Soundproofing Your Home Theater - Part One: The Basics - AVS Forum
Forum Jump: 
 
Thread Tools
post #1 of 18 Old 01-04-2011, 09:22 AM - Thread Starter
Senior Member
 
Bob Hetherington's Avatar
 
Join Date: May 2008
Posts: 296
Mentioned: 0 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 0 Post(s)
Liked: 13
Soundproofing Your Home Theater - Part One: The Basics
Author: Alan Lofft, Axiom


Overhead view of dual layers of sheetrock: place silicone caulk between
the layers as well as where the sheetrock attaches to the studs.

As much as we all love home theater movie soundtracks and music at realistic playback levels (realistic does not necessarily mean extremely loud), most of us have to deal with other people in our livesfamily, roommates, companions, younger children and/or older relatives in the house, or neighbors in nearby, adjacent or adjoining homes. Even if you live in the woods or on the plains, there is still the pervasive problem of preventing the sounds that you enjoy from traveling through your dwelling's structure to other rooms to annoy those who may not appreciate your late-evening movie or music tastes.

An added benefit of soundproofing your home theater room will be that the soundproofed room will also keep annoying noise and outside sounds from entering the room. You'll have created a peaceful and quiet sanctuary in your home that shuts out the noise and clamor of daily life, be it car horns, coffee grinders, leaf blowers, or loud music on inferior playback systems (even those with wheels attached). Quiet spaces bring a measure of tranquility to our lives.

That said, soundproofing is a rather complex subject best treated in several articles.

Different approaches are required for new home construction or for soundproofing a room in an existing home. Soundproofing after the fact may involve building a room within a room, literally, depending on just how much sound you want to keep in and keep out of the room.

Read the complete article at HomeToys.com
Bob Hetherington is offline  
Sponsored Links
Advertisement
 
post #2 of 18 Old 01-04-2011, 02:46 PM
Advanced Member
 
irfan's Avatar
 
Join Date: Jul 2005
Location: Columbus, OH
Posts: 597
Mentioned: 0 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 0 Post(s)
Liked: 15
good article. I need to soundproof the mechanical room in my dental office and will likely use some of those tips.
irfan is offline  
post #3 of 18 Old 01-05-2011, 02:24 PM
Member
 
kayo_michael's Avatar
 
Join Date: Aug 2009
Location: Babylon, NY
Posts: 53
Mentioned: 0 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 0 Post(s)
Liked: 10
Is this a rerun of the same article from 2006? I thought silicone as a dampener was debunked?
My take away from the discussion here in the archive from then was that silicone is no where near as effective as Green Glue.

Anyone?

PS3: Nikola_Tesla1856
kayo_michael is offline  
post #4 of 18 Old 01-06-2011, 06:02 AM
Senior Member
 
the_phew's Avatar
 
Join Date: Jun 2006
Posts: 305
Mentioned: 0 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 0 Post(s)
Liked: 11
Green Glue is relatively cheap, and tests have proven its effectiveness. If you are paying for two layers of drywall, you might as well use the proper damping material between them.
the_phew is offline  
post #5 of 18 Old 01-06-2011, 02:03 PM
Member
 
bh285's Avatar
 
Join Date: Jul 2003
Location: Seattle, WA
Posts: 84
Mentioned: 0 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 0 Post(s)
Liked: 10
In my experience, silicone (the good kind, such as 30 year Silicone II) works well as a gap filler when used in sufficient quantities, and maintains flexibility when filling gaps between fixed structural framing and floating wall systems.

In my non-scientific opinion, after working with Greenglue and Silicone both, I think it would be a poor dampener when used as shown in the illustration. My guess is that you would end up with only the benefits of double drywall.

In remodel work, whisper clips and hat channel, double drywall and greenglue, have consistantly shown the best results per dollar, as reported by many of the dedicated theater forum users.

bh285 is offline  
post #6 of 18 Old 01-07-2011, 11:28 AM
AVS Special Member
 
Ted White's Avatar
 
Join Date: May 1999
Location: Midland, MI USA
Posts: 8,186
Mentioned: 0 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 0 Post(s)
Liked: 32
The silicone myth has been busted by many, including at least one independent lab. It's an urban legend, like egg cartons

__________________

Ted



The Soundproofing Company
Ted White is offline  
post #7 of 18 Old 01-07-2011, 02:12 PM
Senior Member
 
Datagg's Avatar
 
Join Date: Dec 2009
Location: AZ
Posts: 281
Mentioned: 0 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 0 Post(s)
Liked: 12
This may be something you guys haven't thought of yet when i lived in NY we used to sound proof apartments, to bathroom walls even each of the ballrooms in the Marriott hotel in upstate NY.

This product is called Cellulose and it is used for insulation. The type we used is the blown in material. A typical install would be drilling a 1 inch hole in the wall cavity and via a 1 inch nozzle, pump the material in there under pressure. When done, you had a great insulator and a fantastic sound barrier. There are other methods to applying yet this was the most common way.

In AZ here, we spray it on open walls prior to drywall, spray it on ceilings, or into attics for the insulation property, yet also for a sound barrier that works extremely well as we have heard from 1000's of our customers. I even did my attic here and walls in AZ with it.

Just wanted to share as this would be a very viable option for existing homes to even new builds for sound proofing.
Datagg is offline  
post #8 of 18 Old 01-07-2011, 02:26 PM
AVS Special Member
 
Ted White's Avatar
 
Join Date: May 1999
Location: Midland, MI USA
Posts: 8,186
Mentioned: 0 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 0 Post(s)
Liked: 32
Hello Datagg, Thanks for that. Properly installed blown-in insulation can be nice. However, I've grown to not be a fan of blown in insulation, both cellulose and fiberglass. I've seen too many installs where the insulation got hung up on wire, etc. and then backed up. This compresses the insulation, which means some areas have no insulation, while the backed up areas now conduct a vibration.

This is even worse when the ceiling is decoupled with channel, as the blown in insulation can really lock up the flex of the channel.

__________________

Ted



The Soundproofing Company
Ted White is offline  
post #9 of 18 Old 01-07-2011, 02:35 PM
Senior Member
 
Datagg's Avatar
 
Join Date: Dec 2009
Location: AZ
Posts: 281
Mentioned: 0 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 0 Post(s)
Liked: 12
Quote:
Originally Posted by Ted White View Post

Hello Datagg, Thanks for that. Properly installed blown-in insulation can be nice. However, I've grown to not be a fan of blown in insulation, both cellulose and fiberglass. I've seen too many installs where the insulation got hung up on wire, etc. and then backed up. This compresses the insulation, which means some areas have no insulation, while the backed up areas now conduct a vibration.

This is even worse when the ceiling is decoupled with channel, as the blown in insulation can really lock up the flex of the channel.

Hi ted. Yes that is true it can get hung up at times. Allot depended on the company who did the install and the equipment used. For instance, the Home Depot machines don't pack enough blower power to compress or even fill the cavity up well. When people wanted to use those machines, we highly advised against it.. yet if they insisted, we told them to drill to sets of holes, maybe even three per each cavity to ensure proper compression & a good luck hand shake. 90% of the time people who did there own called us to fix it.

We used a machine called the Force 2. It had enough power to not only blow down a cavity, it would even go up 4 feet ensuring a properly condensed and compact install. We were also savvy enough to know if cavity took less than it should which would always dictate we drilled another hole lower, or upper. Firewalls were a huge issue also, which were easily determined by the time and amount of insulation that went in. So the proper machine and experience is key.

Not saying this by any means is the best method to sound proof, yet it is a viable solution to an existing structure without tearing things apart.
Datagg is offline  
post #10 of 18 Old 01-11-2011, 09:23 AM
Senior Member
 
Datagg's Avatar
 
Join Date: Dec 2009
Location: AZ
Posts: 281
Mentioned: 0 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 0 Post(s)
Liked: 12
Like all options success depends on proper installation.
Datagg is offline  
post #11 of 18 Old 01-12-2011, 08:23 AM
 
mariasabio123's Avatar
 
Join Date: Jan 2011
Posts: 8
Mentioned: 0 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 0 Post(s)
Liked: 10
Soundproofing a home theater increases the sound experience. it increases the bass and treble experience to an amazing extent.
mariasabio123 is offline  
post #12 of 18 Old 01-12-2011, 09:09 AM
AVS Special Member
 
Ted White's Avatar
 
Join Date: May 1999
Location: Midland, MI USA
Posts: 8,186
Mentioned: 0 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 0 Post(s)
Liked: 32
Quote:
Originally Posted by Datagg View Post

Like all options success depends on proper installation.

I agree 100%. Absolutely true. Furthermore much success depends on the experience of the crew. I'm sure your crew produces fine results.

__________________

Ted



The Soundproofing Company
Ted White is offline  
post #13 of 18 Old 01-13-2011, 06:53 PM
Member
 
Taylor26's Avatar
 
Join Date: Mar 2008
Posts: 23
Mentioned: 0 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 0 Post(s)
Liked: 10
According to the STC ratings, insulating the wall with FG (on its own) doesn't contribute much. I wonder though how much of this is due to the poor performance of FG for sound-deadening. Are there comparative figures for Roxul? Are there figures for Bonded Logic, the FG alternative that is made from recycled denim.

I've heard of the staggered studs, it does double the amount of work in building the wall. Also there's going to be bridging at rough openings and the ends of the walls. Is there any formula for figuring out how much performance loss is due to such deadening? I have heard that thermal bridging for stud walls can reduce efficiency of insulation by 40%. Would it be easier to put up sheets of 3/4" foamboard, covered with furring strips and then dry-walled? Would this accomplish anything in sound-proofing?
Taylor26 is offline  
post #14 of 18 Old 01-14-2011, 07:15 AM
AVS Special Member
 
Ted White's Avatar
 
Join Date: May 1999
Location: Midland, MI USA
Posts: 8,186
Mentioned: 0 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 0 Post(s)
Liked: 32
In a wall, all medium / low density insulation works similarly. You can spend a lot or a little, and get very similar results.

Insulation provides a bigger payback with sound isolation when incorporated in a decoupled assembly. Same with mass. The same mass or insulation will provide more improvement (STC points) on a decoupled wall than a coupled wall

__________________

Ted



The Soundproofing Company
Ted White is offline  
post #15 of 18 Old 01-14-2011, 07:37 AM
Senior Member
 
Datagg's Avatar
 
Join Date: Dec 2009
Location: AZ
Posts: 281
Mentioned: 0 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 0 Post(s)
Liked: 12
Quote:
Originally Posted by Ted White View Post

In a wall, all medium / low density insulation works similarly. You can spend a lot or a little, and get very similar results.

Insulation provides a bigger payback with sound isolation when incorporated in a decoupled assembly. Same with mass. The same mass or insulation will provide more improvement (STC points) on a decoupled wall than a coupled wall

Well said Ted
Datagg is offline  
post #16 of 18 Old 01-15-2011, 05:02 AM
Member
 
Norman Varney's Avatar
 
Join Date: Apr 2002
Location: Ohio
Posts: 28
Mentioned: 0 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 0 Post(s)
Liked: 10
Be cautious to avoid adding an RC to an existing surface. You can actually increase sound transmission at some critical frequencies.
Norman Varney is offline  
post #17 of 18 Old 01-15-2011, 05:24 AM
Member
 
Norman Varney's Avatar
 
Join Date: Apr 2002
Location: Ohio
Posts: 28
Mentioned: 0 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 0 Post(s)
Liked: 10
I see many good questions regarding noise control in this post. Several articles worth. In general, and every job has its unique constraints, for noise control you have to understand the sound source (its frequency and energy levels) and its transmission path(s) to the receiver. Then you can determine the best means of blocking, breaking, absorbing and/or isolating, which usually means a system design combining several methods.

Constrained layer damping is very effective, but only when used in conjunction with insulation, acoustic sealants, etc. A very small unsealed area can take a high STC rated wall, floor or ceiling system and reduce it to half the rating. Note that doors are your biggest enemy.
Norman Varney is offline  
post #18 of 18 Old 01-25-2011, 04:27 PM
Member
 
brnagin4's Avatar
 
Join Date: Jul 2002
Location: Louisiana
Posts: 35
Mentioned: 0 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 0 Post(s)
Liked: 10
I am trying to sell out of my quiet rock soundproofing. I recently sold my av company and have the 3x8 sheets of 525 on sale for $35 and the 4x12 sheets on sale for $45 each. This was my preferred method of soundproofing for theaters when I owned my company. Email me at brnagin4@me.com I'll email you the eBay auction or we can work it out. Www.quietsolution.com

Shhh did you hear that? Oh, you need better equipment!!
brnagin4 is offline  
Reply Community News & Polls

User Tag List

Thread Tools
Show Printable Version Show Printable Version
Email this Page Email this Page


Forum Jump: 

Posting Rules  
You may not post new threads
You may not post replies
You may not post attachments
You may not edit your posts

BB code is On
Smilies are On
[IMG] code is On
HTML code is Off
Trackbacks are Off
Pingbacks are Off
Refbacks are Off