Questions about directing signals to alternate speakers - AVS Forum
Forum Jump: 
 
Thread Tools
post #1 of 4 Old 07-29-2012, 05:13 PM - Thread Starter
Newbie
 
machajew's Avatar
 
Join Date: Jul 2012
Posts: 2
Mentioned: 0 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 0 Post(s)
Liked: 10
Might be kind of basic questions, but I'm not too familiar with circuitry etc, so I need some help.

I'm using a Harman Kardon hk3490 stereo receiver for just audio purposes. I've always used it in a small apartment with the maximum two speaker set outputs (A and B) that the receiver supports.

Now that I have moved into a house, I have 3 speaker sets, the third set now being outside. I don't have any interest in running all three simultaneously, and whenever I listen outside, I have been disconnecting speaker set 2 and connecting speaker set 3 into the B output.

I've looked around and all the components I can find are boxes that split a single signal and can send it to 4 speakers and they seem geared toward simultaneous play. However, I've also seen people talking about the danger of these things in terms of impedence, overloading the receiver, breaking the speakers, terrible drop in quality etc.

I'd just like to get some kind of signal switch box so that I can have a single output (coming from my receiver's B output) going to a box, and then use the box to select whether this goes to my Speaker 2 or Speaker 3 so I don't have to rewire every time I want to listen outside.

I know I must not be the first who wants to toggle speaker sets like this - can anybody give me sort of the 'accepted' way for speaker switching, and let me know the dangers and the pitfalls I want to avoid when looking for a solution.

I came across this box http://www.monoprice.com/products/product.asp?c_id=109&cp_id=10903&cs_id=1090305&p_id=6857&seq=1&format=2 at monoprice. If I were to pick this up and use it with circuit protection would it do would I want without damaging my receiver? How about sound quality

Any and all advice to point me in the right direction would be greatly appreciated!
machajew is offline  
Sponsored Links
Advertisement
 
post #2 of 4 Old 07-30-2012, 05:22 AM
AVS Special Member
 
commsysman's Avatar
 
Join Date: Dec 2007
Location: Southern California
Posts: 5,254
Mentioned: 1 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 113 Post(s)
Liked: 250
A switch is pretty much a switch. The main precaution is to turn off the receiver for a few seconds before you switch speakers. Don't switch with the amplifiers on.
commsysman is offline  
post #3 of 4 Old 07-30-2012, 07:10 AM
AVS Addicted Member
 
arnyk's Avatar
 
Join Date: Oct 2002
Location: Grosse Pointe Woods, MI
Posts: 14,301
Mentioned: 1 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 690 Post(s)
Liked: 1144
Quote:
Originally Posted by machajew View Post

Might be kind of basic questions, but I'm not too familiar with circuitry etc, so I need some help.
I'm using a Harman Kardon hk3490 stereo receiver for just audio purposes. I've always used it in a small apartment with the maximum two speaker set outputs (A and B) that the receiver supports.
Now that I have moved into a house, I have 3 speaker sets, the third set now being outside. I don't have any interest in running all three simultaneously, and whenever I listen outside, I have been disconnecting speaker set 2 and connecting speaker set 3 into the B output.
I've looked around and all the components I can find are boxes that split a single signal and can send it to 4 speakers and they seem geared toward simultaneous play. However, I've also seen people talking about the danger of these things in terms of impedence, overloading the receiver, breaking the speakers, terrible drop in quality etc.
I'd just like to get some kind of signal switch box so that I can have a single output (coming from my receiver's B output) going to a box, and then use the box to select whether this goes to my Speaker 2 or Speaker 3 so I don't have to rewire every time I want to listen outside.
I know I must not be the first who wants to toggle speaker sets like this - can anybody give me sort of the 'accepted' way for speaker switching, and let me know the dangers and the pitfalls I want to avoid when looking for a solution.
I came across this box http://www.monoprice.com/products/product.asp?c_id=109&cp_id=10903&cs_id=1090305&p_id=6857&seq=1&format=2 at monoprice. If I were to pick this up and use it with circuit protection would it do would I want without damaging my receiver? How about sound quality
Any and all advice to point me in the right direction would be greatly appreciated!

Without getting this piece on my lab bench, I can only speculate on how it works.

Given its weight, it probably does not have autotransformers so sound quality might be less of an issue.

The only totally safe solution would be something that by design completely eliminated the possibility of hooking up more than 1 set of speakers to the amp(s). IOW a simple, straight forward 2P3T switch.

Actually finding one of those with appropriate current rating (say 15 amps) is up to you...
arnyk is offline  
post #4 of 4 Old 07-30-2012, 08:23 AM
Senior Member
 
has7738's Avatar
 
Join Date: May 2012
Location: North America
Posts: 297
Mentioned: 0 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 0 Post(s)
Liked: 24
I agree that a switch would work, and in most cases a DPDT would be fine (switching only the hot wires)' but there are some output circuits where the black and red terminals are both active, rather than the black being a common ground, which then necessitates either a 4PDT switch or separate L and R DPDT switches. This lets you switch both output connections rather than just the red/hot, but is normally not necessary. The above mentioned 15A switch rating is a little overly conservative, as that would assume a continuous power of over 900 watts. You could get by with much less. And switching speakers with your amp on isn't a problem, won't hurt a thing unless the amp design is really bad. if the amp can handle the complex impedance of a speaker, hot switching is not an issue.

This weird product would actually work fine. It's one quirk is wiring the speakers in series with both sets on, but that's not really a problem, especially if this is a background music application. By the way, the average power to a speaker used for background music in a home is a couple of watts. Even fairly loud background music won't be above 20.

http://www.mcmelectronics.com/product/50-6185
has7738 is offline  
Reply Audio theory, Setup and Chat

User Tag List

Thread Tools
Show Printable Version Show Printable Version
Email this Page Email this Page


Forum Jump: 

Posting Rules  
You may not post new threads
You may not post replies
You may not post attachments
You may not edit your posts

BB code is On
Smilies are On
[IMG] code is On
HTML code is Off
Trackbacks are Off
Pingbacks are Off
Refbacks are Off