How to measure for proper LFE? - AVS Forum
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post #1 of 3 Old 04-05-2014, 01:07 PM - Thread Starter
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This one needs some background, I think, but I'll keep it brief.

My old receiver was dying, but in such a way that I didn't realize it right away. Channels were getting quiet and eventually dropped out entirely. I was probably increasing volume across the board to compensate, thus resulting in a bit too much bass/LFE from movies and such. I know this was the case with stereo content, because those were the channels impacted the most by the receiver's failure.. when listening to stereo content, I actually had to turn the subwoofer's volume down a fair bit.

So, I've since replaced it with one of the new Yamahas (the old one was a Sony, and I'm using its speakers), and my surround life is good again. Loudness is not a problem, and clarity is far better than it ever was, especially now I'm finally using lossless audio over HDMI.

But, since putting in the new hardware and getting it set up, I've noticed the bass isn't nearly as high as it used to be (which was expected, as noted above), but I think it may be lower than it should be. I'm not using any processing in the receiver, it has a "straight" mode, which it actually recommends for Blu-ray. The speakers have been calibrated using the built-in tool with the microphone (which my old Sony didn't have, it predates such fancy technology). It seems to have worked, since my listening position is slightly off-center and it's calibrated the surrounds perfectly, to my ears. It did tell me to make sure the subwoofer was at half volume for the calibration, which is where I usually had it anyway, and it made no mention of turning it up afterwards (am I supposed to?).

Is there any test or demo to tell whether it's equalized correctly? I consider myself a purist when it comes to director's intent, so I don't want to crank up the bass in the equalizer just so it sounds "good"... I want it to sound correct.

Thoughts? Thanks in advance.

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post #2 of 3 Old 04-05-2014, 04:35 PM
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Jedi2016 View Post

This one needs some background, I think, but I'll keep it brief.

My old receiver was dying, but in such a way that I didn't realize it right away. Channels were getting quiet and eventually dropped out entirely. I was probably increasing volume across the board to compensate, thus resulting in a bit too much bass/LFE from movies and such. I know this was the case with stereo content, because those were the channels impacted the most by the receiver's failure.. when listening to stereo content, I actually had to turn the subwoofer's volume down a fair bit.

So, I've since replaced it with one of the new Yamahas (the old one was a Sony, and I'm using its speakers), and my surround life is good again. Loudness is not a problem, and clarity is far better than it ever was, especially now I'm finally using lossless audio over HDMI.

But, since putting in the new hardware and getting it set up, I've noticed the bass isn't nearly as high as it used to be (which was expected, as noted above), but I think it may be lower than it should be. I'm not using any processing in the receiver, it has a "straight" mode, which it actually recommends for Blu-ray. The speakers have been calibrated using the built-in tool with the microphone (which my old Sony didn't have, it predates such fancy technology). It seems to have worked, since my listening position is slightly off-center and it's calibrated the surrounds perfectly, to my ears. It did tell me to make sure the subwoofer was at half volume for the calibration, which is where I usually had it anyway, and it made no mention of turning it up afterwards (am I supposed to?).

Is there any test or demo to tell whether it's equalized correctly? I consider myself a purist when it comes to director's intent, so I don't want to crank up the bass in the equalizer just so it sounds "good"... I want it to sound correct.

Thoughts? Thanks in advance.

check out the fletcher munson curves. If you listen at lower than ouch! volume levels, bass is probably perceived as low because that's how our ears work. If your receiver doesn't have Dolby Volume or something, just do what many do and increase the sub level until it seems about right for your listening habits. Note, though, that because most music (non-classical and generally non-jazz) is mastered way differently than movies, the added bass MIGHT seem like too much to you in music, Either find a happy medium or pick whatever suits you (or adjust all the time between movies and music). If I had to choose, I'd make it right for music and live with light bass for movies, but that's me . . . .
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post #3 of 3 Old 04-07-2014, 08:40 PM - Thread Starter
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It seems to be just the ways that different movies are mixed. Possibly a result of bumping up to lossless audio. In any event, I just watched The Dark Knight and the walls were shaking so... never mind. smile.gif lol That seems to be first really LFE-heavy film that I've watched since I got the new hardware.

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