Turntable/Record Issues (sorry if this is wrong forum) - AVS Forum
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post #1 of 28 Old 04-10-2014, 01:26 AM - Thread Starter
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Hi Guys, sorry if this is the wrong forum - feel free to move.

 

I have a late 70s/early 80s pioneer drive-based turntable (acquired very recently). It plays all my records perfectly... apart from one.

 

This particular LP has the head bouncing far more than other records, meaning it is impossible to play (I know the head moves up and down generally, but this is excessive). I know this isn't a turntable issue - but is there anything I can do with the record to fix this? I am assuming it has warped slightly, as it doesn't appear to sit completely flat on the turntable.

 

I never used to have this issue with this record, but this is the first time I have tried it on this turntable. I have tried adjusting the weight on the turntable but this doesn't make any difference.

 

Any advice is greatly appreciated as I have only played the record a few times and is one of my favourites, costing a pretty penny on discogs a couple of years ago...

 

All the best

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post #2 of 28 Old 04-10-2014, 02:17 AM
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Usually turntable stuff goes in the CD player/dedicated transports area from what I've seen. Does sound like a warped record....how did you store it since last used? The platter of the turntable is flat, yes? You may be able to flatten the vinyl but it is possible to damage in the process. You might try vinylengine.com, lots more tt stuff there. Basically what I've seen is pressing the disc between two big heavy blocks of stone/glass/etc sometimes with the application of heat. Might be easier to replace it. Good luck.

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post #3 of 28 Old 04-12-2014, 01:14 AM - Thread Starter
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Usually turntable stuff goes in the CD player/dedicated transports area from what I've seen. Does sound like a warped record....how did you store it since last used? The platter of the turntable is flat, yes? You may be able to flatten the vinyl but it is possible to damage in the process. You might try vinylengine.com, lots more tt stuff there. Basically what I've seen is pressing the disc between two big heavy blocks of stone/glass/etc sometimes with the application of heat. Might be easier to replace it. Good luck.


Hi, it's been in a box while I moved with the other records (which all seem OK). It is only a small part on the edge by looking at it. If I pace the needle further in and play it seems OK. So I need to just straight out a tiny bit?

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post #4 of 28 Old 04-12-2014, 10:18 AM
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The first thing to try is to make sure your turntable is set up properly, with the right tracking force, etc. But it is possible that the record is just too warped for your turntable to play it, in which case the best solution is to get another record.

You can try to flatten the record you have, but you may damage it in the process. You could try putting it on a flat table with a heavy flat thing on top of it, with just enough weight to it to flatten the record, and leave it that way for a few days. It might help, it might not, and it might damage the record.

God willing, we will prevail in peace and freedom from fear and in true health through the purity and essence of our natural fluids. God bless you all.
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post #5 of 28 Old 04-12-2014, 10:30 AM - Thread Starter
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Hi, turntable is playing every other record fine, just this one. It would cost a lot of money to replace. I guess I'll try some weight focusing on the bit that's warped. I'll try and protect the record with some paper or something.
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post #6 of 28 Old 04-12-2014, 10:38 AM
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The suggestion was to replace the record, not the record player.

God willing, we will prevail in peace and freedom from fear and in true health through the purity and essence of our natural fluids. God bless you all.
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post #7 of 28 Old 04-12-2014, 11:17 AM - Thread Starter
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Oh yeah I know. It's the record that'll be costly!
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post #8 of 28 Old 04-14-2014, 02:19 AM
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If I pace the needle further in and play it seems OK. So I need to just straight out a tiny bit?

 

This sounds like an upright standing record getting warped by the sun (or another heat source), so the area where it is in contact with the floor gets warped. Try and inspect the record edge closely, you can probably see this - it usually gets a slight "S"-shaped edge around the affected area, seen from the side of the record (e.g. when it should look flat/plane). And this dissolves when you get nearer the center of the record.

I don't thing you can get this flat again, not by pressing or heating it. I have tried a few methods earlier involving flat glass pieces and ironing, without any difference.

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post #9 of 28 Old 04-14-2014, 10:20 AM
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Oh yeah I know. It's the record that'll be costly!

Out of curiosity, what's the record?

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post #10 of 28 Old 04-15-2014, 01:27 AM - Thread Starter
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This sounds like an upright standing record getting warped by the sun (or another heat source), so the area where it is in contact with the floor gets warped. Try and inspect the record edge closely, you can probably see this - it usually gets a slight "S"-shaped edge around the affected area, seen from the side of the record (e.g. when it should look flat/plane). And this dissolves when you get nearer the center of the record.

I don't thing you can get this flat again, not by pressing or heating it. I have tried a few methods earlier involving flat glass pieces and ironing, without any difference.

Bummer, I guess I can but try. Its not a major warp, but its enough to send the head jumping.

 

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Out of curiosity, what's the record?

Its a rare Opeth album.

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post #11 of 28 Old 04-15-2014, 04:44 AM
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if it is not major, you should be able to listen to that part of the record, by increasing the PU-weight -- how much depends on which PU you are using. If you are playing it on audiophile hi-fi equipment, you should probably not got much over 1,5-2 gram.

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post #12 of 28 Old 04-15-2014, 05:13 AM - Thread Starter
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I've tried adjusting the weight but it doesn't seem to make any difference at all.
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post #13 of 28 Old 04-15-2014, 09:55 AM - Thread Starter
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Ok interesting.... I've just tried the record on a cheap alba hifi and it plays fine? Yet it's the only record that doesn't play properly on my pioneer turntable... Thoughts?
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post #14 of 28 Old 04-15-2014, 10:04 AM
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Some record players track warped records better than others. Some cheap turntables have a lot of weight that is applied, which is not good for the longevity of the record, but it sometimes works to play a warped record. I advise you to play it on your cheap turntable only once and record it digitally for future playback.

God willing, we will prevail in peace and freedom from fear and in true health through the purity and essence of our natural fluids. God bless you all.
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post #15 of 28 Old 04-15-2014, 10:40 AM - Thread Starter
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Quote:
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Some record players track warped records better than others. Some cheap turntables have a lot of weight that is applied, which is not good for the longevity of the record, but it sometimes works to play a warped record. I advise you to play it on your cheap turntable only once and record it digitally for future playback.

I do have a digital copy already. I've just fiddled with the pioneer. If i apply almost a gram of weight, it practically touches the record but plays fine. On my other records I can get away with less weight. Guess I'll be adjusting it to play this particular record! Thanks for all your help. It's greatly appreciated.
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post #16 of 28 Old 04-16-2014, 07:25 PM
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When I spin records on a Dj turntable, I rarely use less than 3 grams.
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post #17 of 28 Old 04-16-2014, 11:10 PM - Thread Starter
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When I spin records on a Dj turntable, I rarely use less than 3 grams.

How comes?
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post #18 of 28 Old 04-17-2014, 02:44 AM
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When I spin records on a Dj turntable, I rarely use less than 3 grams.
You don't need 3 grams of tracking force on a hifi TT.
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post #19 of 28 Old 04-17-2014, 09:02 AM - Thread Starter
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You don't need 3 grams of tracking force on a hifi TT.

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You don't need 3 grams of tracking force on a hifi TT.


 True, why would you need as much as 3 grams on a DJ set?

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post #20 of 28 Old 04-17-2014, 10:35 AM
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For cueing, scratching and proper tracking. Sometimes I can go down to 2,2-2,5 g, but less than that usually gives problems. And wearing on records aren't that bad. More than 3,5 g gives fast record cue burn, though.
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post #21 of 28 Old 04-17-2014, 12:51 PM
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For cueing, scratching and proper tracking. Sometimes I can go down to 2,2-2,5 g, but less than that usually gives problems. And wearing on records aren't that bad. More than 3,5 g gives fast record cue burn, though.

I remember when scratching first started and I felt so sorry for the vinyl involved ! LOL!

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post #22 of 28 Old 04-17-2014, 05:12 PM
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I remember when scratching first started and I felt so sorry for the vinyl involved ! LOL!
So did I. Now I'm just sorry for me when I am subjected to the 'music' it produces.
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post #23 of 28 Old 04-18-2014, 02:57 AM - Thread Starter
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So did I. Now I'm just sorry for me when I am subjected to the 'music' it produces.

Heh :) interesting. Well the plates used for dub step on its emergence only lasted around 50 spins. But they were some type of wax weren't they?

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post #24 of 28 Old 04-18-2014, 08:26 AM
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You Arne thinking of acetate dubplates, which are metal plates with acetate on them. You can cut single copy records on these, and do not have to press them. But play count is limited to 50-100 plays depending on pickup and weight. They get very noisy after this, and loses most of the treble. They have been used in reggae music since beginning of the eighties for unique mixes and recordings, also known as "dubplate mixes" and "dubplate specials".
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post #25 of 28 Old 04-18-2014, 10:48 AM - Thread Starter
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You Arne thinking of acetate dubplates, which are metal plates with acetate on them. You can cut single copy records on these, and do not have to press them. But play count is limited to 50-100 plays depending on pickup and weight. They get very noisy after this, and loses most of the treble. They have been used in reggae music since beginning of the eighties for unique mixes and recordings, also known as "dubplate mixes" and "dubplate specials".

I see, are they still used?
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post #26 of 28 Old 04-19-2014, 05:04 AM
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Yes, they are. And are today developed as "vinyl dubplates" which holds 90% of the durability of vinyl records - I have cutted around 60 of these and they don't get the noise as acetates does. And they are not as heavy either. But they lack the distinctive smell.... For more info check dubstudio.co.uk among others.
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post #27 of 28 Old 04-19-2014, 05:09 AM - Thread Starter
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I see, thanks for that. Quite interesting =)
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.
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