Hum FAQ - Page 2 - AVS Forum
Forum Jump: 
Reply
 
Thread Tools
post #31 of 170 Old 12-17-2004, 10:48 AM
Advanced Member
 
HooStat's Avatar
 
Join Date: Apr 2004
Location: Westlake Village, CA
Posts: 601
Mentioned: 0 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 0 Post(s)
Liked: 10
Just to add a note here on 12 V remote triggers. This was the problem on my setup. I have a B&K Ref 50 and the 12 V trigger to the B&K amp caused about half of the noise.

The other half was caused by a Parasound Scamp that I was using to remotely turn on the subwoofer amp.

So when you are looking for sources, especially with subs, don't forget to look here.

And also note that if you have your speakers cutoff at 80 Hz, the only place you will really hear the hum is from your sub since the hum is a relatively low frequency (60 Hz?) signal.
HooStat is offline  
Sponsored Links
Advertisement
 
post #32 of 170 Old 04-23-2005, 06:48 PM
AVS Addicted Member
 
Chu Gai's Avatar
 
Join Date: Sep 2002
Location: NYC area
Posts: 14,781
Mentioned: 0 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 169 Post(s)
Liked: 465
Hum & Buzz in Unbalanced Interconnect Systems is a rather short pdf download.

"I've found that when you want to know the truth about someone that someone is probably the last person you should ask." - Gregory House
Chu Gai is offline  
post #33 of 170 Old 05-27-2005, 06:28 AM
Member
 
vgs86's Avatar
 
Join Date: Jan 2005
Location: Metrowest, MA
Posts: 152
Mentioned: 0 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 0 Post(s)
Liked: 10
I have Athena sub which has slight hum. This is regardless of the input connection. Even after I moved the sub to another power outlet, the hum is still there. It is minor but if there is a way to silence it, I would like to know.

Since this is my first experience with any kind sub, I am not sure if they all do that.

- Vikas
vgs86 is offline  
post #34 of 170 Old 07-25-2005, 08:08 PM
Newbie
 
hmgerard's Avatar
 
Join Date: Jul 2005
Posts: 2
Mentioned: 0 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 0 Post(s)
Liked: 10
I tried to post a message on this but somehow failed. You should add info that "speaker wire" should not be used to route a preamp level subwoofer signal from a source to a subwoofer. The wire needs to be shielded against pickup of 60 Hz from the house wiring! Speaker wire acts like an antenna, picking up enough 60 Hz to cause highly audible hum in the subwoofer. I have seen many postings addressing this question but no replys concerning shielded cable. My hum ceased when I disconnected the "Speaker Wires". It did not come back when I connected 25 ft of shielded (monaural) cable to the subwoofer. When I touched the "bitter end" of the shielded cable the hum returned (I became the antenna for a moment). When I connected the "bitter end" to the subwoofer drive I got zero hum (even with the subwoofer gain turned to max)! My problem is solved and I would like to try to help those who have simply used the wrong kind of wire to hook up the subwoofer. Based on the postings I have seen, a lot of folks are using "speaker wire" for this application....it is not a good idea! Thanks, Henry
hmgerard is offline  
post #35 of 170 Old 08-24-2005, 01:47 PM
Member
 
3D Guy's Avatar
 
Join Date: Jan 2005
Posts: 110
Mentioned: 0 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 0 Post(s)
Liked: 10
Although my audio is fine from my AV reciever, I'm having a "video hum" problem. I was told it was probably similar to an "audio hum" problem and was directed to this thread for possible help.

I was using my InFocus 7210's DVI/MA connection from my DVD/scaler combo and the picture was great, but I found that a lot of DVDs needed help from the PJ's noise reduction feature. Also wanted the option of using the PJ's various "widescreen" settings for 4:3 movies.

Now I've changed to a direct component connection between the DVD player & PJ (Beldon 1694a cables). I did this to enable the PJ's controls for adjusting color, noise reduction, chroma & luma detail, etc...

Now, with my component connection I'm noticing a faint, slowly upwards scrolling "white horizontal line" across the screen. Also, all of the individual mirror/pixels seem to flicker (white) more now than they did with the DVI DVD/scaler combo connection.

Are these "video hum" symptoms of just bad component cables?
An audio grounding problem?
Another AC appliance?
Or just inherent of the component connection?

I didn't have have these video problems with the DVI & DVD/scaler combo, but that setup bypassed the PJ's processing and didn't give me control over some of the settings I wanted to adjust.

My simple left & right channel audio is wired the same no matter which of these 2 video connections is used (DVI or component). It just goes from the DVD player directly to the reciever and sounds fine. No audio hum. The only problem is the "video hum" with the component connection.

Any help would be greatly appreciated.
3D Guy is offline  
post #36 of 170 Old 09-11-2005, 06:54 AM
Senior Member
 
k2koq's Avatar
 
Join Date: Nov 2001
Location: LongIsland NY
Posts: 244
Mentioned: 0 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 0 Post(s)
Liked: 10
k2koq is offline  
post #37 of 170 Old 11-09-2005, 08:58 AM
AVS Special Member
 
cneely8's Avatar
 
Join Date: Jul 2005
Posts: 1,535
Mentioned: 0 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 0 Post(s)
Liked: 10
I used a "hum eliminator" purchased from a local music supply store ($50). It was a 3 minute installation, ground loop buzz/hum problem solved. No rewiring, dedicated lines, connecting components by wiring screws, nothing. Outputs in via rca, and out via rca-to-XLR to Amp. simple and easy. I've seem many products like this that are all around the same price point. Mine was called "buzz off." I'm surprised the first solution seems to always be some kind of rewiring or connecting components in a MacGyver way when I found this simple solution in the music world for the same problem.
cneely8 is offline  
post #38 of 170 Old 11-25-2005, 11:56 AM
Member
 
All Wired Up!'s Avatar
 
Join Date: Sep 2005
Location: St. Peters, MO
Posts: 40
Mentioned: 0 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 0 Post(s)
Liked: 10
Quote:
Originally Posted by DrSpike69 View Post

First you should have one of these where you cable comes in to your house (usually where all utilities, electric, telco, etc.) come in. If you do not, then get one. Next you will ground this to your house ground (cold water pipe or rod) you will see your telco and electric breaker box attached to a place on the cold water pipe or rod, just tie into one of these or get another clamp. That is it, you are done.
isolation transformer.

Be aware that all ground blocks are not the same. Cable and satellite systems have different requirements and should be consulted before changing or adding a ground block.

I would also advise that you ignore the option offered above of grounding to an existing clamp that is already in use unless you think a new $2 clamp is worth giving your life for. NEVER undo an existing ground clamp unless you are professionally trained!

Also, many installers think that grounding to any cold water pipe is acceptable. It's NOT. It can only be the water main within 5' of entering the home IF it is an all metal under ground pipe for at least 10' after it exits the home. If you see a ground on a water pipe other than described you should have it corrected ASAP.
All Wired Up! is offline  
post #39 of 170 Old 11-28-2005, 09:18 PM
AVS Special Member
 
gonzalc3's Avatar
 
Join Date: Nov 2004
Location: Pretoria, South Africa
Posts: 1,225
Mentioned: 0 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 7 Post(s)
Liked: 15
Hi,

I have a hum problem that I haven't been able to solve. First, my apartment had fluorescent
fixtures and when I turned on a switch you could hear a click or hum coming out of the speakers. After this, I replace all the lights in the apartment with regular bulb lamps. This presumably fix the problem for some time..
Second, I had a backlight (the one from cinemaquest with an RFI switch. The switch introduced some noise to the video so I switch it to a different place and is now gone.
Third, I installed a pure AV 60 line conditioner to the system and apparently the noise was gone for some time. After several months the noise is back again... And I really don't know what to do.. In the past I tried going through the isolation transformer route and didn't work out..All of the cables are of high quality, they are the MOnster THX ULTRa cables....


My guess right now, is that the speakers are very sensitive. How can you deal with this?

Or sadly, a component could be faulty? But how do u determine which?

Thanks

Chris.
To view links or images in signatures your post count must be 0 or greater. You currently have 0 posts.

JVC RS65, ST 130, B&W 803 Diamonds mains, B&W HTM2 Diamond center channel,B&W 805 Diamond surrounds, B&W DB1 subwoofer, Anthem D2v, Parasound Halo A51+A21,Oppo BDP 103D,PS Audio Power Plant Premier
gonzalc3 is offline  
post #40 of 170 Old 12-10-2005, 10:12 AM
dxh
Member
 
dxh's Avatar
 
Join Date: Mar 2001
Location: Irving, TX USA
Posts: 18
Mentioned: 0 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 0 Post(s)
Liked: 10
Hi,

I just moved from 1 house to another. In the new house, my system setup did not change at all. In both houses, all my components were one 1 wall plugged into an ADCOM power filter while my monitor and HD TiVo were on another wall plugged into a Monster surge protector.

After the D TV guy game and installed the new dish, I could hear a low hum through my speakers when the system was not turned on. I followed the steps listed in the FAQ and determined that when I unplugged a S Video cable from the back of the TV that connected to my pre amp, the hum stopped. The HD TiVO is connected to the monitor using component video and connected to the pre amp using ToS, a digital audio switching box and a digital coaxial cable.

I checked the dish and, sure enough, it was not grounded at all. I called D TV and they relocated the dish to within 10 feet of the common house ground. I cockily plugged everything back in and (gasp) the hum remains. I even tried unplugging and replugging with the proper amount of humility, but it still hummed!

So, as you can see, I need a little help. I'm confused as to why the exact same set up, connections and equipment would suddenly produce the hum when, for the last 6 years, it has been flawless.

Thanks for the help.
dxh is offline  
post #41 of 170 Old 03-04-2006, 08:10 AM
Senior Member
 
Andre Smith's Avatar
 
Join Date: Apr 2002
Location: Denver, Colorado
Posts: 309
Mentioned: 0 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 1 Post(s)
Liked: 12
Are any of the 8 conductors in a CAT-5 ethernet cable conected to ground? If I have an ethernet port on my computer that has a sound card connected to my receiver, does connecting the ethernet cable to the network create an additonal ground path?
Andre Smith is offline  
post #42 of 170 Old 07-27-2006, 10:04 PM
Senior Member
 
vett93's Avatar
 
Join Date: Jun 2006
Location: Silicon Valley, California
Posts: 283
Mentioned: 0 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 0 Post(s)
Liked: 10
Quote:
Originally Posted by HooStat View Post

Just to add a note here on 12 V remote triggers. This was the problem on my setup. I have a B&K Ref 50 and the 12 V trigger to the B&K amp caused about half of the noise.

The other half was caused by a Parasound Scamp that I was using to remotely turn on the subwoofer amp.

So when you are looking for sources, especially with subs, don't forget to look here.

And also note that if you have your speakers cutoff at 80 Hz, the only place you will really hear the hum is from your sub since the hum is a relatively low frequency (60 Hz?) signal.

How did you fix the problem caused by 12V remote triggers? I have a power amp connecting to the pre-outs of a receiver. It worked fine until I use the 12V remote trigger.

How do I get rid of the hum in this case?
vett93 is offline  
post #43 of 170 Old 08-15-2006, 01:48 PM
AVS Special Member
 
shamus's Avatar
 
Join Date: Nov 2005
Posts: 6,254
Mentioned: 0 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 0 Post(s)
Liked: 13
Yipee... my first hum problem. After installing a new component to my system (Buttkicker), I noticed noise in my speakers I never had before. After realizing it went away after unplugging th Buttkicker, I thought I had a faulty one....not so fast. Further investigating, I noticed out of all my components, the Buttkicker was the only device that had a ground plug, all of which is plugged into my monster power surge protector. Well it turns out after disconnecting the Cable to my HT, the hum went away. Im convinced now that the problem is the Cable and not the Buttkicker... I believe by the Buttkicker being the first device that has the third plug it simply unmasked the problem...... It also improved it slightly to not run the Cable line through the Monster bar, but directly to the Cable box. Now what do I do????? The Cable is grounded outside to the Electric meter and the house is grounded to the Water pipe..... Any suggestions?????????????????? Thanks.
shamus is offline  
post #44 of 170 Old 08-15-2006, 02:36 PM
AVS Club Gold
 
Keenan's Avatar
 
Join Date: Aug 2003
Location: Santa Rosa, CA
Posts: 28,311
Mentioned: 0 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 350 Post(s)
Liked: 404
Try a DC blocker, or ground breaker, on the incoming cable TV line.

Example at the bottom of the page at the below link.

http://www.hometech.com/video/atten.html
RF Attenuators, Filters, & DC Blockers - HomeTech Solutions
Keenan is online now  
post #45 of 170 Old 08-15-2006, 03:45 PM
AVS Special Member
 
shamus's Avatar
 
Join Date: Nov 2005
Posts: 6,254
Mentioned: 0 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 0 Post(s)
Liked: 13
thanks!!!
shamus is offline  
post #46 of 170 Old 08-27-2006, 03:36 PM
AVS Special Member
 
FreeBaGeL's Avatar
 
Join Date: Apr 2006
Location: Titletown, FL
Posts: 1,879
Mentioned: 0 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 1 Post(s)
Liked: 14
I've run into a problem with speaker buzzing and I'm not sure on the cause. I've done a bit of reading up on it but am pretty bad in the audio field.

I have a cable box, xbox 360, and DVD player hooked up to my Samsung HL-S6187 TV and Yamaha HTR-5860 receiver.

Recently I hooked up my PC to the TV, and the sound to my receiver. I now get the buzzing sound out of all my speakers only when I am on the PC input.

Another thing that may be causing the issues is that I have the PC across the room, and the audio is run through a 3.5mm to RCA stereo converter and then through 25ft Red/White analog stereo cable to the receiver. Could this cable length be the problem or am I likely at the mercy of a ground loop or something of that sort?

XBL & PSN: Vcize

Hit me up on XBL if you're going to be playing
To view links or images in signatures your post count must be 0 or greater. You currently have 0 posts.
 or the
To view links or images in signatures your post count must be 0 or greater. You currently have 0 posts.

FreeBaGeL is offline  
post #47 of 170 Old 09-27-2006, 07:32 PM
Member
 
jws43yale's Avatar
 
Join Date: Aug 2006
Posts: 60
Mentioned: 0 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 0 Post(s)
Liked: 10
I am having the same problem with humming that I can't figure out. I have a HK AVR 340 and I have run a 35' RCA cable from my mini-out on my computer to the reciever. The cable runs by one surge protector, my computer speakers subwoofer, and then parallel to a RF TV cable for about 10'. I know the output is clean and am wondering if this problem could be cause by anything more than just too long of a cable.
jws43yale is offline  
post #48 of 170 Old 09-28-2006, 12:56 AM
AVS Club Gold
 
Keenan's Avatar
 
Join Date: Aug 2003
Location: Santa Rosa, CA
Posts: 28,311
Mentioned: 0 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 350 Post(s)
Liked: 404
Years ago I hooked up my computer to my AVR and had the same problem. It's a ground loop as the computer was on a different circuit from the AVR. I used one of the below devices from Radio Shack, it solved the hum problem. There are probably more elegant solutions available including putting the computer on the same circuit, but the device below did the job. It's labeled as being for car audio but the principal is the same, they may even have one specifically for home audio.

http://www.radioshack.com/product/in...entPage=search
RadioShack.com - Car: Accessories: Car A/V accessories: Ground Loop Isolator
Keenan is online now  
post #49 of 170 Old 11-01-2006, 10:48 AM
Newbie
 
HardStyle's Avatar
 
Join Date: Nov 2006
Posts: 8
Mentioned: 0 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 0 Post(s)
Liked: 10
was very helpfull thanks
HardStyle is offline  
post #50 of 170 Old 11-02-2006, 10:50 AM
Senior Member
 
Schwingding's Avatar
 
Join Date: Nov 2005
Location: Glen Arm, (Baltimore) MD
Posts: 476
Mentioned: 0 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 0 Post(s)
Liked: 10
Quote:
Originally Posted by jws43yale View Post

I am having the same problem with humming that I can't figure out. I have a HK AVR 340 and I have run a 35' RCA cable from my mini-out on my computer to the reciever. The cable runs by one surge protector, my computer speakers subwoofer, and then parallel to a RF TV cable for about 10'. I know the output is clean and am wondering if this problem could be cause by anything more than just too long of a cable.

It can be. Since you need a very long cable to connect your computer to your receiver, I am going to guess that they may be on different electrical circuits. The ground potential of those circuits may be very different, even though the neutrals and grounds of both may be connected to the same bus bar in the breaker panel. This could definitely be a cause of your hum.

I had a similar problem when I ran a dedicated circuit for some components and used an existing one for another. There were many outlets, and lights on the one circuit, but only the AV components on the other. The problem disappeared when I connected everything to the same circuit, but this was too big of a load, so I ran an additional dedicated circuit. No problems.

If this is the case for you, you could verify it by temporarily using an extension to connect all the components (and computer) to the same circuit.
Schwingding is offline  
post #51 of 170 Old 11-06-2006, 07:24 PM
Advanced Member
 
swest's Avatar
 
Join Date: Mar 2003
Location: Goodyear, AZ
Posts: 692
Mentioned: 0 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 0 Post(s)
Liked: 10
Quote:
Originally Posted by vett93 View Post

Quote:
Originally Posted by HooStat View Post

Just to add a note here on 12 V remote triggers. This was the problem on my setup. I have a B&K Ref 50 and the 12 V trigger to the B&K amp caused about half of the noise.

How did you fix the problem caused by 12V remote triggers? I have a power amp connecting to the pre-outs of a receiver. It worked fine until I use the 12V remote trigger.

How do I get rid of the hum in this case?

Yes, how did you?

When I originally called B&K with this question, they instructed me to sever the ground of the 12v connection (i.e. leave 'tip' connected, but sever 'sleeve'). This worked swimmingly.

However, another poster has raised a question about this solution (see post http://www.avsforum.com/avs-vb/showt...&&#post8831624 and following). I called back to B&K today to get a second opinion on this solution, and they confirmed its acceptability. Thoughts?

"That's not what he said, y'ignorant wretch. Your Spanish is worse than your English."
swest is offline  
post #52 of 170 Old 11-10-2006, 01:22 PM
Advanced Member
 
kiwi2000's Avatar
 
Join Date: Jan 2003
Location: Canada
Posts: 827
Mentioned: 0 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 0 Post(s)
Liked: 10
Quote:
Originally Posted by keenan View Post

Years ago I hooked up my computer to my AVR and had the same problem. It's a ground loop as the computer was on a different circuit from the AVR. I used one of the below devices from Radio Shack, it solved the hum problem. There are probably more elegant solutions available including putting the computer on the same circuit, but the device below did the job. It's labeled as being for car audio but the principal is the same, they may even have one specifically for home audio.

http://www.radioshack.com/product/in...entPage=search
RadioShack.com - Car: Accessories: Car A/V accessories: Ground Loop Isolator

Please explain how exactly this product would work as it appears to have two male ends at each end. How does it incorporate into the system? Do you need one for each component?
kiwi2000 is offline  
post #53 of 170 Old 11-10-2006, 03:26 PM
AVS Club Gold
 
Keenan's Avatar
 
Join Date: Aug 2003
Location: Santa Rosa, CA
Posts: 28,311
Mentioned: 0 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 350 Post(s)
Liked: 404
Quote:
Originally Posted by kiwi2000 View Post

Please explain how exactly this product would work as it appears to have two male ends at each end. How does it incorporate into the system? Do you need one for each component?

No, just use it between the two. I'm trying to recall how I had it hooked up, I used a stereo phono mini-jack to dual RCA converter plugged into the PC. It looks like the thing on the left in the following link only it had female RCA jacks on the one side and stereo phono on the other side for the PC. They have them at RS.

http://www.radioshack.com/product/in...entPage=family
RadioShack.com - Cables, Parts & Connectors: Connectors & connectivity: A/V connectors & adapters: Gold Series 4-Piece Headphone Adapter Set

Just plug the RCA end into whatever input you want on your AVR, you may need to run a longer connecting cable. It worked okay, but nowadays many sound cards come with SPDIF outputs which can provide a much cleaner and probably better sounding connection, as long as the card handles Dolby Digital output.
Keenan is online now  
post #54 of 170 Old 11-10-2006, 06:02 PM
Advanced Member
 
swest's Avatar
 
Join Date: Mar 2003
Location: Goodyear, AZ
Posts: 692
Mentioned: 0 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 0 Post(s)
Liked: 10
I used one of those RS ground loop interruptors for a while, until I found out the spec's on them:

Ground LP Isolator (270-0054) Specifications Faxback Doc. # 9542

ELECTRICAL DATA:

Impedance Ratio:
Z1:Z2................................................1000 Ohms:600 Ohms
Z1:Z2................................................1000 Ohms:600 Ohms
Frequency Response:.............................300 Hz to 4000 Hz +/- 3 dB
DC Resistance:...............................................@2 5 degrees C
Z1:....................................................200 Ohms +/- 20%
Z2:....................................................150 Ohms +/- 20%
Insulation:.........................500 VDC apply to primary and secondary
more then 100 Meg Ohms Min.

(ALL-01/26/95)

I don't know what the performance is outside the 300-4000Hz. I was using it for my subwoofer, and I swapped it out for an ART DTI (which is good down to 10Hz.)

"That's not what he said, y'ignorant wretch. Your Spanish is worse than your English."
swest is offline  
post #55 of 170 Old 11-10-2006, 06:08 PM
AVS Club Gold
 
Keenan's Avatar
 
Join Date: Aug 2003
Location: Santa Rosa, CA
Posts: 28,311
Mentioned: 0 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 350 Post(s)
Liked: 404
The RS solution is certainly not an ideal one if you want reasonably high quality analog playback, best to get a SPDIF Dolby Digital soundcard and go that route. There are probably other hum blockers that work better, the RS one was the first that came to mind.
Keenan is online now  
post #56 of 170 Old 11-11-2006, 09:42 PM
Advanced Member
 
Tnedator's Avatar
 
Join Date: Jul 2001
Posts: 663
Mentioned: 0 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 125 Post(s)
Liked: 34
I originally posted this in one of the projector forums, but it was suggested that I check here for help.

---------------

Trust me, I have searched a bunch on the forum, but can't find my answer.

All of my components (two Tivo's, DVD player, Yamaha receivers) are at the front of my room, and the projector (IN76) is at the back of my room. The outlets they are plugged into are on seperate circuit breakers.

The best I can tell, all equipment is properly grounded, including the Sattelite multiswitch outside and the sattelite dish on the roof.

I have a couple rolling bars slowly moving from the bottom of the screen to the top. If I put one of the 3 prong to 2 prong adapters on the IN76 power cord (eliminating the ground) the ground loop bars go away. So, it appears clear it is a ground loop.

The IN76 is plugged into a CyberPower UPS (550va), which I originally bought because we have frequent 1-3 second power outages during thunderstorms and I was trying to protect the projector/bulb. Obviously, this UPS is doing no line conditioning. I think this is the model (I bought it at Best BuY), but can't get to it easily right now to to confirm the model number. http://www.cyberpowersystems.com/CP550SL.asp

So, it appears that I need a line conditioner, or a UPS/Line Conditioner combo. I read in one thread that plugging a line conditioner into a UPS can be a fire hazard and void home owners insurance, but I don't know if that is true.

So, what is my best bet? It appears I need something with a floating ground setup (not even 100% sure what that means ), but I also need to keep my projector on a UPS because of the power outages.

I would rather not spend several hudred dollars if I can help it, so I would like the cheapest possible solution that will cover my ground loop issue and protect me from the thunderstorm power outages.

Thanks
Tnedator is offline  
post #57 of 170 Old 11-12-2006, 09:23 AM
AVS Club Gold
 
Keenan's Avatar
 
Join Date: Aug 2003
Location: Santa Rosa, CA
Posts: 28,311
Mentioned: 0 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 350 Post(s)
Liked: 404
Is there something else plugged into the same circuit the IN76? The best thing to do would be to get them on the same circuit somehow. Would running a sufficiently gauged extension cable back to the IN76 be too obtrusive? Have you considered having an electrician coming in and tying the circuits together? If you have any experience with wiring you could probably do it yourself.

My first guess would be that something else is plugged into the IN76 circuit, some dimmer style lights maybe, could even be in a different room. Try turning on everything in the house and then flipping the breaker the IN76 is on and see what else is on the circuit.
Keenan is online now  
post #58 of 170 Old 11-12-2006, 10:07 AM
Advanced Member
 
Tnedator's Avatar
 
Join Date: Jul 2001
Posts: 663
Mentioned: 0 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 125 Post(s)
Liked: 34
An extension cord wouldn't work as it is a front and back wall and no way to run an extension cord, except through the ceiling, and I am afraid that would be a no/no with fire code/home owners insurance. I will try turning everyhing on and flipping the breaker.

Would the electrician simply replace the two breakers (hooked to the outlets at the front and back of the room) with one larger one and tie those to legs together, or would he need to run a line from the front outlet to the back and tie only the one outlet that the IN76 is using into the same breaker as the front outlets.

Also, will a line/power conditioner fix this without the rewiring, or is this not the type of problem that a line conditioner fixes?
Tnedator is offline  
post #59 of 170 Old 11-12-2006, 10:28 AM
AVS Club Gold
 
Keenan's Avatar
 
Join Date: Aug 2003
Location: Santa Rosa, CA
Posts: 28,311
Mentioned: 0 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 350 Post(s)
Liked: 404
Regarding the line conditioning, I'm not an expert, but I doubt that would solve the problem unless you got the kind that had it's own power supply/transformer in it, and those I think are pretty expensive.

You could try running both circuits off of one breaker, one that is spec'ed for the load of course, and see what happens. That's something you could try yourself, be sure to throw the service disconnect though to make sure there is no power in the area of the panel you are working with.

Depending on the topography of the circuits in the room, it shouldn't be too hard a job for an electrician to create one circuit to tie all the equipment together.

You're going to spend money with an electrician, but I think the result will be better than spending money on power line conditions, etc. to try and solve the problem.
Keenan is online now  
post #60 of 170 Old 11-22-2006, 05:52 AM
Senior Member
 
Winkelmann's Avatar
 
Join Date: Nov 2006
Location: Atlanta, Georgia
Posts: 422
Mentioned: 0 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 0 Post(s)
Liked: 10
I am building a dedicated theater. The utility room is behind one of the side walls and the electrical panels are housed in the 2x6 wall. I am going to build a 2x4 wall for sound isolation from furnace units and water heater exhaust fans.

The question: Should I expect electrical interference problems from the electrical panels (I think they both bring in 600amp loads)?
If so, is there a way to shield against any potential problems?

Winkelmann

Please visit The Cuban Underground
Winkelmann is offline  
Reply Audio theory, Setup and Chat

User Tag List

Thread Tools
Show Printable Version Show Printable Version
Email this Page Email this Page


Forum Jump: 

Posting Rules  
You may not post new threads
You may not post replies
You may not post attachments
You may not edit your posts

BB code is On
Smilies are On
[IMG] code is On
HTML code is Off
Trackbacks are Off
Pingbacks are Off
Refbacks are Off