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Old 01-15-2013, 08:28 AM - Thread Starter
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Ok so right now I am living in an apartment, and probably will be for the next year or two. I was just wondering if there is any way to lesson the amount of sound and bass that exits out of my apartment and into my neighbors apartments. My neighbors are always complaining that the movies are too loud and that the bass is rattling their walls.

Are there any types of acoustical materials or methods for reducing sound levels in a situation like mine? Of course I can't go ripping the sheetrock off the walls to do this, but my landlord is ok with nailing/stappeling stuff to the walls, or putting up any type of sound treatment.

Any suggestions?
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Old 01-15-2013, 08:53 AM
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Treble and midrange sounds you can definitely stop with room treatment. But bass will be a problem. Put your sub on an isolation platform to stop any unwanted mechanical vibration but it won't keep the bass from transferring to their apt. Talk to your neighbors and find a time of day or certain days where they are "ok" with you watching movies and having it louder. Most times its better to be upfront with them and try to compromise.

Also INVITE them over for a movie sometime, then when they see and hear what you experience they will understand a bit more and be more educated on the situation.

Good Luck

Shawn
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Old 01-16-2013, 04:42 AM - Thread Starter
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Thanks for the advise, Flickhtguru! Unfortunately my neighbors work the same hours that I do. So I am unable to plan my movie watching around that.

I am, however, interested in the best ways to prevent the mid and high frequencies from bleeding through the walls into their units. What would you suggest for that, as far as treatments go? Should I cover the entire wall that I share with my neighbors? If so, what would be a good type of material to use? How much should be used and where should it be placed?

Thanks!
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Old 01-16-2013, 06:17 AM
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I'll let the room treatment experts here answer what exactly you should do and use.

A few things that help are a thick plush carpeted floor with thick padding, thick curtains, drapes, and/or blinds at all windows. Have soft plush furniture and don't keep your walls bare, put pictures and different things on them.

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Old 01-16-2013, 12:24 PM
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really soundproofing is entirely different from room treatment. I used to have a few pretty dicent links for soundproofing home recording studios, but they're on a computer I haven't plugged in for a few years (along with a Yamaha XG Factory that once was a hot dog in DAWs).

Bass is the least controllable and arguably the most annoying leakage, unfortunately . . . all you need are double walls floors and ceilings built on separate, offset sets of studs, maybe a limp barrier for the lows, and to fill every crack no matter where and no matter haw small to prevent sound from excaping. No amount of absorption in the room will prevent the direct sound from the speakers from sliding right through any available opening . . . no matter how inconsequential it may seem . .
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Old 01-16-2013, 04:20 PM
 
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Martycool007 View Post

Ok so right now I am living in an apartment, and probably will be for the next year or two. I was just wondering if there is any way to lesson the amount of sound and bass that exits out of my apartment and into my neighbors apartments. My neighbors are always complaining that the movies are too loud and that the bass is rattling their walls.

Are there any types of acoustical materials or methods for reducing sound levels in a situation like mine? Of course I can't go ripping the sheetrock off the walls to do this, but my landlord is ok with nailing/stappeling stuff to the walls, or putting up any type of sound treatment.

Sound isolation is most easily improved by eliminating air paths between the spaces to be isolated. Cracks under doors and around windows, heating ducts, etc. Once that avenue has been pretty well exploited, further isolation is obtained by use of isolated walls, floors, and ceilings. For example if the wall separating two rooms has separate studs for each wall sufrace, then sound isolation between the rooms is increased. Floating floors can be very effective. Floating ceilings are also possible. If you can do it, build a room within a room.
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