firing the longer way down the room. Much more here:

How to set up a room
Acoustic Basics

--Ethan

RealTraps - The acoustic treatment experts
Ethan's Audio Expert book

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post #5 of 7 Old 06-27-2012, 03:01 PM
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Ethan,
I gave you a little grief in another thread about a link you provided.
This time I will give you a little appreciation.

I was just looking for a link with a concise explanation of why it's better to have the speakers on the short wall in a rectangular room, and your link "How to set up a room" does a nice job of explaining what I was looking for.

For every new thing I learn, I forget two things I used to know.
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post #6 of 7 Old 07-03-2012, 07:29 AM
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Your center channel should be as close to ear-level as possible.
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post #7 of 7 Old 07-03-2012, 08:33 AM
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Quote:
Originally Posted by WagBoss View Post

Your center channel should be as close to ear-level as possible.

But it can be lower or higher. He neds to go to http://www.avsforum.com/t/824554/setting-up-your-home-theater-101. This thread is full of info on setting up a home theater with tips and does and don'ts.
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