PCOCC copper - better than regular copper? - AVS Forum
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post #1 of 11 Old 11-01-2013, 07:22 AM - Thread Starter
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Any views?
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post #2 of 11 Old 11-01-2013, 07:24 AM
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Better in what way? I doubt it conducts electricity meaningfully better, whatever it is.
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post #3 of 11 Old 11-01-2013, 07:38 AM - Thread Starter
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Interconnect between processor and amp
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post #4 of 11 Old 11-01-2013, 07:46 AM
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Quote:
Originally Posted by gchuva View Post

Any views?

PCOCC stands for pure copper Ohno continuous cast wire.

http://www.outlawaudio.com/support/faq_cables.html

"
A. The OCC process for refining copper was developed and patented by Professor Ohno of the Chiba Institute of Technology in Japan and is licensed to our manufacturer for use in the production of wire and cable products for the audio/video industry. In conventional processing, hot molten copper is poured into a cooled mold for extrusion, resulting in multiple, fractionated crystal structure. While the copper may be "pure" in the sense of measuring gas impurities in the copper in comparison to standard copper refining techniques, Oxygen Free Copper (OFC) has undesirable effects that lead many to use more expensive materials such as silver for their conductive strands. As developed for A/V cable use, the OCC process utilizes a heated mold for casting and extruding, with cooling taking place in a separate process. The result is a larger crystal size and increased purity that approaches the 6N, 99.9998%! Looking at it another way, traditional copper has oxygen impurities of 200 to 500 parts per million (PPM), while traditional OFC copper reduces that to less than 10 PPM. With the OCC process, the figure is cut in half to less than 5 PPM of oxygen, and less than 0.25 PPM of hydrogen (compared to 0.5 PPM for OFC). With these results, the OCC process creates "ultra-pure" copper, and thus the acronym for the copper material is more properly known as "UP-OCC", for Ultra-Pure, Ohno Continuous Casting. Summarizing the benefits of the UP-OCC material used in our PCA cables you get the following:
• A true unidirectional copper crystal that is as free from impurities as possible to prevent corrosion
• Flexibility and fatigue resistance without impairing conductive characteristics
• Low electrical resistance
• Rapid signal transmission
"

Just about any person who is well informed about audio cables or wire will tell you that the above is the sheerest BS but perhaps not as bluntly. It is so easy to refute on a point by point basis that I won't bother to do unless asked to. It i IMO is a blight on the company publishing it. Their marketing department appears to be to have been taken over by space aliens! ;-)

The previous upchucking of this kind of balderdash about crystals in copper wire that I am aware of was called "Single Crystal OFHC wire" and dates back to the 1980s if memory serves. It was BS then and it is BS now.

Ask me again about this subject and I will tell you what I really believe! ;-)
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post #5 of 11 Old 11-01-2013, 09:02 AM
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Quote:
Originally Posted by gchuva View Post

Interconnect between processor and amp

Interconnects are interconnects. The methodology for refining the copper has nothing to do with anything audio.
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post #6 of 11 Old 11-01-2013, 12:53 PM
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ever wonder why the magic wire enthusiasts never tackle the alloy construction of the copper traces on the various PCBs, the lead /tin alloys used on solder and the plating of the switch contacts?
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post #7 of 11 Old 11-01-2013, 05:50 PM
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Gizmologist View Post

ever wonder why the magic wire enthusiasts never tackle the alloy construction of the copper traces on the various PCBs, the lead /tin alloys used on solder and the plating of the switch contacts?

Yes, and you see these huge 8awg speaker cables going to the binding posts on the back of the amp and on the inside of the amp there are 14awg wires from the binding posts to the final stage output terminal (or even worse soldered to even thinner copper traces on the amplifier output board).

The only reason for buying "better" interconnects is the quality of construction. I'm not going to hook up a preamp to an amplifier with a combined cost of $4k with a $5 Radio Shack interconnect but instead will use an interconnect that maybe costs $40 - $100 and has a quality construction that I like - not because it sounds better but because I like them and they match the quality of the other components in my system. But spending $300 - $500 or more on interconnects is insane.

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post #8 of 11 Old 11-01-2013, 06:20 PM
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So copper is purchased similar to gold, in blocks. And then melted into whatever form is required. All manufacturers basically do this the same, and... well...
This says it all really.:




999 Copper, i.e. 99.9% pure copper.

So if you wasted money paying extra for the cable that said 99.9% OFC compared to the one that just said "Copper" then you got trolled. Simple.
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post #9 of 11 Old 11-01-2013, 06:22 PM
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Having said that, I agree with previous poster - I didnt skimp on cable/interconnects so that it would match the quality of the system.
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post #10 of 11 Old 11-01-2013, 06:23 PM
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Having said that, I agree with previous poster - I didnt skimp on cable/interconnects so that it would match the quality of the system.
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post #11 of 11 Old 11-01-2013, 06:39 PM
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FYI, most of the TSR patch cables used in recording studio run around 10-12.00 per foot including molded TSR plugs. They get a LOT of handling and insertion cycles. Most home systems regardless of expense do not have repeated handling cycles.
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