Noob question: Could audio system damage the interior of a house? - AVS Forum
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post #1 of 10 Old 01-14-2013, 02:13 AM - Thread Starter
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I'm not having any equipment, infrastructural or hearing issues but I'm wondering if turning it up too loud could cause damage to the interior framework and infrastructure of the house like furnace, plumbing, circuits, insulation, wood and so forth.

Has anyone experienced any damage to a building infrastructure due to over loudness?

Also, in what order would the damage affect:

1.) my hearing
2.) the sound equipment
3.) the house infrastructure

My 5.1 audio system bedroom setup:
10'1" L x 9'11" D x 8' H. One corner opens up to a space (for the door to open/close) that measures 2'4" L x 2'11" D x 8' H.
AVR: Denon 1712
Fronts: Pioneer SP-BS41-LR
Center: Pioneer SP-C21
Rear: Pioneer SP-BS21-LR
Subwoofer: SVS PC12-NSD
TV: Samsung UN46EH6070...
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post #2 of 10 Old 01-14-2013, 05:33 AM
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Stealth3si View Post

I'm not having any equipment, infrastructural or hearing issues but I'm wondering if turning it up too loud could cause damage to the interior framework and infrastructure of the house like furnace, plumbing, circuits, insulation, wood and so forth.

Has anyone experienced any damage to a building infrastructure due to over loudness?

Also, in what order would the damage affect:

1.) my hearing
2.) the sound equipment
3.) the house infrastructure

(1) Your hearing
(2) Someone else's hearing
(3) Loudspeakers

Houses have to withstand such prolonged and severe environmental and thermal stresses that the audio, providing that humans have to withstand it without being hurt, is trivial.
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post #3 of 10 Old 01-14-2013, 01:22 PM - Thread Starter
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Quote:
Originally Posted by arnyk View Post

Houses have to withstand such prolonged and severe environmental and thermal stresses that the audio, providing that humans have to withstand it without being hurt, is trivial.
Even a house built in the early 1990s?

My 5.1 audio system bedroom setup:
10'1" L x 9'11" D x 8' H. One corner opens up to a space (for the door to open/close) that measures 2'4" L x 2'11" D x 8' H.
AVR: Denon 1712
Fronts: Pioneer SP-BS41-LR
Center: Pioneer SP-C21
Rear: Pioneer SP-BS21-LR
Subwoofer: SVS PC12-NSD
TV: Samsung UN46EH6070...
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post #4 of 10 Old 01-14-2013, 01:45 PM
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Even in a house built in the early 1890s...

You cannot stay in a room loud enough to do any damage to the structure.
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post #5 of 10 Old 01-14-2013, 02:45 PM
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I don't know about that.

Put enough subwoofers in there to generate 100db at 10hz and I can easily see you cracking old dried out plaster walls.

Granted 'if the house is well built', you will do no damage, but prolonged exposure to high output at very low frequencies could easily expose some previously hidden issues in my opinion.
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post #6 of 10 Old 01-14-2013, 03:07 PM
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post #7 of 10 Old 01-14-2013, 03:21 PM
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Quote:

Ignores mechanical resonance.
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post #8 of 10 Old 01-14-2013, 03:34 PM
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Quote:
Originally Posted by xianthax View Post

Ignores mechanical resonance.
It does in general, but it is mentioned:

"163 (P)GLASSBREAKING LEVEL, MINIMUM, IT IS VERY HARD TO BREAK GLASS WINDOWS.
MANY STORIES COME FROM BREAKING GLASS BUT IT IS HIGHLY VARIABLE: IT IS
EASIER TO BREAK IF THE WINDOW ALREADY HAS A CRACK, IS VERY LARGE OR
OLD AND BRITTLE AND NOT CAR SAFETY GLASS WHICH CAN FLEX MASSIVELY
BEFORE BREAKING. AN OPERA SINGER AT 110 DB MAY BREAK A WINEGLASS BUT IT IS AN
EXAMPLE OF FREQUENCY RESONANCE, AND NOT HIGH SOUND DB LEVEL -REF.1.1987"
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post #9 of 10 Old 01-14-2013, 03:53 PM
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My point is that you don't need extreme SPL levels to cause damage in some instances. Again - if its a soundly built structure, you aren't doing to cause massive structural damage.

You certainly (and I've sat and watched) small problems become big problems due to audio. The three that come to mind are a minor nick in a windshield of my car crack all the way across in response to the sound system being off/on, you could watch it grow. Second a crack in a drywall corner seam do the same thing all 10ft down the seam (building settling being the root culprit). Third being an HVAC duct that had a structural resonance such that the attachements rattled loose and it 'fell'.

So I agree that your sound system isn't doing to huff, puff and blow your house down. But, you can cause damage by making minor issue become major ones it a short period of time.
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post #10 of 10 Old 01-14-2013, 04:02 PM
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Quote:
Originally Posted by xianthax View Post

My point is that you don't need extreme SPL levels to cause damage in some instances. Again - if its a soundly built structure, you aren't doing to cause massive structural damage.

You certainly (and I've sat and watched) small problems become big problems due to audio. The three that come to mind are a minor nick in a windshield of my car crack all the way across in response to the sound system being off/on, you could watch it grow. Second a crack in a drywall corner seam do the same thing all 10ft down the seam (building settling being the root culprit). Third being an HVAC duct that had a structural resonance such that the attachements rattled loose and it 'fell'.

So I agree that your sound system isn't doing to huff, puff and blow your house down. But, you can cause damage by making minor issue become major ones it a short period of time.
These are good things to find out about and fix. The damage (or in third case poor construction) was already there.

The window crack would have propagated anyway as a result of other normal forces from driving and temp changes. Only way to stop a window crack is to seal the nick if it hasn't started to propagate yet.
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