Does Your ISP Throttle Your Bandwidth? - Page 2 - AVS Forum

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View Poll Results: Does Your ISP Throttle Your Bandwidth?
Yes, when I exceed the limit from any content provider 16 5.33%
Yes, when I exceed the limit from a content provider other than my ISP 6 2.00%
No, but I'm charged more when I exceed the limit 33 11.00%
No, I can send and receive an unlimited amount of data 167 55.67%
Don't know 78 26.00%
Voters: 300. You may not vote on this poll
Community News & Polls

barrelbelly's Avatar barrelbelly
12:34 PM Liked: 236
post #31 of 88
07-18-2014 | Posts: 1,735
Joined: Nov 2007
I want the Chattanooga Electric Public Utility package so bad in my area. It's the fastest system. It's the cheapest system. It's the best system. And right now it's the most at risk in court system. By the same corrupt political, court and business lobby stooges. Who have taken dead aim at it. To kill it's potential in the rest of the USA. It has no bandwidth caps at all. And it is lightening fast. Yet it costs Chattanooga citizens 50% less than the inferior, gimped private sector ISPs. Who are lobbying mightily for the right, privilege and entitlement to screw the public into submission. I'm not even sure whether this debate (throttling) is the one we should be addressing. The question should be why does it even exist. If public utilities can deliver a superior service, cheaper. And without all of the corruption, greed and graft. Internet access has become so widespread and necessary...that a whole new conversation needs to be addressed relative to public access and acceptable business practices governing its use. JMHO.
Boxozaxu's Avatar Boxozaxu
12:55 PM Liked: 91
post #32 of 88
07-18-2014 | Posts: 386
Joined: Oct 2013
Quote:
Originally Posted by echtogammut View Post
They are selling someone a bandwidth rate, 50MB/s, that, if fully utilized, would only last 17 hours before it hit the cap.
Data caps and speed don't jive at all. Tells you advertised speed is just another marketing gimmick.

Cox's 100 Mpbs plan equates to 42 GB per hour. I would hit the monthly cap in under 10 hours if there was a scenario where I could use/need that speed. Most people don't realize they don't come anywhere near using the speeds they buy.

I like Cox otherwise. My netflix experience with them is superb and I've gone ahead and cut cable and I enjoy local HD programmiong over the air. But now I've started reducing the quality of Netflix just to stay under my data cap. I really don't know how they can expect people to adhere to such low data caps especially when 4k streaming becomes the norm.
inuk_qallunaaq's Avatar inuk_qallunaaq
01:30 PM Liked: 10
post #33 of 88
07-18-2014 | Posts: 85
Joined: Jun 2007
Man, I wish I had half of all the posted speeds and caps from this thread.

Mine are 1.5Mbps, 10GB cap and for $80/mth !! The cost of living up in the Arctic I suppose...
2Georges's Avatar 2Georges
01:33 PM Liked: 12
post #34 of 88
07-18-2014 | Posts: 22
Joined: Jun 2014
I have Verizon DSL, so no caps here as far as I know.

I'm on the highest tier speed they offer, and am guaranteed between 10 and 15 meg down (routinely get somewhere over 11 at the modem), which isn't very fast compared to some cable or fiber speeds, but it's good enough for what we use it for. The only streaming my wife and I do is through Amazon Prime Instant Video, or Youtube, and we don't seem to have any problems with that. I've read a lot about how Verizon throttles Netflix, which is one of the reasons we never signed up with them, but that slowdown doesn't seem to cross over to Amazon (maybe because there's a lot less traffic going through them that they stay under the radar?).

Even though I'm happy enough with my service, I'd love it for Fios or Google Fiber to come to my area. As far as I know, there is fiber already laid in our town, it's just that there's no one taking advantage of it. One of the local internet companies has started toying with offering fiber internet service, but last I checked it was only available to select businesses in the area, although they didn't discount branching over into home use at some point in the future, so fingers crossed there.
Loststorm's Avatar Loststorm
02:02 PM Liked: 10
post #35 of 88
07-18-2014 | Posts: 44
Joined: Mar 2008
No caps(for now back off Comcast)

ISP: Time Warner Cable
Internet: Extreme 200/20
krismate's Avatar krismate
02:32 PM Liked: 16
post #36 of 88
07-18-2014 | Posts: 24
Joined: Dec 2013
Quote:
Originally Posted by inuk_qallunaaq View Post
Man, I wish I had half of all the posted speeds and caps from this thread.

Mine are 1.5Mbps, 10GB cap and for $80/mth !! The cost of living up in the Arctic I suppose...

Hehe, welcome to Canada!

I have a 5down/1up (max upload I've ever been able to achieve is about half that) connection but a 50GB per month cap. Also higher latency for the past few months and no one seems bothered to do anything about it.
CinemaAndy's Avatar CinemaAndy
02:52 PM Liked: 77
post #37 of 88
07-18-2014 | Posts: 552
Joined: May 2014
I think some focus should be made on the fact that limits were established by the FCC and enforced by local ISP's, Phone, Cable and Satellite companies. Adding internet to existing infrastructure that was already over stretched made matters worse. The caps were in place as a reminder to watch your monthly usage and not go over your allocated usage.

With the recent trend of declining cable use for video transmission, that opens up more broadband capacity, and the fact that communication CEO's understand broadband delivery of content is the future, a lot of ISP's have chosen to remove or ignore limits.

I use Xfinity business at my office, and 50Mbs at home. My business account regularly reaches 13TB a month, and at home from 800 to 1.2TB. And i have never been contacted about high usage.

Under my home monthly usage meter,

Note: Enforcement of the 250GB data consumption threshold is currently suspended.
myriadcorp's Avatar myriadcorp
03:01 PM Liked: 27
post #38 of 88
07-18-2014 | Posts: 168
Joined: Oct 2006
Should be an option for my ISP throttles bandwidth at random to websites they secretly want to limit traffic from. I had AT&T put my connection down to a dial up speed from 24Mbps when trying to download a patch from the game Eve Online. I had to use a VPN to download the patch update. They throttle stuff without people knowing.
mogrub's Avatar mogrub
04:24 PM Liked: 129
post #39 of 88
07-18-2014 | Posts: 572
Joined: Feb 2007
Just another datapoint on ATT Uverse, which we use as our ISP and home phone (don't use their TV service). After +/- 5 years, we've never had an over charge for data usage. For comparison purposes we consistently get just over 20 Mbps in download speed. Zero streaming problems so far.

That'll be the kiss of death, and it'll probably flatline tonight, but up until now, rock solid -- except for the one time a squirrel nibbled through the service line where it enters the yard. They were out the next day and had it fixed in 10 minutes.

I gotta give 'em their due, it's been good service.
HDShatter's Avatar HDShatter
08:40 PM Liked: 10
post #40 of 88
07-18-2014 | Posts: 16
Joined: Dec 2012
I have a soft cap with no throttling, I have gone over it every month and they never do anything.
WHATTHEDILEO's Avatar WHATTHEDILEO
09:00 PM Liked: 27
post #41 of 88
07-18-2014 | Posts: 118
Joined: Dec 2004
I have a verified 58Mbps (OOKLA-tested a dozen times on different days) from Comcast, yet NetFlix was coming in at 0.4Mbps, and it was buffering low-res SD for cartoons - unwatchable data rate!!! Until the very day that Netflix announced that they had made an agreement with Comcast - now I get Super-HD all day long. No issues.

I understand that Comcast is a business, and is looking out for their self-interests. But I wish they didn't let their cable business influence their internet business in a way that does not benefit the consumer.
WHATTHEDILEO's Avatar WHATTHEDILEO
09:01 PM Liked: 27
post #42 of 88
07-18-2014 | Posts: 118
Joined: Dec 2004
So I guess I don't have a throttling cap, just a discriminatory ISP in Comcast.

ADDENDUM: Also during this time of withholding, Crackle (which is absolutely FREE) was streaming at 15-18Mbps! A far cry from 0.4Mbps.
GregLee's Avatar GregLee
09:17 PM Liked: 78
post #43 of 88
07-18-2014 | Posts: 3,250
Joined: Jul 2002
Don't know. When I first subscribed to DSL from my local phone company, my contract said there was a cap, but I've never noticed one being enforced. I don't download all that much.
Ovation's Avatar Ovation
09:59 PM Liked: 28
post #44 of 88
07-18-2014 | Posts: 3,270
Joined: Mar 2004
Last year I switched from a 60GB/month cap to unlimited (15Mbps up/10 down--speed is consistent using the speed test app across all my devices). I wanted to up the PQ on Netflix and not worry about downloading (to own) TV series or movies from iTunes. Routinely, my monthly usage is around 100GB/month since I made the switch. Only downside (and not one that affects my usage in any way) is the speed limit. My ISP offers much higher speeds, but they are not (as yet) with unlimited data. I don't need the speed, so I prefer unlimited.
skriefal's Avatar skriefal
10:30 PM Liked: 38
post #45 of 88
07-18-2014 | Posts: 951
Joined: Jan 2000
Quote:
Originally Posted by myriadcorp View Post
Should be an option for my ISP throttles bandwidth at random to websites they secretly want to limit traffic from. I had AT&T put my connection down to a dial up speed from 24Mbps when trying to download a patch from the game Eve Online. I had to use a VPN to download the patch update. They throttle stuff without people knowing.
You can't know that your ISP was throttling anything. Things aren't that simple. It's much more likely that the server was doing the throttling, or that there was no deliberate throttling but instead a routing issue outside your ISP's local network. Everyone wants to blame their ISP when speeds are slow -- and sometimes that blame is warranted. But sometimes it isn't.
markrubin's Avatar markrubin
04:07 AM Liked: 480
post #46 of 88
07-19-2014 | Posts: 23,099
Joined: May 2001
I have Comcast Blast and have download speeds of about 110 Mbps/ up about 11-12 Mbps: I run the speed test every few days and consistently get these results so no throttling here that I can see

My internet usage is running 800-1110 GB per month and Comcast adds a note:

Note:enforcement of the 250GB data consumption threshold is currently suspended

Now I am trying to figure out the largest users of the data from sources in my home which include:

Marantz NA7004 NAS tuned to Pandora 24/7
Pelco surveillance DVR used to monitor off site business 24/7
Kaleidescape Cinema One system (occasional download of HD movie)

according to Fing, I have 73 wired and wireless devices connected to Ethernet including Nest thermostats and smokes, RTI remote control devices and iPads, etc but I assume the small device data use is minimal

I did look into Comcast Business Class which also gives me a fixed IP address: that would be my next move if they start to charge me for high usage.
Sibuna's Avatar Sibuna
05:16 AM Liked: 329
post #47 of 88
07-19-2014 | Posts: 2,233
Joined: Apr 2010
i have TWC and in my area there are no caps or throttling that i have noticed, its not stated if there are and ive used close to a TB in a month many times and never had an issues. Fastest plan in my area is 25/2

TWC does throttle and cap in some markets however
BiggAW's Avatar BiggAW
09:13 AM Liked: 57
post #48 of 88
07-19-2014 | Posts: 1,328
Joined: Feb 2004
I have Comcast. Our cap is "suspended". A couple of months I have topped 1500GB. One month I went over 3000GB. No issues.
aufVidyZen's Avatar aufVidyZen
11:24 AM Liked: 17
post #49 of 88
07-19-2014 | Posts: 93
Joined: Sep 2004
Quote:
Originally Posted by robnix View Post
I switched to Comcast Business a few years back. No caps, better support, and faster speeds for a small premium.
Comcast keep sending me mailings advertising this service. The fine print says "not eligible for home based businesses". Which I take to mean they won't activate it in residential areas.

Is this something they do in some markets but not others?
aufVidyZen's Avatar aufVidyZen
11:56 AM Liked: 17
post #50 of 88
07-19-2014 | Posts: 93
Joined: Sep 2004
Quote:
Originally Posted by skriefal View Post
You can't know that your ISP was throttling anything. Things aren't that simple. It's much more likely that the server was doing the throttling, or that there was no deliberate throttling but instead a routing issue outside your ISP's local network. Everyone wants to blame their ISP when speeds are slow -- and sometimes that blame is warranted. But sometimes it isn't.
Yes and no. Cisco Multimode VDSL2 and ADSL2/2+ Enhanced High-Speed WAN Interface Cards (VDSL2 and ADSL2/2+ EHWIC) for example support up to 64 classes of network traffic, with separate flow control policies. For each port on the DSLAM they can set up different QoS for different types of traffic: one for multicast video, another for ftp, smtp, etc. that apply to ingress or egress ports on the routers (upstream and downstream).

When a network segment gets congested these policies get triggered to limit the different classes of traffic. So an ISP can write a policy that throttles packets from Netflix servers, or go after ftp (file transfer) traffic. Since the original poster saw his speed return when he switched to a VPN, what happened is the ftp traffic was inside a VPN tunnel and thus the VPN QoS policy was applied.

As more networks switch to IMS and the Evolved Packet Core we can expect to see individual user by user QoS policies that will be kept in the Policy and Charging Rules Function (PCRF) server.
morbidcorpse's Avatar morbidcorpse
12:22 PM Liked: 63
post #51 of 88
07-19-2014 | Posts: 214
Joined: Mar 2013
My current ISP (Comcast) caps data usage at 250GB, but is currently not enforcing the cap in my area. However, when I had AT&T DSL service, they capped usage at, I think, 110GB and the definitely WOULD charge you if you went over the cap.
TorTorden's Avatar TorTorden
02:09 PM Liked: 82
post #52 of 88
07-19-2014 | Posts: 246
Joined: Feb 2013
In Norway no cap is pretty much the norm since the mid 90's.
But coverage can still vary widely, sure I am personally fortunate enough to have optical fiber at about 80 Mb/s up and down (they just upped our speed) for about 120$ monthly (this includes our voip phone service, and tv feed)

But that's right here, if you happen to live on a street or area that somehow wasn't on the development list you are screwed, and either doomed to dial up or a mobile data subscription if you surpass 2gb on those it gets expensive real quick (if you can get connection at all) you can forget about streaming video and especially HD.
skriefal's Avatar skriefal
02:53 PM Liked: 38
post #53 of 88
07-19-2014 | Posts: 951
Joined: Jan 2000
Quote:
Originally Posted by aufVidyZen View Post
Yes and no. Cisco Multimode VDSL2 and ADSL2/2+ Enhanced High-Speed WAN Interface Cards (VDSL2 and ADSL2/2+ EHWIC) for example support up to 64 classes of network traffic, with separate flow control policies. For each port on the DSLAM they can set up different QoS for different types of traffic: one for multicast video, another for ftp, smtp, etc. that apply to ingress or egress ports on the routers (upstream and downstream).
Certainly an ISP can throttle or filter traffic based on type, destination, etc. That doesn't prove that they are doing so in any specific scenario. The Internet is a large place and traffic passes across links operated by multiple parties; performance can be degraded in many ways. It's fashionable to point the finger at the immediate provider (Comcast, Centurylink, ...), based on possibly-justified hatred from prior experiences with those companies. But it's not always their fault.

Bandwidth limits are different. Those are the ISP's "fault".
aufVidyZen's Avatar aufVidyZen
06:12 PM Liked: 17
post #54 of 88
07-19-2014 | Posts: 93
Joined: Sep 2004
Quote:
Originally Posted by skriefal View Post
Certainly an ISP can throttle or filter traffic based on type, destination, etc. That doesn't prove that they are doing so in any specific scenario. The Internet is a large place and traffic passes across links operated by multiple parties; performance can be degraded in many ways. It's fashionable to point the finger at the immediate provider (Comcast, Centurylink, ...), based on possibly-justified hatred from prior experiences with those companies. But it's not always their fault.

Bandwidth limits are different. Those are the ISP's "fault".
We are in "violent agreement" on this. I am a network engineer that works on broadband networks as an architect, and targeting individuals was never part of the system design. Until NGN ("next generation networks") there is no way to actually do it. There are just policies on assigning QoS (quality of service) on different types of traffic to make networks function as best they can until congestion kills everything. As you say.

The thing ISP's are guilty of is "overbooking". This means selling 6Mbps to thousands of subscribers when your network can only support hundreds. That's how broadband networks generate 95% profit margins for AT&T, Comcast, and Verizon. They got away with it until people tried to start using 6Mbps for Netflix, etc. This is a "Come to Jesus moment", and the FCC is trying to hide under a rock.

For cable networks that use HFC (hybrid fiber coax); which is almost every MSO cable company in the US, there are are fixed number of "frequency slots" on the cable network. You can use them for broadband service or you can allocate them to a 24/7 channel that two people are watching but the content providers pony up a chunk of change for. It's "double dipping".

Comcast do not have to roll a single truck, hire a single field technician, to double, triple, quadruple their broadband capacity overnight. Just switch over a couple of shopping channels to broadband capacity. Comcast lobbyists are throwing up a huge amount of FUD to the FCC in the Comcast/T-W acquisition about how they are "struggling" to provide future bandwidth, but it's total BS. It won't cost them a dime, in the end.
carageuw's Avatar carageuw
06:49 PM Liked: 12
post #55 of 88
07-19-2014 | Posts: 409
Joined: Aug 2010
My Uverse Max Turbo (24 down, 3 up) apparently had some beef with BT. Everything will slow to a crawl after running uTorrent for more than an hour or so, and I would have to power-cycle the VDSL Gateway to fix the connection. However, I never ran into this problem again once I turned on packet encryption in uTorrent. It has been fine for months now.
Marc Wielage's Avatar Marc Wielage
07:27 PM Liked: 125
post #56 of 88
07-19-2014 | Posts: 458
Joined: Jul 2000
We used to get throttled by the evil Crime-Warner Cable here in LA, but since they bounced to 320Mbps download last week (and 20Mbps up), I haven't noticed any throttling anymore. I haven't checked to see what they've done with the data caps.

What I have noticed is that speed is still heavily limited by the source. Amazon, Apple, and Netflix all have the massive throughput to handle a truly high-speed connection, but regular everyday websites (like this one) still get very pokey. So not everything becomes faster on the net, just because you have a hugely-fast fiber connection. A lot depends on the site at the other end of the wire.
sage11x's Avatar sage11x
08:21 PM Liked: 566
post #57 of 88
07-19-2014 | Posts: 2,544
Joined: Dec 2006
Calling shenanigans on the poll results.
tenthplanet's Avatar tenthplanet
11:33 PM Liked: 182
post #58 of 88
07-19-2014 | Posts: 1,514
Joined: Feb 2006
Quote:
Originally Posted by mogrub View Post
Just another datapoint on ATT Uverse, which we use as our ISP and home phone (don't use their TV service). After +/- 5 years, we've never had an over charge for data usage. For comparison purposes we consistently get just over 20 Mbps in download speed. Zero streaming problems so far.

That'll be the kiss of death, and it'll probably flatline tonight, but up until now, rock solid -- except for the one time a squirrel nibbled through the service line where it enters the yard. They were out the next day and had it fixed in 10 minutes.

I gotta give 'em their due, it's been good service.
Same here no real problems with Uverse. And according to stories I've heard squirrels have an affinity for cables from time to time.
mogrub's Avatar mogrub
12:09 AM Liked: 129
post #59 of 88
07-20-2014 | Posts: 572
Joined: Feb 2007
Yup. Any cable that matters = squirrel floss. I'm trying, without much success, to be pleased at their collective commitment to good dental hygiene.
thrang's Avatar thrang
07:10 AM Liked: 172
post #60 of 88
07-20-2014 | Posts: 4,219
Joined: Jun 2005
I don't even know what my usage is, or how I can ascertain these numbers (Optimum Online)

But I've never experienced any artificial slowdowns (Ultra 101 services)
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