How much can a breaker withstand? - Page 2 - AVS Forum
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post #31 of 37 Old 09-28-2013, 12:13 AM
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Now that I've seen the picture I stand by my description, "funky", but knob and tube it ain't. I think that's a standard I'm not familiar with.

I've heard it said many times, "when installed correctly knob and tube is a good system". I think that gets repeated without much thought. I stand by my statement, in this day and age, it's woefully inadequate.

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post #32 of 37 Old 09-28-2013, 05:49 AM
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Originally Posted by Patrick Collins View Post

Now that I've seen the picture I stand by my description, "funky", but knob and tube it ain't. I think that's a standard I'm not familiar with.

I wish that I wasn't familiar with it!
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I've heard it said many times, "when installed correctly knob and tube is a good system". I think that gets repeated without much thought. I stand by my statement, in this day and age, it's woefully inadequate.

I agree. I've done enough rehab of houses built in the 1940s and 1950s to know that Romex generally stands the test of time.

Knob and tube is a system with about 1 level of safety - if you make no mistakes it does not explode right away. Romex is a system that has many levels of safety - you can make many dumb mistakes (I've seen a lot of of them) and it is still safe for most practical purposes.

Of course I recommend that everybody who installs wiring familiarize themselves with all of the guidelines and follow them to the best of their ability.
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post #33 of 37 Old 09-28-2013, 03:11 PM
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My background isn't residential but in old houses with knob and tube you could have the scenario where an appliance has it's hot wire touching the case and not tripping the breaker. Then you touch the case and a faucet. Ouch, or worse.

Looks like we'll have to send Bubba over to TTB's house. Or put this to bed.

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post #34 of 37 Old 09-28-2013, 04:04 PM
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Be careful casually substituting impedance for resistance in that equation. Impedance can include capacitive and inductive components and greatly impact the power factor with leading or lagging current. biggrin.gif

I am well aware of that, as are several others on this thread, but the average audiophile does not have an EE or physics degree.

"After silence, that which best expresses the inexpressible, is music" - Aldous Huxley
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post #35 of 37 Old 09-28-2013, 06:49 PM
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Safety is #1.

Make sure if you do your own electrical you get help from a friend who is an Electrician. There are plenty of intelligent people that can do a basic wiring job with the correct tools and a little teaching of the correct way to do the job. Just because it "works" doesn't mean it is right.

The main point of installing wiring up to code (NEC) is that it is safe and will not be a fire hazard, I can't stress this enough.

Regardless if you as the home owner do your own work, or a professional does, get it inspected. Not all Electricians or Inspectors are created equal. If you do the work correctly or a professional who knows what they are doing does you are in good hands. I know most people don't like paying for a permit or dealing with the Inspector, but you should anyway. Most Inspectors are a lot more willing to work with people now days with all the department cut backs, etc. They are their to help you make sure it is installed correctly, not to tell you how to install it. They are on your side to make the un-bias judgement if the work done is safe and correct, if done by professional or home owner.

If you install as little as 1' of electrical wiring it should be inspected. I know this sounds dumb, but think about it. Electrical terminations are critical, loose one are a fire hazard. All it take is 1' of undersized wire in the middle of a circuit wire run to cause a fire when overloaded.
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post #36 of 37 Old 09-30-2013, 05:27 AM
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Most of the time a 15 amp duplex ( what you normally see in your house) receptacle is installed on a 20 amp circuit, which is code compliant. Each spot to plug in is considered a receptacle, so there is technically (2) 15 amp receptacles on the circuit. What I'm getting at is that the one of the two you plug into is only rated for 15 amps, another bottle neck. Upgrade it to a 20 amp unit.Up sizing wire in your average home for voltage drop isn't really needed, but if you are looking for every edge then go for it. The cost to amount of return is minimal. If you have the extra time and money to do it, go for it. Otherwise save if for something else.

Not clear on what you're getting at here.

If your cord-connected devices don't have 20A plugs there is no reason to replace 15A receptacles with 20A receptacles.

Just because there is a knob doesn't mean you should turn it.
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post #37 of 37 Old 09-30-2013, 05:26 PM
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Originally Posted by Soundtastic View Post

......Each spot to plug in is considered a receptacle, so there is technically (2) 15 amp receptacles on the circuit. What I'm getting at is that the one of the two you plug into is only rated for 15 amps, another bottle neck. Upgrade it to a 20 amp unit.

Yes, per code half a 15a duplex is only rated for 15a on paper. But the receptacle must still be able to loop through 20a and therefore the metal in the contacts is also good for 20amps. There's not really a bottleneck there at all except that you couldn't insert a dedicated 20a plug.

You sure as hell aren't going to hear an audible difference between a 15a and 20a receptacle alone. You may hear a difference between a 15a, 14awg and 20a, 12awg circuit with a big amp and long in-wall run.

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