Save power in your home cinema - AVS Forum
Forum Jump: 
 
Thread Tools
post #1 of 21 Old 02-08-2010, 10:10 AM - Thread Starter
Member
 
TelevisionsFlo's Avatar
 
Join Date: Jan 2010
Location: Munich
Posts: 40
Mentioned: 0 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 0 Post(s)
Liked: 10
Save power in your home cinema

Home cinemas can produce annual energy bills that run into the hundreds but it's not always the obvious offenders that do the most damage.
Turning off your TV at the socket might only save you a couple of bucks each year, while the hidden consumers continue to draw tens of watts without the user realising.

Chargers and power supplies are especially worth keeping an eye on: Many people don't realise that the transformers used in these will keep drawing approximately the same amount of power, whether or not the actual device is switched on.

Satellite receiver systems and active subwoofers are another one to watch, since both are often hidden away out of sight, out of mind. According to our example calculations, switching the entire home cinema off at the socket can reduce the amount of power wasted by around 80 percent.

But where else are there savings to be made? One option that people mightn't think of immediately is to calibrate their TV. In our tests, we reduced the TV's annual power consumption by 20 percent.
You can also choose a TV with power saving in mind new technologies such as LED backlights and local dimming mean TVs now consume far less power than their predecessors.

Never trust the power-consumption values in the manufacturer's specifications. Although the standby power consumption is now limited by (european) law to one watt, and this value can therefore be trusted, manufacturers still try all kinds of tricks to make the operating power consumption seem lower. As with all such measurements, it's best to rely on independent reviews.
Read more about reducing your home cinema's power consumption in Televisions.com's article Power-Saving TV Technologies.

Please let us know when you have additional tipps to save power in hometheaters.

Florian Friedrich,
CEO of www.avtop.com, journalist and independent consultant from munich in germany.
TelevisionsFlo is offline  
Sponsored Links
Advertisement
 
post #2 of 21 Old 02-09-2010, 04:19 AM
Advanced Member
 
docrings's Avatar
 
Join Date: Dec 2002
Location: Gulf Breeze, FL -- Soundside
Posts: 784
Mentioned: 0 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 0 Post(s)
Liked: 10
From my testing using a Kill-a-watt meter, most of my transformers drop to near zero power consumption without the electronic device pluggged into it... just my experience.

I had my entire home theater system power conditioner/UPS plugged into my Kill-a-watt meter.

The readings were:
1094 total hours monitored
71.03 kwh total used.

So, in the 1094 hours (or 45 days) I used about $7.00 of electricity.

That is about $5 a month for a 61" LED RPTV Samsung, PS3 for blu-ray, Xbox 360 for gaming, a Harmon-Kardon HK635 5.1 amplifier and a monster power conditioner. The only thing not plugged into the meter was my SVS subwoofer..

Regards,

Doc Rings

Quote:
Originally Posted by TelevisionsFlo View Post

Save power in your home cinema

Home cinemas can produce annual energy bills that run into the hundreds — but it’s not always the obvious offenders that do the most damage.
Turning off your TV at the socket might only save you a couple of bucks each year, while the hidden consumers continue to draw tens of watts without the user realising.

Chargers and power supplies are especially worth keeping an eye on: Many people don’t realise that the transformers used in these will keep drawing approximately the same amount of power, whether or not the actual device is switched on.

Satellite receiver systems and active subwoofers are another one to watch, since both are often hidden away — out of sight, out of mind. According to our example calculations, switching the entire home cinema off at the socket can reduce the amount of power wasted by around 80 percent.

But where else are there savings to be made? One option that people mightn’t think of immediately is to calibrate their TV. In our tests, we reduced the TV’s annual power consumption by 20 percent.
You can also choose a TV with power saving in mind — new technologies such as LED backlights and local dimming mean TVs now consume far less power than their predecessors.

Never trust the power-consumption values in the manufacturer’s specifications. Although the standby power consumption is now limited by (european) law to one watt, and this value can therefore be trusted, manufacturers still try all kinds of tricks to make the operating power consumption seem lower. As with all such measurements, it’s best to rely on independent reviews.
Read more about reducing your home cinema’s power consumption in Televisions.com’s article Power-Saving TV Technologies.

Please let us know when you have additional tipps to save power in hometheaters.

docrings is offline  
post #3 of 21 Old 02-09-2010, 03:49 PM
AVS Special Member
 
golffnutt's Avatar
 
Join Date: Apr 2003
Posts: 1,403
Mentioned: 0 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 0 Post(s)
Liked: 11
Quote:
Originally Posted by TelevisionsFlo View Post

Save power in your home cinema

Home cinemas can produce annual energy bills that run into the hundreds but it's not always the obvious offenders that do the most damage.
Turning off your TV at the socket might only save you a couple of bucks each year, while the hidden consumers continue to draw tens of watts without the user realising.

Chargers and power supplies are especially worth keeping an eye on: Many people don't realise that the transformers used in these will keep drawing approximately the same amount of power, whether or not the actual device is switched on.

Satellite receiver systems and active subwoofers are another one to watch, since both are often hidden away out of sight, out of mind. According to our example calculations, switching the entire home cinema off at the socket can reduce the amount of power wasted by around 80 percent.

But where else are there savings to be made? One option that people mightn't think of immediately is to calibrate their TV. In our tests, we reduced the TV's annual power consumption by 20 percent.
You can also choose a TV with power saving in mind new technologies such as LED backlights and local dimming mean TVs now consume far less power than their predecessors.

Never trust the power-consumption values in the manufacturer's specifications. Although the standby power consumption is now limited by (european) law to one watt, and this value can therefore be trusted, manufacturers still try all kinds of tricks to make the operating power consumption seem lower. As with all such measurements, it's best to rely on independent reviews.
Read more about reducing your home cinema's power consumption in Televisions.com's article Power-Saving TV Technologies.

Please let us know when you have additional tipps to save power in hometheaters.

In your statement above, "switching the entire home cinema off at the socket", are you suggesting that I/we unplug every electrical component from the wall socket when we are not watching/listening to it?

Thank you.

Golffnutt

"GO DAWGS" !!!!!!!!!!!!!!
golffnutt is offline  
post #4 of 21 Old 02-10-2010, 02:05 AM
Senior Member
 
SlackerX's Avatar
 
Join Date: Dec 2003
Location: Tucson, AZ
Posts: 413
Mentioned: 0 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 0 Post(s)
Liked: 10
Quote:
Originally Posted by golffnutt View Post

In your statement above, "switching the entire home cinema off at the socket", are you suggesting that I/we unplug every electrical component from the wall socket when we are not watching/listening to it?

If you installed some x10 or other home automation devices that have either IR or RF control, you could use a universal remote to turn off all appliances or devices that are plugged into various outlets in the home. You could also utilize them for turning on/off and dimming lights as well as other useful tasks.

There's a fairly rich forum right here on AVS that discusses all sorts of things related to automating the home theater. These devices themselves are also very low power. An alternative to using a remote could be making sure that everything that doesn't require constant power is connected to a switched outlet so you could just make sure to turn off the switch when the devices are not in use.

Here's the link to the AVS home theater automation forums. It's a very good resource: http://www.avsforum.com/avs-vb/forumdisplay.php?f=10/
SlackerX is offline  
post #5 of 21 Old 02-11-2010, 03:41 PM
Advanced Member
 
irfan's Avatar
 
Join Date: Jul 2005
Location: Columbus, OH
Posts: 597
Mentioned: 0 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 0 Post(s)
Liked: 15
Quote:
Originally Posted by golffnutt View Post

In your statement above, "switching the entire home cinema off at the socket", are you suggesting that I/we unplug every electrical component from the wall socket when we are not watching/listening to it?

Or you could flip the switches on the surge protectors
irfan is offline  
post #6 of 21 Old 03-07-2010, 07:18 AM
AVS Special Member
 
Fabricator's Avatar
 
Join Date: Feb 2009
Location: far sw sub chicago
Posts: 1,749
Mentioned: 0 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 0 Post(s)
Liked: 11
Quote:
Originally Posted by golffnutt View Post

In your statement above, "switching the entire home cinema off at the socket", are you suggesting that I/we unplug every electrical component from the wall socket when we are not watching/listening to it?

i always turn mine off. in case of lightning etc.

chasing rattles ......

Pro8100 Cult member
Fabricator is offline  
post #7 of 21 Old 03-07-2010, 10:24 AM
 
mjg100's Avatar
 
Join Date: Dec 2006
Posts: 9,112
Mentioned: 0 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 0 Post(s)
Liked: 13
Quote:
Originally Posted by SlackerX View Post

If you installed some x10 or other home automation devices that have either IR or RF control, you could use a universal remote to turn off all appliances or devices that are plugged into various outlets in the home. You could also utilize them for turning on/off and dimming lights as well as other useful tasks.

There's a fairly rich forum right here on AVS that discusses all sorts of things related to automating the home theater. These devices themselves are also very low power. An alternative to using a remote could be making sure that everything that doesn't require constant power is connected to a switched outlet so you could just make sure to turn off the switch when the devices are not in use.

Here's the link to the AVS home theater automation forums. It's a very good resource: http://www.avsforum.com/avs-vb/forumdisplay.php?f=10/

I don't think you can use x10 for amps. I buy mechanical relays and build them into short extension cords or power strips and use those. I need them because I use pro amps that do not have a remote control option and my equipment is in a rack in a mechanical room on another floor. I just built another one last Friday. The relay cost $2.50 plus $1.50 for shipping (I bought 3 so I prorated for 1). I bought a box for it for $3.21. I already had a piece of 12 gauge extension cord, romex clamps, old two prong power cord and female plug. So was able to built a switched outlet for $8.21. The relay is 120 volt activation so you can plug it into the switched outlet on your AVR and use it to power another outlet or another power strip.

In my rack I have three pro amps, two HT amps, AVR, TV tuner, DVD player and a remote control eye. The only items in stand by power mode are the remote control eye and the AVR. Everything else is off until the AVR is powered on.
mjg100 is offline  
post #8 of 21 Old 03-21-2010, 11:50 AM
Newbie
 
kateross's Avatar
 
Join Date: Mar 2010
Posts: 4
Mentioned: 0 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 0 Post(s)
Liked: 10
The tips above are very useful. Thanks a lot.
kateross is offline  
post #9 of 21 Old 03-22-2010, 03:25 PM
AVS Addicted Member
 
CINERAMAX's Avatar
 
Join Date: Sep 2000
Location: everywhere
Posts: 12,462
Mentioned: 0 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 81 Post(s)
Liked: 42
Don't buy a digital cinema xenon based projector should be tip number one if you are conscious of your carbon footprint.
CINERAMAX is offline  
post #10 of 21 Old 05-10-2010, 03:58 AM
Newbie
 
darren111's Avatar
 
Join Date: May 2010
Posts: 7
Mentioned: 0 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 0 Post(s)
Liked: 10
do you have a forum or can you share a post where i get the information about what to do in high voltage or over voltage condition or a spike in voltage.
darren111 is offline  
post #11 of 21 Old 05-10-2010, 09:06 AM
 
duvetyne's Avatar
 
Join Date: Dec 2008
Posts: 1,635
Mentioned: 0 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 0 Post(s)
Liked: 13
Quote:


Many people don't realise that the transformers used in these will keep drawing approximately the same amount of power, whether or not the actual device is switched on.

Where does all the energy go when it's switched off, yet stll "consuming the same amount of power"?
duvetyne is offline  
post #12 of 21 Old 05-12-2010, 12:28 PM
Member
 
apexdown's Avatar
 
Join Date: May 2010
Posts: 76
Mentioned: 0 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 0 Post(s)
Liked: 10
Quote:
Originally Posted by duvetyne View Post

Where does all the energy go when it's switched off, yet stll "consuming the same amount of power"?


Mostly turned into heat via resistance. Though that's the well designed equipment some manufactures are much worse. I remember reading about a plasma screen that used around 200 watts when turned off.
apexdown is offline  
post #13 of 21 Old 05-13-2010, 02:12 PM
 
duvetyne's Avatar
 
Join Date: Dec 2008
Posts: 1,635
Mentioned: 0 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 0 Post(s)
Liked: 13
Quote:


Mostly turned into heat via resistance.

No, when something is turned off it doesn't consume the same amount of power as when it was on. Lightbulbs would never go dark....that's magic!
duvetyne is offline  
post #14 of 21 Old 05-14-2010, 07:43 PM
Newbie
 
vanslide's Avatar
 
Join Date: Nov 2007
Posts: 1
Mentioned: 0 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 0 Post(s)
Liked: 10
It's true that lightbulbs don't use any power when turned off because the switch would eliminate all current, but I have tested transformers that can use almost the same power without the unit being turned on. For example, chargers, modems, routers, landline phones, etc. Basically anything with the big box that plugs into the wall. Your tv, recievers, amps, subs would likely also have internal transformers. Most of these still use around 5-10 watts even when off. And if you touch them you can feel a bit of heat that is essentially wasted energy. Some units are worse than others. Newer units tend to target 1-2 watts.
However, if I saw a TV that was using 200 watts while off I would seriously question if it was a defective unit.
vanslide is offline  
post #15 of 21 Old 05-27-2010, 12:42 PM
Member
 
Alanp's Avatar
 
Join Date: Jun 2003
Location: Tigard, Oregon
Posts: 121
Mentioned: 1 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 0 Post(s)
Liked: 10
Good ideas, but in my main system when turned off, the largest power draw is the DVR at over 30 watts! And there's really no way to cut it's power, since I need it making it's timed recordings.
Alanp is offline  
post #16 of 21 Old 05-27-2010, 04:39 PM
 
duvetyne's Avatar
 
Join Date: Dec 2008
Posts: 1,635
Mentioned: 0 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 0 Post(s)
Liked: 13
Quote:


but I have tested transformers that can use almost the same power without the unit being turned on.

You must have tested one that had a load connected or was faulty.
duvetyne is offline  
post #17 of 21 Old 05-28-2010, 03:49 AM
Newbie
 
Austin Kort's Avatar
 
Join Date: May 2010
Posts: 4
Mentioned: 0 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 0 Post(s)
Liked: 10
True fact. I always switch off mine. Saving electricity is a must.
Austin Kort is offline  
post #18 of 21 Old 07-08-2010, 08:23 PM
Member
 
pinseeker's Avatar
 
Join Date: Jul 2010
Posts: 19
Mentioned: 0 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 0 Post(s)
Liked: 10
great thread, very informative.
pinseeker is offline  
post #19 of 21 Old 07-13-2010, 06:55 PM
AVS Special Member
 
Cap'n Preshoot's Avatar
 
Join Date: Aug 2006
Location: Cinco Ranch West (Houston suburb)
Posts: 1,122
Mentioned: 0 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 0 Post(s)
Liked: 11
Quote:
Originally Posted by pinseeker View Post

great thread, very informative.

The kill-a-watt meter (about $25 or so) was the best investment I ever made! With it I discovered that our entire home theater system (MITS 65" RPTV, Wii, Yamaha tuner-amp, Sub, blu-Ray and 1400-va Tripp-Lite UPS) pulls 80 watts with everything "turned off". The big TV stays on an average of 12 hours every day and with all combined was pulling 475 watts! The major energy pig is the RPTV itself, so we're looking for a buyer and planning to replace it with a 55 or 60" led backlit set and already have a very small UPS to hold just the Sat DVR through brief interruptions of 15 mins or less, just to avoid those nuisance power bumps. Not there yet, but our goal is to cut HT consumption by 50% when viewing (all day) and to cut standby/off consumption by at least that same amount. The big RPTV also generates a LOT of heat.

.

The PAY TV industry does not hold the patent on poor customer relations, but Comcast in particular has succeeded in making an art form of it.

Cap'n Preshoot is offline  
post #20 of 21 Old 07-16-2010, 07:53 AM
AVS Special Member
 
vitod's Avatar
 
Join Date: Dec 2003
Posts: 3,099
Mentioned: 0 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 0 Post(s)
Liked: 10
I shut all the HT breakers at the electrical panel when not in use.

Evil is Good
vitod is offline  
post #21 of 21 Old 07-18-2010, 12:29 AM
Member
 
Troopa's Avatar
 
Join Date: May 2010
Posts: 15
Mentioned: 0 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 0 Post(s)
Liked: 10
My fat PS3 draws up to 40w when idle
Im guessing its so that Bluethooth can still bring the unit out of standby

Tom
Troopa is offline  
Reply Community News & Polls

User Tag List

Thread Tools
Show Printable Version Show Printable Version
Email this Page Email this Page


Forum Jump: 

Posting Rules  
You may not post new threads
You may not post replies
You may not post attachments
You may not edit your posts

BB code is On
Smilies are On
[IMG] code is On
HTML code is Off
Trackbacks are Off
Pingbacks are Off
Refbacks are Off