How Well Can You Control Ambient Daylight In Your Home Theater? - Page 2 - AVS Forum
View Poll Results: How Well Can You Control Ambient Daylight In Your Home Theater?
I have total control; I can make it pitch black by day 130 42.76%
I have partial control, but I can't make it completely dark 155 50.99%
I have no control of daylight in the room 19 6.25%
Voters: 304. You may not vote on this poll

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post #31 of 56 Old 06-27-2014, 04:34 PM
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My living room is like Sodoma and Gomorrah, day light comes in raping my viewing experience, thats why I will see movies with my about to buy projector only at night
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post #32 of 56 Old 06-27-2014, 07:01 PM
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My theater is in the basement which has bay windows. Even though I had stuck black cardboards on windows, but the 5% outside light could still sneak through the blinds at day time. Most likely I should use thicker cardboards.
The ceiling, 4 walls, disc racks and a door next to the screen are white. Cannot change color because of wife's objection. But I managed to post some black cardboards to black out the entire front wall. In other words, only the screen is white but the front wall is basically black. This definitely help a lot in Black/contrast perception. Attached photos shows before and after the black cardboard posting on the front wall.
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post #33 of 56 Old 06-28-2014, 11:10 AM
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I insulated and covered over a basement window.....then hung a poster over that. No other windows. I'm lucky I know where the light switch is lol

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post #34 of 56 Old 06-28-2014, 11:40 AM
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My dedicated theater room (w/front projector) is pitch black at all times.

The room is painted with Rosco black velour and carpeted with a fairly flat black. I use Protostar adhesive material along the adjacent walls near the side edges of my screen to further help soak out reflection.

To block out my window, I bought some very large 1 1/2" thick foam board from Lowes piecing it together to form a single piece to cover my window while blanketing it in Duvetyne cloth. It fits almost perfectly and can easily be removed if needed.
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post #35 of 56 Old 06-29-2014, 02:51 AM
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My HT has total light control. Dedicated room is double walled with double doors and double windows. The inner parts doing the light control.
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post #36 of 56 Old 06-29-2014, 02:57 PM
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I have an open floor plan with windows every where. To help stop the light I used 10 foot copper pipe cut and joined to form long curtain rod's. This allowed me to section off the living room with black out curtains while letting light flow to the rest of the home. These are the ones I used:

http://www.overstock.com/Home-Garden...FQ&searchidx=4

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post #37 of 56 Old 06-29-2014, 08:56 PM
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How Well Can You Control Ambient Daylight In Your Home Theater?

I have total control, but it comes at the price of not being able to use the window at all. I hung black out curtains in the window over the blinds and then completely covers the whole area with 4" thick acoustic panels.

However, light reflected from the screen is another matter as my wife, will not allow me to turn the room into the cave that it should be.

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post #38 of 56 Old 06-30-2014, 03:14 AM
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Scott Wilkinson View Post


As you probably know, controlling ambient light is one of the most critical factors in creating a high-quality home-theater experience. The darker you can make the room, the more you will be drawn into the story on the screen. Also, a dark room prevents any distracting reflections from a flat-panel TV with a shiny screen. And a front-projection system absolutely requires a dark room to look good unless you have an ambient light-rejecting screen, and even then, a dark room is generally better.

Of course, any room can be made dark at night simply by turning off the lights. But if you watch during the day in a room with windows, sliding glass doors, skylights, or other transparent/translucent openings to the outside world, you need black-out shades or other coverings to darken the room, which might or might not be practical for one reason or another.

I'm curious to know if this is a problem for you. How well can you control the ambient daylight in the room you use as a home theater? I'd also love to know how you control ambient daylight. Blackout shades? A windowless room? If you have a front projector, do you use an ambient-light-rejecting screen?

If you haven't participated in our previous home-theater system polls, I encourage you to do so:

What is your main video display?
What AV electronics do you use?
What is your main speaker configuration?
What source devices do you use in your main HT?
Where do you get your movies?
How many separate subwoofers in your main home theater?
Where do you place your subwoofer(s)
What device(s) do you use to stream video?
What is your next home-theater purchase?

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What is your main video display?
Epson LCD projector
What AV electronics do you use?
Yamaha receiver RX-A3030
What is your main speaker configuration?
VAF research DC-X series
What source devices do you use in your main HT?
Panasonic Bluray 330
Where do you get your movies?
Various places
How many separate subwoofers in your main home theater?
Two
Where do you place your subwoofer(s)
Front and rear
What device(s) do you use to stream video?
Apple TV
What is your next home-theater purchase
A new projector
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post #39 of 56 Old 06-30-2014, 02:11 PM
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Jedirun View Post
I have total control, but it comes at the price of not being able to use the window at all. I hung black out curtains in the window over the blinds and then completely covers the whole area with 4" thick acoustic panels.

However, light reflected from the screen is another matter as my wife, will not allow me to turn the room into the cave that it should be.

Yeah, you do have pretty "challenging" conditions for a projector there, with all that bright decor.

If you want any hope of getting the contrast your projector is capable of, you need to either get a specialty screen - e.g. a Black Diamond screen, or Stewart Firehawk, or a cheaper Graywolf screen, which are made to preserve contrast when you have brighter walls and ceilings.

Or...and I always give this recommendation because it works so well, if you can just have curtains to the side of the screen - run the curtain track along the two side walls. Then you can have dark, non-reflective curtains stacked discretely in the room corners to the sides of the screen, and then pull them out along the walls (say, 6 feet or so) to cut side wall reflections. It works amazing in my set up.
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post #40 of 56 Old 07-01-2014, 03:21 PM
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Have I stumbled into a nest of vampires? I have 5 double windows in my viewing room, which are always open to the outside. Lots of light coming in and air passing through. There are drapes, but in the 20 years I've lived here, they've never been closed even once. My TV is just another window to the world.

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post #41 of 56 Old 07-02-2014, 02:58 PM
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+1 on the curtains for the walls.

I have white walls, white ceiling, big windows, open to other areas, so not ideal for projection.

With curtains I can have a nice bright room during the day or a blacked out man cave. Also masked the screen wall and ceiling above screen. Thick blackout curtains (removable) for the windows, but rarely use them since most of my viewing is at night.

 
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post #42 of 56 Old 07-02-2014, 05:34 PM
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I said partial control and as someone who did not want a Bat Cave Threater, I kept two large recessed windows, white double doors and crown/base molding in the room. The walls and ceiling were originally beige but I painted them a moca color once I went with multi-row HT seating.

My solution for light control with the windows is two custom 2" acoustic panels that fit inside the window wells. When not in use, they are side wall absorbers (see photos). I'm happy with this compromise and can achieve good if not great light control in the room. The doors and crown molding are the only issue now and I like the look of the room as they are (white). Having an audio priority system, the projected image looks very good to me and the fix (some paint) is any easy one should I every change my mind.

The windows:

The window panels on the wall:

Off the wall

In the window well (velcro)


The heavy curtains work well in moderate light conditions.
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post #43 of 56 Old 07-15-2014, 02:54 PM
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I literally framed over my one picture window in order to support symmetrical sound treatment with the other side wall.
I did this back in 1988, when I was using a Kloss Novabeam that had about, oh, maybe 20 lumens.

Today I use an Infocus SP777, which is plenty bright, and meets the specs for commercial theaters at the size I use.

I say that the MOST CRITICAL factor in producing a deep, 3D image, is light control. Every projector or big screen or even computer monitor has twice the subjective image quality when there is no stray light on the screen.

And I mean NONE. You also need to absorb the light coming *from* the screen on any surface within your field of vision at your seating area, lest it bounce back or distract you from 'immersion'.

I have dark burgundy carpet and curtains on all walls. The first five feet of the ceiling is covered in a midnight blue fabric that has black threads oriented so they won't reflect the light from the front. This made a huge difference over even dark ceiling paint, which will reflect low incidence angle light like any flat surface. You have to scatter the light as well as absorb it. It's no different from sound treatment, really.

You need to turn all the lights and projector/screen off, but leave all the gear on so you can see telltale LED illumination, and chase down every photon until your screen is absolutely uniform and barely perceptible floating in black space.

Now turn the projector/screen on, and you will think you upgraded way out of your original price range. Fabric is cheaper than electronics.
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post #44 of 56 Old 07-15-2014, 03:14 PM
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Rolled my own

I built my own room darkening shades for two windows. one 48"x48" and one 144"x24". I had an online shade company (The shade Store) ship the fabric installed on 1.5" O.D. aluminum tubes made for this purpose. This was done to guarantee proper alignment of the fabric to the roller. Shipping was the biggest expense in the 12 foot long shade. I used motors from Rollertrol; 6 lb lift, 12 volt DC. The motors came with the needed end brackets and were trivial to slip into the tubes. Did the finish woodworking myself. The motors are controlled by a TCP based relay board with 8 relays of which I use 4; 2 for each shade. The wiring does dynamic braking, stopping the motors very quickly.


The long shade is a bit noisy due to its length, the shorter one is barely audible. There is a toggle switch near each window for manual control. If I had to do it over I would make the long shade into three (2', 8', 2') and I would place the fabric on the tubing myself.. Was not inexpensive, but I got exactly what I wanted with no compromise. My hobby is building things!


When the theater starts, the room lights dim with the shades lowering.
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post #45 of 56 Old 07-15-2014, 04:10 PM
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I am really glad you asked. I had been meaning to share my budget-concious work in this regard.

I was particularly challenged because I wanted to use my loft as my HT. Other than blackout curtains, the main thing that helped my out were flexible curtain tracks from curtain-tracks.com. I also used curtain tracks on the windows since they sit closer to the wall they block a lot more light.

Some pics:

DSCF6377 by xnappo, on Flickr
DSCF6376 by xnappo, on Flickr
DSCF6381 by xnappo, on Flickr
DSCF6383 by xnappo, on Flickr
DSCF6386 by xnappo, on Flickr
DSCF6384 by xnappo, on Flickr

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post #46 of 56 Old 07-16-2014, 05:24 AM
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4x4 large picture window front and center, and one directly through a door in to the office behind right of the couches...

Bright!


Door closed!


Screen down!


...and now you're tripping over the coffee table at 2pm in the afternoon unless a bright scene is on the screen or lights are on.

--billyM
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post #47 of 56 Old 07-16-2014, 12:50 PM
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I don't watch all that many movies, my 70" LCD is more for sports and TV. I rarely turn off all the lights let alone worry about ambient light. I don't really care for sitting in a total blackout. I have not been to a movie theater in years, have a free pass from my last blood donation but have not even looked to see what's showing. How can you refill your wine glass in total darkness?
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post #48 of 56 Old 07-16-2014, 01:14 PM
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Many years ago, a friend of a friend showed me his home theater. He had installed Lutron blackout shades, which had metal channels on the sides that the shade ran in. But, even with those channels he pointed out how there was a little bit of light leakage at the bottom, and a little bit at the top of the rails, and that that little bit of leakage just wiped out his contrast on the projection screen. As a result, he had installed drapes in front of the windows, and the two combined gave him the perfect blackout that he wanted.

When I built my theater, I was determined to achieve total blackout. Fortunately, because we were re-casing the window and the patio door as part of the framework for the false fabric walls that hide all of the acoustical treatment, I was able to have the carpenters build the Lutron tracks into the window casings, and they built the motor into the space above the window. This allows the rails to run up into the area above the window, which means that any light leakage up there just leaks into that cavity, and doesn't make it into the room. At the bottom, we milled a 1" deep groove in the sills, so that the weighted hem bar drops into the groove. A little light leaks under the hem bar, but it's "swallowed" in the groove and does not affect the room.

I can go down there at the brightest part of the day, and if the room lights are off it is extraordinarily dark. So dark that my eyes eventually dark adapt to be able to see the very faint light cast onto the screen by the (very dim!) Lutron keypad at the back of the room. Even that will be almost totally eliminated when I get my final keypad faceplate.

Here are a couple of quick photos. Sorry for how dirty the window is!

In the second to last image, you can see how a small amount of leakage happens up by the roller, but is entirely confined within the casing of the window. In the last image you can see how the hem bar sits down in the groove. Because it's touching, there's a slight wrinkle in the material, but if I step it up one blip on the motor, it leaves a small gap, so I don't mind the wrinkle in exchange for a better seal.

PS: Is there some way to inline uploaded images instead of using the thumbnail/browser thing?
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post #49 of 56 Old 07-16-2014, 02:50 PM
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Our dedicated theater room used to be an upstairs living room that has always been the preference for watching movies. It does have a couple windows that we had to contend with but living in the south in the middle of Hurricane Alley we invested in some extreme rollguard shutter protection from LAS. These shutters are currently on a manual crank to roll, but we can motorize and automate them if we want. Currently we leave them down all the time as they kill all ambient light and leave the windows/house protected as if there was no window at all. So to answer your other questions we don't have an ambient light blocking screen as we don't need one.
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post #50 of 56 Old 07-16-2014, 03:00 PM
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Quote:
Originally Posted by jjperrone View Post
Our dedicated theater room used to be an upstairs living room that has always been the preference for watching movies. It does have a couple windows that we had to contend with but living in the south in the middle of Hurricane Alley we invested in some extreme rollguard shutter protection from LAS. These shutters are currently on a manual crank to roll, but we can motorize and automate them if we want. Currently we leave them down all the time as they kill all ambient light and leave the windows/house protected as if there was no window at all. So to answer your other questions we don't have an ambient light blocking screen as we don't need one.
jjperrone: Do those shutters block 100% of the light? I've been considering something like that for some of my other rooms to provide light control without having to have interior window coverings. Thanks!

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post #51 of 56 Old 07-16-2014, 03:18 PM
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Quote:
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jjperrone: Do those shutters block 100% of the light? I've been considering something like that for some of my other rooms to provide light control without having to have interior window coverings. Thanks!
They block about 90% of the light, but at the brightest parts of the day there is some light that makes it past the shutters, but not much. We do have additional window dressing on the inside of those windows, but it is very lite dressing. I will try to take pictures and upload them so you can see the results. Either way we needed the shutters because of the protection they offer, and our business requires us to be as close to work as possible in the event of an evacuation.
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post #52 of 56 Old 07-16-2014, 03:19 PM
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Thanks, pictures would be great. Do you think they block enough light for somebody who might want to sleep in the room when it's light out?

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post #53 of 56 Old 07-16-2014, 05:31 PM
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Reflective light is a serious problem for me even with light blocking roman shades. Last year I attempted to upgrade from my 52" XBR4 with matted screen. I finally gave up because all manufacturers have seen fit to go with a glossy screen to increase contrast, make blacks blacker, I'm not sure what. Yes, serious problem, and offset viewing is also pathetic on most non-plasma televisions. Quite honestly, I don't know what I'm going to do.
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post #54 of 56 Old 07-18-2014, 06:54 AM
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The room my HT setup is in is bright during the day but if I want to make it dark I just pull the blinds and although that method don't make it completely dark it does the job. At night I usually have one lamp on but when I want it dark I just turn it off.
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post #55 of 56 Old 07-19-2014, 12:40 PM
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Control of Ambient Light

It's quite enjoyable seeing what others have done in dealing with this problem. I am fortunate that I have a large family room (15' by 21') that is partially below grade with short windows. I have relatively short windows in which the back ones are covered by a projection screen (96" by 64"). I actually covered these windows with sheet rock so no light comes through behind the screen. There are windows on one side only and my wife, who really got into the swing of things made curtains that are, thick and dark green that keeps out the light. There are doors to all entrances that can be closed. In fact the whole room is almost completely dark during the day for projection movie viewing.

The walls are painted dark green, the same color as the ceiling and my wife also made dark green curtains for each side of the projection scree, that can be partially closed for older movies that are not wide screen. The floor has a dark green carpet and I have black leather sofas.

Unfortunately the sofas are very comfortable and with the dark it is conducive to dozing off if the movie is not too exciting (just like sitting in the planetarium).

John
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post #56 of 56 Old 07-19-2014, 12:54 PM
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Otium View Post
My HT has total light control. Dedicated room is double walled with double doors and double windows. The inner parts doing the light control.
Yours is intriguing.
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