Whine from speakers - AVS Forum
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post #1 of 7 Old 11-23-2013, 07:56 AM - Thread Starter
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Hi,

There is a whine that my setup produces from my pc connection.

The pc has a xonar dg sound card running the unified drivers. It is connected to a Yamaha v365 receiver via 3 phono cables.

The sound is not there when I am watching tv, only on the pc connection. The sound stops when I mute the receiver.

There are lots of posts about whine from speakers, and the solutions suggested does not cure mine. It is definitely not coil whine, not directly anyway.

I have no wifi card in pc.

Any help or suggestions to cure this greatly appreciated!

Thanks
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post #2 of 7 Old 11-23-2013, 12:10 PM
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I assume this is a PC running Windows? Call up the sound card's mixer app, and turn down the volume for all sources you're not using. Some mixer apps hide lesser used controls, so look closely to be sure all available controls are showing, and all are turned down or muted except for Wave Output (or whatever it may be called).

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post #3 of 7 Old 11-23-2013, 02:35 PM
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Sounds like the sound card is picking up noise from the PC. Besides doing what Ethan suggested, moving the sound card to a different slot , grounding unused inputs, rearranging cards if there are more than one, moving cables, etc. might make a difference
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post #4 of 7 Old 11-23-2013, 03:18 PM
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Generally speaking, internal sound cards inside computers are highly susceptible to the electrical noise generated by the electrical circuits. Specifically, any sound circuits that aren't made specifically to have the electromagnetic compatibility for good analog audio output can be problematic. What's worse, different software can inadvertently create phantom noises!

The problem can be either or both hardware and software. To handle the hardware aspect, the best thing to do is to do the digital to analog conversion outside of the computer. Many computers have S/PDIF jacks that will work with most DACs, and stand-alone DACs that plug into the computer's USB port are now plentiful and affordable. If moving your sound card around (I wouldn't recommend shorting the connectors myself) isn't producing any results, buying a USB DAC is the easiest and least expensive option.

If you fix the hardware and the problem persists, then it's likely to be a software problem. Unfortunately the sheer amount of possible software makes fixing that problem far more complicated.

One thing that I learned to do was to take an older PC and repurpose it for audio-only use. Instead of Windows, I use a specialized Linux distribution made especially for audio use. If you have an old PC handy, you might want to try a similar setup.
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post #5 of 7 Old 11-26-2013, 02:14 PM - Thread Starter
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Speed Daemon View Post

Generally speaking, internal sound cards inside computers are highly susceptible to the electrical noise generated by the electrical circuits. Specifically, any sound circuits that aren't made specifically to have the electromagnetic compatibility for good analog audio output can be problematic. What's worse, different software can inadvertently create phantom noises!

The problem can be either or both hardware and software. To handle the hardware aspect, the best thing to do is to do the digital to analog conversion outside of the computer. Many computers have S/PDIF jacks that will work with most DACs, and stand-alone DACs that plug into the computer's USB port are now plentiful and affordable. If moving your sound card around (I wouldn't recommend shorting the connectors myself) isn't producing any results, buying a USB DAC is the easiest and least expensive option.

If you fix the hardware and the problem persists, then it's likely to be a software problem. Unfortunately the sheer amount of possible software makes fixing that problem far more complicated.

One thing that I learned to do was to take an older PC and repurpose it for audio-only use. Instead of Windows, I use a specialized Linux distribution made especially for audio use. If you have an old PC handy, you might want to try a similar setup.

Thanks for all the help. This sounded like it was going to be a never ending quest for something I might never find!

 

I took this as an opportunity to go over to optical and spend the Sunday setting it up and getting the right sound.

 

So far so good and no whine!

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post #6 of 7 Old 11-27-2013, 05:00 AM
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That's great news! I'm glad it worked, and am happy to have been of service.

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post #7 of 7 Old 11-27-2013, 03:13 PM
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Quote:
Originally Posted by skaboy607 View Post

I took this as an opportunity to go over to optical...So far so good and no whine!
Yep, bypass the analog circuitry and you will eliminate the whine. Much easier than fixing the problem in the analog area.
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