Is the End of Physical Media Inevitable? - Page 25 - AVS Forum
View Poll Results: Is the End of Physical Media Inevitable?
Yes, physical media will quickly disappear altogether 23 2.16%
Yes, physical media will slowly disappear altogether 198 18.63%
No, new physical formats will continue to be developed 371 34.90%
No, but physical media will become a niche market for enthusiasts 471 44.31%
Voters: 1063. You may not vote on this poll

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post #721 of 920 Old 05-06-2013, 09:06 AM
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Agreed... And hopefully my current set up will last long enough that 8K will be reasonably priced when I do need a new flat panel (Maybe PJ?!?)

I wouldn't mind having a 1Tb Reader/Writer in my PC... Hopefully not requiring something more than the I-7 CPU & motherboard I currently have. As previously stated, I think 1 Tb discs have quite a future outside the 4K/8K movie realm.

This would most definitely solve the steaming/download issue many have... And also enables those of us that like to have the physical media permanently in our libraries. I imagine that the current BD disc programs many use to "back up" their movies to a server/NAS might work just as well also.
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post #722 of 920 Old 05-06-2013, 04:07 PM
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Here you go.... Pay attention to the only three-digit number below. This should tell you where the world is going and on which side you are on:

http://www.degonline.org/pressreleases/2012/DEG_FIRST_HALF_2012_HOME_ENTERTAINMENT_REPORT_Final_EXT_7_29_12.pdf


U.S. CONSUMER SPENDING BY FORMAT FIRST HALF 2012 (Summary excerpts only)

Sell-Thru Packaged Goods -All: -3.64%

Brick and Mortar Rental: -26.09%

Kiosk: 22.96%


Electronic Sell-Thru: 21.86%

VOD: 11.59%

Subscription Streaming: 430.14%

The kiosk part I find interesting, although it's most likely blockbusters and horror movies, appealing to the 7-11 clientele.

Interestingly, today Adobe announced they will no longer provide their software on physical media.
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post #723 of 920 Old 05-06-2013, 11:19 PM
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Which side I am on?

Why do you insist on relating this in terms of conflict, with you on the "winning" side?

Rentals are down in Brick & Mortar, up in Kiosks... Kiosks are in 7-11's, McD's, almost everywhere, and more convieniant than going to a dedicated store for rental. No big suprise there. These are view once (or as many times as you can during the "rental period"), then return. No building to rent, employees to pay... a no brainer in terms of a profit for a business model.

VOD and Streaming have increased (streaming quite significantly, yup). This is simply due to convieniance... same as the Bricks & Mortar vs Kiosk model already mentioned. I might stream a particularly good series, or several of them, to watch on my schedule rather than max out the DVR's memory... something I wouldn't purchase on a DVD/Blu-ray, but that is again for convieniance. I'll bet I'm not alone in those regards.

But packaged goods is only down 3.64%... yet the 11+% VOD & 430+% streaming gains you proudly profess should have made a huge impact on packaged goods sales, but they haven't!

"Where the world is going?" - those numbers are for the US only... sort of egotistical to extrapolate that data to the entire planet and their viewing habits.

People will continue to want their physical media, and for a variety of reasons. Just because you don't care for it, doesn't make you "right" or "winning"... and I'm not the only one who has percieved this attitude as an "air of superiority" while you try to convince others who do not share your opinion the falicy of their wants/wishes/needs. Everyone has their own opinion, and I enjoy reading them. I do appreciate the numbers you provide. But to digress to "winners and losers" seems to be going to far... something that can and does infect many threads (Plasma vs LCD, 3D good vs bad).

And once again, this has far greater implications than just on how one views movies in the comfort of their home!
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post #724 of 920 Old 05-07-2013, 07:07 AM
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Here's the "side" I am on. Getting the best quality media into my home theater, and some semblance of "ownership" for the media that I purchased. In the case of downloads that would mean having the ability to make a backup of my purchases, play them offline, etc.
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post #725 of 920 Old 05-07-2013, 03:18 PM
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Originally Posted by AVTrauma View Post

Which side I am on?

Why do you insist on relating this in terms of conflict, with you on the "winning" side?...

Well, what answers do you expect when the thread is named "Is the End of Physical Media Inevitable?"

I am merely pointing to the numbers, which do not bode well for physical media.

Is it going to totally disappear? Not likely, just like Vinyl has not and just like people still use Polaroids.

But the market will move to streaming, and rather fast. It's just an opinion, but at least it's backed by some data.

And the people who have Tivo (and thus more likely cable/satellite) and complain about the quality of their $7 per month Netflix HD stream quality..., I honestly don't know what to say. wink.gif
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post #726 of 920 Old 05-07-2013, 03:21 PM
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TiVo and Netflix are two entirely different things. With TiVo, once you've recorded a program, it's "yours" in that you can hang onto it until your ready to delete it. You don't have to worry about a contract expiring and a TV series you are watching getting yanked when you are right in the middle of it.

Also, of course, TiVo lets you skip ads, and they appease advertisers by providing some valuable data on what ads don't get skipped, what programs people are viewing (via anonymized data), etc.

You don't have ads on Netflix today but I highly doubt that it will be the case once physical media and other options are really on the decline. Better yet, you won't have the ability to skip ads on a stream, at least not for quite a while until some kind of "DVR like" buffering device becomes available to allow you to capture and manipulate programs from streaming services. Obviously such a device will face substantial legal and technical challenges compared to what TiVo had to go through.

As to the quality of video on TiVo, it pretty much kicks the crap out of Netflix. Series that are shown in 1080i (like CSI for example) look absolutely outstanding. You also don't have to worry about buffering or down-resolution of the show while you are in the middle of watching it.
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post #727 of 920 Old 05-07-2013, 04:13 PM
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TiVo and Netflix are two entirely different things. With TiVo, once you've recorded a program, it's "yours" in that you can hang onto it until your ready to delete it. ...

You don't have ads on Netflix today but I highly doubt that it will be the case once ....

As to the quality of video on TiVo, it pretty much kicks the crap out of Netflix....

Oh, boy. The last TIVO I had was so many years ago, I hardly remember. But I miss it about as much as I miss my film camera and my VCR.

FYI, TIVO and all other DVRs may (and will) delete content depending on the flag set by the provider.

Much of the content you record on TIVO (CSI... OK) has commercials TODAY. So you are arguing that we should all stick with TIVO, because Netflix too MAY one day have commercials? Really?!

The quality? Again, most cable/satellite channels are compressed considerably more than anything found on most modern streaming services, including Netflix. But hey, who am I to argue about quality? I can't even see the pixels on my 60" screen from 10 feet....

BTW, since I am speaking to Swedish Murder, I just finished watching Wallander (the British version) on Netflix. If you haven't seen it, it's a very good show -- often nonsensical stories, but well acted and directed, and it's possible the most beautifully set and shot crime show I've ever seen, by far.

And it all looked great on Netflix. Without having to reach for the remote to fast-forward the commercials.... biggrin.gif
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post #728 of 920 Old 05-07-2013, 06:14 PM
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Comcast HD channels are not compressed anywhere close to what is done for streaming. As to TiVo auto deleting content you are mistaken. The copy protect flag prevents you from copying a program, it cannot automatically delete it.
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post #729 of 920 Old 05-08-2013, 02:30 AM
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Oh, boy. The last TIVO I had was so many years ago, I hardly remember. But I miss it about as much as I miss my film camera and my VCR.

FYI, TIVO and all other DVRs may (and will) delete content depending on the flag set by the provider.

No DVR I ever saw ever did this, unless the user is silly enough to allow it to auto-delete old recordings to make way for new ones when it's running out of space on the hard-drive. Most DVR's, in fact, have the facility to set a delete-protect flag to prevent the user from deleting stuff accidentaly, that they want
to keep.

Some DVR's that are tied to a content provider - for example, Sky Television here in the UK has it's Sky+ boxes, which are DVR's as well as receivers - have the facility to auto-delete pay-per-view items; in other words, they only allow you to time shift those.

And some content can be flagged in DVR's that have optical drives to prevent the user from transferring it to a DVD - but that it just standard DRM.
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Much of the content you record on TIVO (CSI... OK) has commercials TODAY. So you are arguing that we should all stick with TIVO, because Netflix too MAY one day have commercials? Really?!

The quality? Again, most cable/satellite channels are compressed considerably more than anything found on most modern streaming services, including Netflix. But hey, who am I to argue about quality? I can't even see the pixels on my 60" screen from 10 feet....

BTW, since I am speaking to Swedish Murder, I just finished watching Wallander (the British version) on Netflix. If you haven't seen it, it's a very good show -- often nonsensical stories, but well acted and directed, and it's possible the most beautifully set and shot crime show I've ever seen, by far.

And it all looked great on Netflix. Without having to reach for the remote to fast-forward the commercials.... biggrin.gif

Netflix doesn't have commercials yet. The same way that lots of TV services didn't when they started up either.

The industry always plays this game: new services are kept cheap and advert free with great material that may be unavailable any other way. In fact, they are often loss leaders - again, that's exactly how subscription satellite services were here in the UK. The receivers were subsidised (and still are 'free' with a minimum subscription contract), the channels were mostly advert and junk free and lots of them showed rarities that hadn;t been seen for years.

It all changed when the consumer base reached a critical mass.

You can expect that once streaming becomes the default and dominant way the viewers gets content, espescially if they abandon their DVD/BD players in favour of it - which means that actual disc releases will become a niche product - you will inevitably start to get unskippable trailers, ad breaks, onscreen logos and all the rest of the junk that infests every sort of broadcast content. WHich is what streaming really is - broadcast.

The cheap prices and clean content are simply loss-leader hooks to get that critical mass of subscribers. You won't get people switching from buying a DVD to paying a subscription that reflects actual costs with content that is infested with ads, even if they get the instant gratification 'click it and see it' factor. So you'll get the crap and higher prices after most people have switched and have locked themselves into the brave new world.
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post #730 of 920 Old 05-08-2013, 09:54 AM
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If one ignores the quality (or lack of quality material available to them for a variety of reasons) issue....
Forget about the eventual "pay to play, every single time you play" direction streaming will undoubted be headed towards...
Don't mind that streaming will eventually have commercials and promo's to deal with....

Look at the numbers! A 430+% increase in streaming subscribers, yet only a 3.64% decrease in packaged media sold. Looks to me like even many of the streamer enthusiasts still want their physical media too! Steaming does offer an alternative to satellite and cable service providers, but it seems to me those folks are also purchasing DVDs and Blu-rays. This appears to be the most logical conclusion from where I'm sitting, can anyone offer a different and reasonable conclusion for this huge disparity?

Does anyone think the physical media manufacturers (Fuji et al) will not fight tooth and nail to keep their status quo?
Think Panasonic, Samsung even Sony will abandon the profit they attain in selling their players?
I think there would be tremendous backlash by more than just the consumer against this occurring.

I don't have any crystal ball or some power that enables me to foresee the future... And I don't know of anyone else that does either. This thread is pure speculation based on what each feels will eventually transpire. I suspect we are a long way off from Blu-rays ( and their 4K/8K successors ) disappearing, much less becoming a "niche" market. By that time, pigs may actually fly, we will all have at least one wall in every room that is an OLED screen, and chips will be implanted in all newborns' brains so we won't even have to "click to play"..... But then again, I may be wrong!
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post #731 of 920 Old 05-08-2013, 10:29 AM
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Originally Posted by AVTrauma View Post

Look at the numbers! A 430+% increase in streaming subscribers, yet only a 3.64% decrease in packaged media sold. Looks to me like even many of the streamer enthusiasts still want their physical media too!

As a physical media diehard, I believe you are optimistically seeing a glass 10% full. When people flocked to DVD, sales of VHS tapered-off over a 10 year period, they didn't plummet in a year or two. Your numbers look similar, with physical media gradually receding into a niche role.

Young people are not buying shiny disks anymore for music or movies.

I do take seriously your forecasts of streaming media going pay-per-view and filled with ads. Sounds about par for the course.

BTW, why do we have to pay $15 for physical media, then must repeatedly fast-forward through unsolicited previews? Or pay $12 for a movie ticket in a theater and be bombarded by ads?

I think we are making an artificial distinction between ownership of media and pay-per-view. People will have their own lifelong space in the cloud to store their digital purchases. Aren't we pretty much already there now? Kindle books are permanently backed-up at Amazon, for instance. There are services to purchase/store both compressed and uncompressed music. A personal Blu-ray-quality video is hardly a leap.
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post #732 of 920 Old 05-08-2013, 10:32 AM
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Does anyone think the physical media manufacturers (Fuji et al) will not fight tooth and nail to keep their status quo?

What happened to the 8-track tape manufacturers?



Physical media storage, in the sense of having one movie stored on an object, makes no sense anymore. Of course it is doomed, looking down the road 20 years. I assume we'll be able to keep both a local copy on a storage device, as well as a cloud backup.
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post #733 of 920 Old 05-08-2013, 12:10 PM
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I think we are making an artificial distinction between ownership of media and pay-per-view. People will have their own lifelong space in the cloud to store their digital purchases. Aren't we pretty much already there now? Kindle books are permanently backed-up at Amazon, for instance. There are services to purchase/store both compressed and uncompressed music. A personal Blu-ray-quality video is hardly a leap.

So Amazon will be here for 25+ years so that if I want to re-read a treasured book I purchased this year it will still be available? I would call that a bit of a leap of faith... it is certainly possible, and it's also possible that if something happened to Amazon that another player would step up to snap up their customer base and fulfill those obligations, but I would hardly take it for granted.

Look at who the big players were in the tech space 25 years ago. Plenty of "big names" at the time have gone out of business or their businesses have changed radically to the point (as in the case of IBM) they aren't even offering any of the same products they were offering 25 yrs ago.

Convince a CEO of Amazon, Apple, etc, who have moved on to other ventures that they need to shell out 10's of millions of dollars a year maintaining the infrastructure for your cloud purchases and see how they react.

We are heading towards a PPV model for all of this stuff... books included.
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post #734 of 920 Old 05-08-2013, 03:12 PM
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So Amazon will be here for 25+ years so that if I want to re-read a treasured book I purchased this year it will still be available? I would call that a bit of a leap of faith... it is certainly possible, and it's also possible that if something happened to Amazon that another player would step up to snap up their customer base and fulfill those obligations, but I would hardly take it for granted.

Look at who the big players were in the tech space 25 years ago. Plenty of "big names" at the time have gone out of business or their businesses have changed radically to the point (as in the case of IBM) they aren't even offering any of the same products they were offering 25 yrs ago.

Convince a CEO of Amazon, Apple, etc, who have moved on to other ventures that they need to shell out 10's of millions of dollars a year maintaining the infrastructure for your cloud purchases and see how they react.

We are heading towards a PPV model for all of this stuff... books included.

The thing is most people just don't view things this way, how much space do you waste and heat to store hundreds of books for 25 years? Most people don't they sell them or throw them out. If you really want to read a treasured book 25 years later, most people are comfortable with buying it again. Libraries dump millions of books for a buck each every year, they always have, people buy and destroy those books, once it goes out of print its gone and most people cannot afford the space or time to manage their own library. Now days you can fit it all on a single hard disk and if you really are paranoid about it all then learn how to rip the product and store it, and keep up with the times and formats making sure to convert it. The world cant operate on the niche people who actually keep things that long and it won't. Pretty sure there is not a single VHS tape from 25 years ago left in my entire family and even if we found some up the attic we would have no way to play it since all those bad VCRs broke.

Personally I don't have a large problem with a PPV model because I think they will need to lower the prices in order to get the customers in well. And ultimately much like when video games moved to steam the prices will come down on average.

Amazon might be gone in 25 years but someone will be there and the library of available movies, music and books will be bigger and more accessible then it ever was with a hard copy anything.
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post #736 of 920 Old 05-08-2013, 04:25 PM
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The thing is most people just don't view things this way, how much space do you waste and heat to store hundreds of books for 25 years? Most people don't they sell them or throw them out. If you really want to read a treasured book 25 years later, most people are comfortable with buying it again. Libraries dump millions of books for a buck each every year, they always have, people buy and destroy those books, once it goes out of print its gone and most people cannot afford the space or time to manage their own library. Now days you can fit it all on a single hard disk and if you really are paranoid about it all then learn how to rip the product and store it, and keep up with the times and formats making sure to convert it. The world cant operate on the niche people who actually keep things that long and it won't. Pretty sure there is not a single VHS tape from 25 years ago left in my entire family and even if we found some up the attic we would have no way to play it since all those bad VCRs broke.

Personally I don't have a large problem with a PPV model because I think they will need to lower the prices in order to get the customers in well. And ultimately much like when video games moved to steam the prices will come down on average.

Amazon might be gone in 25 years but someone will be there and the library of available movies, music and books will be bigger and more accessible then it ever was with a hard copy anything.

Wow... I do not agree with your book analogy at all. My wife and I were laughing because we have a room dedicated to books. Of couse we don't keep them all, the bad ones, but we try to buy hardbacks when we can. My wife is an avid reader and has a kindle, but still prefers an actual book and most people I know do. I think steaming or digital downloads as another method of getting your entertainment, but not a one-stop solution that'll replace everything else. Just because it works for you, doesn't mean it works for everyone.

As for PPV, don't use it. Tried with Netflix and Amazon and was disappointed with both and I have 75mbps internet speeds. The quality is not there and by the time they get good 1080P, we'll be on 4k. So no time soon and even then, the things I love, I want to own digital or not.

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post #737 of 920 Old 05-08-2013, 04:36 PM
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There are two distinct issues at play here.
1) Media format
2) Consumer market

A digital download can't be resold. Very few people get rich renting their way through life.

Nobody gets rich by selling off their DVD collection, either.


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Comcast HD channels are not compressed anywhere close to what is done for streaming. As to TiVo auto deleting content you are mistaken. The copy protect flag prevents you from copying a program, it cannot automatically delete it.

Apples to oranges. With offline compression and MPEG-4AVC, you can crank out some really nice video at low bitrates. With online encoding of MPEG-2 and fully constrained bitrates, things can get ugly quick, even with a lot more bandwidth.
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Apples to oranges. With offline compression and MPEG-4AVC, you can crank out some really nice video at low bitrates. With online encoding of MPEG-2 and fully constrained bitrates, things can get ugly quick, even with a lot more bandwidth.

That's no joke. I was never all that impressed with Cable TV, if there was ever any reason I used to think Netflix was not so bad, it's the shoddy quality of on-demand cable.


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post #740 of 920 Old 05-08-2013, 04:57 PM
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The thing is most people just don't view things this way, how much space do you waste and heat to store hundreds of books for 25 years? Most people don't they sell them or throw them out. If you really want to read a treasured book 25 years later, most people are comfortable with buying it again. Libraries dump millions of books for a buck each every year, they always have, people buy and destroy those books, once it goes out of print its gone and most people cannot afford the space or time to manage their own library. Now days you can fit it all on a single hard disk and if you really are paranoid about it all then learn how to rip the product and store it, and keep up with the times and formats making sure to convert it. The world cant operate on the niche people who actually keep things that long and it won't. Pretty sure there is not a single VHS tape from 25 years ago left in my entire family and even if we found some up the attic we would have no way to play it since all those bad VCRs broke.

Personally I don't have a large problem with a PPV model because I think they will need to lower the prices in order to get the customers in well. And ultimately much like when video games moved to steam the prices will come down on average.

Amazon might be gone in 25 years but someone will be there and the library of available movies, music and books will be bigger and more accessible then it ever was with a hard copy anything.

You seem to have no problem with re-buying things as long as they are available digitally in some shape or form. Have a nice time with that. I have a 3300 square foot house (with another 1800 sq ft in the basement), so I don't exactly get into a fit about storage of media or worried if storing my CDs, BDs and books results in my heating bill in the winter costing $1 more a month. If anything I suppose I could take all of that stuff and insulate my basement with it.

You seem to be making an effort to paint me as a luddite (holed up clutching my "ancient" physical media), but I have a 12TB storage array in my basement, and HTPCs and Boxee Boxes (as well as some Squeezeboxes) sprinkled around the house so I can enjoy my media whenever and wherever I want. In fact I'd say that I'm pretty far ahead of the curve on that.

Consumers should not need to look into transcoding, cracking DRM, etc, in order to protect their purchase. If a consumer "buys" a digital download, whether it be a book, movie, etc, they should have the right to make a backup or have some kind of protection that the company that sold them the item will make it available if they go out of business.

To put the question to you another way, you have no idea with re-buying content, what about protection of your family photos and videos? Do you care? Do you trust an ISP or cloud backup company to protect your family memories?
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post #741 of 920 Old 05-08-2013, 04:59 PM
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Nobody gets rich by selling off their DVD collection, either.

Actually even the "bargain basement" stuff has value. Many of the DVDs that I purchased for $5-10 still regularly go for close to that price on eBay. Many BDs I purchased for $12-20 are worth at least 50% of what I paid for them.

While I'm not going to "get rich" re-selling my media, it does have value, and that value is not negligible as you've implied. Last time I took a math class 20-30-40-50% of something is more than zero (which is your resale value of download content) Perhaps one day when physical media is dead they will essentially be worthless. LPs were worthless for years, people could not give them away. Now people go to garage and estate sales looking for old record that are in good condition because some of them are quite valuable.
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post #742 of 920 Old 05-08-2013, 05:02 PM
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That's no joke. I was never all that impressed with Cable TV, if there was ever any reason I used to think Netflix was not so bad, it's the shoddy quality of on-demand cable.

While it is true that cable systems have to make use of less efficient MPEG-2 until they are able to eventually switch to MPEG-4, the streams for their premiere channels still look noticeably better than Netflix (at least as of a year ago). You don't seem to realize that the bitrates that they can push over baseband coaxial cable infrastructure is huge compared to the paltry 10-30mbps connections most consumers have for internet access.
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post #743 of 920 Old 05-08-2013, 05:10 PM
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While it is true that cable systems have to make use of less efficient MPEG-2 until they are able to eventually switch to MPEG-4, the streams for their premiere channels still look noticeably better than Netflix (at least as of a year ago). You don't seem to realize that the bitrates that they can push over baseband coaxial cable infrastructure is huge compared to the paltry 10-30mbps connections most consumers have for internet access.

Yes, the premium channels look good, as do the premium pay-per-view options. But they definitely charge a premium price for the privilege.

 

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While I'm not going to "get rich" re-selling my media, it does have value, and that value is not negligible as you've implied. Last time I took a math class 20-30-40-50% of something is more than zero (which is your resale value of download content).

 

Yes, I suppose you can get lucky and purchase a bunch of of movies that eventually become valuable; Perhaps concert videos and special editions, I don't know. Didn't happen to me. I suppose a collector is more likely to have done that than a non-collector—so sure, used DVDs and Blu-rays are still fungible goods. 


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post #744 of 920 Old 05-08-2013, 05:45 PM
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"Premium" channels include network channels and certain others like Discovery, etc. they look very very good.

As far as resale goes, the point I am making is that my BD and DVD library that I paid say $4500 is still worth at least $1500. Probably more. $4500 spent on streaming and downloads is worth $0.
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post #745 of 920 Old 05-08-2013, 05:54 PM
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post #746 of 920 Old 05-08-2013, 07:35 PM
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Yes, the studios tried to make it illegal to re-sell DVDs and we see how that worked out for them. As long as sale of physical media is accounting for a reasonable percentage of sales it is difficult to see them pulling the plug.

Look at the backlash against Adobe this week from all over the Internet over their decision to only sell CS as a per month rental. The backlash is ferocious. I see a lot of people fleeing to Aperture and other products as a DIRECT result. No one wants to pay Adobe $600 a year just to use their tools. If you have 10 illustrators working for you that cost is going to be $5000+ a year even with volume licensing.
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post #747 of 920 Old 05-08-2013, 08:45 PM
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So Amazon will be here for 25+ years so that if I want to re-read a treasured book I purchased this year it will still be available? I would call that a bit of a leap of faith....

Your iTunes purchases are not going away. Similarly, amazon's stewardship of your digital assets has huge commercial value, Amazon or some future purchaser of Amazon will preserve the data.
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post #748 of 920 Old 05-08-2013, 08:56 PM
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Originally Posted by PobjoySpecial View Post

If you own a product, then you can sell the product. If you can sell the product, then you apply downward pressure on the price companies can charge .

If you sell the media that you own, it likely at a lower price than you payed, as media tends to decrease in value over time. So effectively you've rented the product.

I do see your point about a secondary market for physical media applying downward pressure on prices. But this is a small effect, the studio makes most of their sale with the initial release. And lower production for non-physical products reduces prices as well.
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post #749 of 920 Old 05-08-2013, 09:31 PM
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Originally Posted by Richard Burger View Post

If you sell the media that you own, it likely at a lower price than you payed, as media tends to decrease in value over time. So effectively you've rented the product.

I do see your point about a secondary market for physical media applying downward pressure on prices. But this is a small effect, the studio makes most of their sale with the initial release. And lower production for non-physical products reduces prices as well.

The REAL bottom line isn’t even whether the quality of streaming is as good, or even better, than physical media. Many of the people that have posted here are not only movie lovers, they’re “collectors”. If you don’t get any physical media than what’s the point? People used to buy records or cassette tapes? The only reason that market is virtually gone is because those people now download them for nothing...or at the least, very cheap. They wanted to be able play them anytime they want to, not when they happened to be played on the radio.

What's obvious here is that nobody here will EVER completely agree (on anything). When or if the film companies ever did stop making physical media available, they would be in for a VERY large loss of revenue (and it wouldn't be because of their imaginary piracy claims), since they WON’T be getting money from the people that made this market viable in the first place and demand physical media.....and at this point in time, they're the majority of the market.

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post #750 of 920 Old 05-08-2013, 09:46 PM
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Your iTunes purchases are not going away. Similarly, amazon's stewardship of your digital assets has huge commercial value, Amazon or some future purchaser of Amazon will preserve the data.

See, the problem is, you don't know that, so you shouldn't state it as a fact.

I am not opposed to streaming and I am not opposed to digital downloads. However, physical media still has some advantages, that some advocates of streaming refuse to acknowledge, and one of them is the fact that once you've purchased a media item on physical disc, it's yours.

If I could download an MKV file that had the same quality I get from a Blu-ray disc, and I could play it back on the devices of my choice without jumping through studio hoops, I would be more than happy to start purchasing "downloads" and stop buying discs. As it is though, I have a very high degree of confidence that if I want to watch something in 10+ years, the disc will still "work" where-as there is no guarantee that the digital download will.

I have a friend whose significant other spends over $200 on cable PPV per month. She would have zero problems whatsoever embracing streaming wholeheartedly because she already has the "watch it once and move on" attitude that seems to be prevalent with streaming proponents. For someone who perhaps is a little more "picky" about what they watch, and if it's something they like wants a physical copy of it, streaming is not there yet.
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