HT of the Month: The Hahn Theater - AVS Forum | Home Theater Discussions And Reviews
Forum Jump: 
 161Likes
Reply
 
Thread Tools
post #1 of 187 Old 08-10-2016, 04:12 PM - Thread Starter
AVS Forum Special Member
 
Scott Wilkinson's Avatar
 
Join Date: Sep 2001
Location: Burbank, CA
Posts: 2,964
Mentioned: 62 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 1620 Post(s)
Liked: 4372
HT of the Month: The Hahn Theater

As a retired cinematographer, Rob Hahn knows a good-looking image when he sees one. So it's no surprise that he wanted a superlative home theater. "I've always dreamed of building a proper home theater, but it's only just now that the technology is good enough to do it right." Also, he was frustrated whenever he went out to the movies. "I got tired of seeing films out of focus with dim lamps and painfully loud sound levels.

"Another motivation was to build a theater that would properly showcase films in the manner they were meant to be seen. I can't tell you how many times I've had this conversation—I ask, 'Have you ever seen 2001?" And the reply is something like, 'Yeah, I saw it last year on my iPad.' It's been a revelation for the people we've had over to see films like West Side Story on a 19-foot screen. They all say, 'I guess I never really saw it until tonight!'"


Rob's guests enter the huge theater from one of two airlocks in the rear.

Of course, to "do it right" also requires a lot of research and planning. Rob joined AVS Forum in 2004, but he went much farther than studying build threads. "In 2008, I traveled to Detroit and Houston to visit other AVS members to see their theaters. I wanted to pick their brains about the experiences they had in design and construction."

The next step was assembling the right team to turn his dream into reality. "In 2012, I hired Keith Yates Design (KYD) to design the theater—including all the acoustic treatments, speakers, and HVAC—and Geoff Franklin of The Projection Room to do all the video, including the screen, projector, wiring, and Crestron control system. We used SketchUp and GoToMeeting during the design phase, since Keith's company is on the West Coast and I'm on the East Coast. I could ask them to zoom into a specific area and make adjustments right then and there. Then they'd upload the latest design in SketchUp and I could walk through the theater; it was amazing and extremely helpful. It took about a year of design before we broke ground and started construction, but the design process continued throughout the construction phase."


Rob's theater started life with basic framing. The pitched roof would become an attic space for HVAC conduit, cabling, etc.

In this case, "breaking ground" is no understatement—the plan called for tearing down half the house and building the theater from scratch. "The actual construction was done by Davenport Contracting out of Stamford, CT. We needed a contractor who wasn't afraid to ask questions and would be incessantly curious about solving the many issues that were sure to come up during building. They also had to work very closely with Keith Yates and Geoff Franklin, and that relationship had to be very honest. No shortcuts could be taken if we wanted the final product to perform as designed."


Looking toward the front of the theater as the plywood walls are being installed over the framing and insulation, you can see how enormous it is.

That design was very specific. "I wanted a theater that presented movies as an all-encompassing experience without having to build a bat cave. A completely black room can feel oppressive, so we built a hybrid. The back half of the room has warm wood, deep-brown carpet, and classic moldings, while the front half is black to maximize perceived contrast on the screen. In terms of shape, I hate shoebox theaters, so it was important that the room got wider as you got closer to the screen.

"Also, 4-way masking is extremely important to me. I wanted to be able to make 1.33 films larger than they would be in a constant-image-height [CIH] setup. You watch Close Encounters in 2.35 and Gone With the Wind in 1.33. In CIH theaters, to get the 1.33 aspect ratio, you would bring in the side masks, creating a smaller canvas. But with 4-way masking, I can move the top and bottom masks—as well as the sides—to create 1.33, but I end up with a larger canvas than I would have in a CIH configuration. I believe that Gone With the Wind was meant to have just as much impact as 2001, and the only way to achieve that is with 4-way masking.

"Another advantage of 4-way masking is that you can change the size of the screen depending on what kind of movie you're watching. In a commercial movie theater, you get to choose how close you want to be to the screen. But in a home theater, you don't have that flexibility. With 4-way masking, I can make the screen any size I want, based on the quality of the source material and the aspect ratio. For films that have huge vistas and slow-moving cameras, such as Lawrence of Arabia and 2001, I can watch on a 19' screen. For action films with a lot of hand-held work, such as the Bourne films, or titles with less-than-pristine picture quality, I can make the image smaller. Geoff Franklin and his calibrator, David Abrams, did a fantastic job installing the huge masking mechanism and Stewart screen material, calibrating the Sony VPL-VW5000ES projector, and coordinating the operation of the entire theater, including lighting, through the Crestron system."


KYD's acoustical engineers modeled and simulated the room's acoustic performance during the design phase, and when the construction got to a certain point, they measured the acoustics with high-resolution conventional microphones and a 3D mic to see how closely the actual space matched the computer model. If it didn't, they could tweak the space as needed.

The room's noise floor was another important consideration. "I wanted an intensely quiet room, and the design of the HVAC [heating, ventilation, and air conditioning] system was crucial in this regard. The goal was a noise rating of NCB 5 [which is quieter than a professional recording studio], and Keith's engineering team builds a 6 dB 'pad' into the calculations to offset field discrepancies, which means the results equated to NCB -1 [negative 1].

"We accomplished this partly by using very large supply ducting to minimize air-flow speed. Also, the slots in the air grills are large enough to allow for low-velocity discharge. We also employed low-velocity acoustic silencers for both supply and return. All HVAC fan-coil units are decoupled from the surface of the building using isolation hangers. The end result is that tiny sound details are rendered in the most delicate fashion because of the extremely low noise floor."

Of course, other forms of acoustic isolation and treatment were used as well. "Keith's plan called for very specific construction techniques in order to achieve the performance I wanted. The room is floating and decoupled from the building—it's actually a room within a room. The theater is over our garage, so the ceiling of the garage is isolated from the floor of the theater—we never hear the garage door opening while watching a film."


Another noise-reducing strategy was to build an entirely separate projection booth/equipment room, which is acoustically isolated from the main theater.

This floating-room approach has other advantages. "It allowed us to install all the speakers and acoustic treatments in the sides, rear, and ceiling of the theater behind acoustically transparent fabric. The fabric on the walls is installed on panels with moldings that are attached by magnets. To get behind the fabric to change a blown speaker or adjust the acoustic material, all I have to do is pull on a couple of tabs to remove the panels. It's an extremely flexible design, and since no nails are used, I never have to worry about messing up the stained wood when I need access."

The front LCR speakers—JBL's mighty M2s, no less—are mounted behind a 19-foot-wide, microperfed Stewart SnoMatte 100 acoustically transparent screen. Joining them are six KYD-designed UberSub infrasonic subwoofers, each comprised of dual 24" drivers facing each other in custom-machined housings; that's 12 drivers in all. As verified during four days of testing and system calibration, the UberSub system met its target of reproducing bass down to 5 Hz at 120-130 dB with less than 3% total harmonic distortion.


The front baffle wall includes spots for three JBL M2 speakers, each with an UberSub above and another below.


These 12 24" driver units are destined to be mounted in pairs above and below the front LCRs.


Two UberSub driver units are mounted facing each other in each of these custom, force-cancelling housings.

On the forward portions of the side walls are two JBL AC28/26 speakers on each side, serving as front-wide channels. The surround duties are performed by six JBL 8340As (two on each side and two in the rear), and 10 JBL SCS 8 speakers are mounted on the ceiling for Atmos overhead effects. Rounding out the speakers are eight KYD/JL Audio SHOC-24 subwoofers at the side and rear walls and two more 24" infrasonic subwoofers mounted under the center seat in the second and third rows. In terms of the number of speakers, the Atmos configuration is an amazing 13.16.10. Clearly, nothing but a Trinnov Altitude32 pre/pro would suffice to control such a monstrous Atmos system!


Here you can see the face of the 30-inch-deep front baffle wall, including three JBL M2s and a total of six UberSubs above and below the main speakers, all surrounded by acoustic foam.


Installing a screen this large is not trivial.

Because all the speakers are behind acoustically transparent fabric, Rob was able to implement a unique design element—he installed lights behind the fabric that allow visitors to see the speakers and acoustic treatments that would otherwise be invisible. "Being a cinematographer, I had fun lighting all the items behind the acoustically transparent screen and wall and ceiling fabrics. All automated aspects of the theater are controlled by a Crestron system, including the lighting. With one click, all the main recessed and sconce lighting slowly dims, while the lighting behind the screen and wall fabric slowly comes on, like a slow dissolve, showcasing all the stuff that's 'behind the curtain.' It's a really cool effect."


Under regular lighting, the screen looks completely normal.


With the lights on behind the acoustically transparent screen, you can see the speakers through the perforated material.


With normal illumination, the side looks like a solid wall.


The side walls are actually acoustically transparent fabric, behind which are the surround speakers and acoustic treatments, which you can see when the inner lights are on.


Likewise, the ceiling is acoustically transparent fabric, and the overhead Atmos speakers and acoustic treatments are visible when Rob's special lighting is on.

For seating, Rob chose the Palliser Vox recliner. "There are three rows of seats, five seats per row. We toyed with the idea of having only two rows, so that the money seats would have no seating in front of them, but ultimately I thought it would be better to have a front row, even if no one sat in them most times, to give the viewer some perspective—a feeling that they're in a real theater."


The seating includes three rows of five Palliser Vox recliners each.

After three years of construction, Rob's theater is finally complete. Clearly, he spared no expense to get exactly what he wanted. When I asked him about the total cost, his only reply was, "a lot!"


While the back of the room is done up in warm wood and brown tones, the front is black, maximizing perceived contrast when watching a movie.

Rob's greatest moment was also quite poignant. "Rick Koch, the head of Davenport Contracting, passed away from cancer two months ago. He was an extraordinary man and the main reason the theater came together so beautifully. He desperately wanted to see a movie in the finished theater, so everyone worked long hours to make that happen. At the end of April 2016, we watched Gravity with him and all the people who helped build the theater. He was so proud of what his company had done, and he was fascinated to see and hear how all the work they did translated to the incredible movie-watching event we were having. It was a profoundly moving experience that none of us will ever forget."

A moving movie-watching experience, indeed. Now, after all the hard work—and a bittersweet farewell to one of those who made it happen—Rob and his family and friends get to enjoy one of the most sophisticated home theaters I've ever come across.

For much more detail about how Rob's home theater came together, check out the build thread here.

Also, fellow AVS member Art Sonneborn, who owns one of the theaters Rob visited in 2008, recounts his visit to Rob's theater here.

If you'd like your home theater considered for Home Theater of the Month, PM me with the details and a link to your build thread if available.

EQUIPMENT LIST

Sources

Kaleidescape Strato movie server
Kaleidescape DV700 Disc Vaults (9)
Kaleidescape 3U movie servers (2)
Samsung UBD-K8500 UHD Blu-ray player
TiVo Bolt cable/OTA DVR & streaming receiver

AV Electronics

Trinnov Altitude32 preamp/processor
Mark Levinson No. 533H 3-channel power amp (1, HF drivers of M2s)
Mark Levinson 531H monoblock power amps (3, LF drivers of M2s)
JBL Synthesis SDA-8300 8-channel power amps (3, side & rear surrounds, overheads)
JBL Synthesis SDA-4600 4-channel power amp (1, front wides)
Keith Yates Design UA-12K (aka SpeakerPower SP2-12000) 2-channel power amps (4, powering the UberSubs)

Processors

Lumagen Radiance Pro
Lab.Gruppen/Lake LM 26 audio signal router/processor (5, mains and subs)
Lab.Gruppen/Lake LM 44 audio signal router/processor (6, surrounds)

Projector

Sony VPL-VW5000ES (no anamorphic lens)

Screen

Stewart Filmscreen SnoMatte 100 LS (19' W, 2.1:1 full aspect ratio, Director's Choice 4-way masking, microperfed acoustically transparent, 1.0 gain)

Speakers

JBL Pro M2 (3, LCR)
JBL Pro AC28/26 (2 left wide, 2 right wide)
JBL Pro 8340A (2 left side, 2 right side, 2 rear)
JBL Pro SCS 8 (10, ceiling)
Custom KYD/JL Audio SHOC-24 powered subwoofers (8, side & rear walls)
Custom KYD UberSub passive subwoofers (6 pairs of 24" modules behind screen, 2 single 24" drivers under center seat in rows 2 & 3)

Cables

Liberty ExtraFlex OFC 10/2 speaker cables with Canare/Neutrik termination
Corning Optical fiber-optic cables
Belden CAT5/6, RS232 cables

Control

Crestron

Power Conditioning

Extensive custom system

Seating

Palliser Vox (15 in three rows of five)

Room Dimensions

Actual room: 34' (L) x 28' (W) x 16' (H)
Apparent room (after baffle wall, fabric concealing speakers and acoustic treatments, isolated slab floor, and seating risers): 28.5' (L) x 26' (W) x 13' (H) at the front, 29' (L) x 24' (W) x 9.5' (H) at the back

Please do not click on the Quick Reply button at the bottom of this article, which will quote the entire article in your comment without you knowing it. Wading through the entire article in the comments is quite annoying! If you want to quote a portion of the article, click on the Quote button and delete everything that does not pertain to your comment. Otherwise, use the Quick Reply comment editor at the bottom of each page, which does not quote the original post. Thanks!

Scott Wilkinson
Editor, AVS Forum

Last edited by Scott Wilkinson; 08-11-2016 at 05:35 PM.
Scott Wilkinson is offline  
Sponsored Links
Advertisement
 
post #2 of 187 Old 08-10-2016, 05:09 PM
AVS Forum Special Member
 
Jive Turkey's Avatar
 
Join Date: Jun 2002
Location: good old USA
Posts: 1,940
Mentioned: 1 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 306 Post(s)
Liked: 175
We've all enjoyed Rob sharing his Theater with us on AVS. I haven't heard or seen a movie in it, but I'd bet I'd copy it if I ever had the resources!

I believe we need to start a Home Theater Hall of Fame!

See ya. Dave

"High Fidelity audio has been like a dog chasing his tail. High Fidelity in my marriage has been much more rewarding because she knows where I sleep."
Jive Turkey is offline  
post #3 of 187 Old 08-10-2016, 05:18 PM
AVS Forum Special Member
 
COACH2369's Avatar
 
Join Date: Nov 2004
Location: Knoxville, TN
Posts: 3,114
Mentioned: 36 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 958 Post(s)
Liked: 790
This was a no brainer....

Definitely going to put this on my bucket list of theaters to visit!

Bummer you couldn't have done a video for this one.
COACH2369 is offline  
 
post #4 of 187 Old 08-10-2016, 06:05 PM
Member
 
kendognz's Avatar
 
Join Date: Dec 2011
Posts: 37
Mentioned: 1 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 15 Post(s)
Liked: 28
Simply amazing!!
bahndit likes this.
kendognz is offline  
post #5 of 187 Old 08-10-2016, 06:12 PM
AVS Forum Special Member
 
steve1106's Avatar
 
Join Date: Feb 2014
Location: Northern, Va
Posts: 1,795
Mentioned: 12 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 662 Post(s)
Liked: 389
Wow. Wow. Wow. So that is 2.1:1 in 252.5" or 2.35:1 in 247.75".

Wow!

INTERJECTION
1.
(an exclamation of surprise, wonder, pleasure, or the like): Wow! Look at that!
VERB (USED WITH OBJECT)
2.
to gain an enthusiastic response from; thrill.
NOUN
3.
an extraordinary success: His act is a real wow.
4.
excitement, interest, great pleasure, or the like: a car that will add some wow to your life.

http://www.avsforum.com/forum/15-gen...eap-build.html
Epson HC3700/HC2000; Screen - 151.5" 16:9/TV or 143.5" 2.35:1/HT at a seating distance of 13/14 feet; Yamaha RXV675 for 7.4; Speakers - Infinity Primus; Subs - 3 Polk PSW10s, 1 BIC F12; Headphones - 4 JVC wireless; Sony 3D Blu-ray player/six pairs 3D glasses.
steve1106 is offline  
post #6 of 187 Old 08-10-2016, 07:06 PM
AVS Forum Special Member
 
Orbitron's Avatar
 
Join Date: Jul 2012
Posts: 1,120
Mentioned: 0 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 503 Post(s)
Liked: 389
I can relate to Rob's frustration: in my younger days when I used to go to the cinema, I always found myself looking upward to the projection booth (back when there was a person in the booth) and yelling - CAN YOU PUT IN A BRIGHTER BULB.
Orbitron is offline  
post #7 of 187 Old 08-10-2016, 08:05 PM
AVS Forum Special Member
 
darthray's Avatar
 
Join Date: Jul 2005
Location: Cold lake Alberta Canada
Posts: 3,986
Mentioned: 11 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 1179 Post(s)
Liked: 1082
This built is amazing


The size alone make it a personal Theater, no longer a Home Theater
And very nice equipment's to boot.



A very big congratulation to the owner of such a nice room.


Ray
darthray is offline  
post #8 of 187 Old 08-10-2016, 09:16 PM
AVS Forum Addicted Member
 
R Harkness's Avatar
 
Join Date: May 2001
Location: Toronto, Ontario, Canada
Posts: 14,374
Mentioned: 10 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 2127 Post(s)
Liked: 1844
What an extraordinary home cinema! Anyone watching a movie there is very fortunate.

I like this part especially:

Quote:
Originally Posted by Scott Wilkinson View Post

"Also, 4-way masking is extremely important to me. I wanted to be able to make 1.33 films larger than they would be in a constant-image-height [CIH] setup. You watch Close Encounters in 2.35 and Gone With the Wind in 1.33. In CIH theaters, to get the 1.33 aspect ratio, you would bring in the side masks, creating a smaller canvas. But with 4-way masking, I can move the top and bottom masks—as well as the sides—to create 1.33, but I end up with a larger canvas than I would have in a CIH configuration. I believe that Gone With the Wind was meant to have just as much impact as 2001, and the only way to achieve that is with 4-way masking.

"Another advantage of 4-way masking is that you can change the size of the screen depending on what kind of movie you're watching. In a commercial movie theater, you get to choose how close you want to be to the screen. But in a home theater, you don't have that flexibility. With 4-way masking, I can make the screen any size I want, based on the quality of the source material and the aspect ratio. For films that have huge vistas and slow-moving cameras, such as Lawrence of Arabia and 2001, I can watch on a 19' screen. For action films with a lot of hand-held work, such as the Bourne films, or titles with less-than-pristine picture quality, I can make the image smaller.
My sentiments exactly.

That's why I did the same thing when I designed my theater in 2008 - as large a screen as I could fit in my room, taller than a CIH screen, with 4 way masking so I could vary the image size for all the reasons stated above. Best decision I made in my whole design. Tonight my father in law came over with a DVD of an Opera performance he loves. The PQ was frankly poor and so I played it at a smaller size so it didn't look too blurry. But later tonight I watched Imax Space Station in 3D and opened my screen up to IMAX shape and a very large image, which was perfect for the immersion that title demands.
Nick V and ComradeBrehznev like this.
R Harkness is online now  
post #9 of 187 Old 08-10-2016, 09:29 PM
AVS Forum Special Member
 
OzHDHT's Avatar
 
Join Date: Jun 2003
Location: The Antipodes aka Oz
Posts: 2,830
Mentioned: 9 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 952 Post(s)
Liked: 532
Have seen quite a bit of Rob's build on the VW5000 thread over the last couple of months. Was extremely impressed from what he shared there, but this is incredible seeing it all laid out properly in Scott's article. Definitely by far THE best HT (if you can call it that), I've seen from both a build and equipment fit out stand point. He's definitely nailed all the gear in there, from choice of projector all the way through to subs. Certainly no one in this country has anything close to what Rob's got there - as they say bigger and better in the US of A!

A hearty congrats to Rob on building the theater of a lifetime!

Last edited by OzHDHT; 08-10-2016 at 10:19 PM.
OzHDHT is online now  
post #10 of 187 Old 08-10-2016, 10:17 PM
Senior Member
 
Rob Hahn's Avatar
 
Join Date: Nov 2004
Posts: 359
Mentioned: 4 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 162 Post(s)
Liked: 551
Quote:
Originally Posted by COACH2369 View Post
This was a no brainer....

Definitely going to put this on my bucket list of theaters to visit!

Bummer you couldn't have done a video for this one.
Actually - I captured the entire process using 7 Timelapse cameras over the course of the entire construction - I shot a frame every 5 seconds. That's not to say I have it all edited! It's so much footage I'm not sure I'll ever get to edit it properly (too many movies to watch, too many movies to catch up on). But I'd really like to do it. Maybe one day...

-Rob

Rob Hahn Theater build

Last edited by Rob Hahn; 08-11-2016 at 11:36 AM.
Rob Hahn is offline  
post #11 of 187 Old 08-10-2016, 10:27 PM
Senior Member
 
Rob Hahn's Avatar
 
Join Date: Nov 2004
Posts: 359
Mentioned: 4 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 162 Post(s)
Liked: 551
Quote:
Originally Posted by R Harkness View Post
That's why I did the same thing when I designed my theater in 2008 - as large a screen as I could fit in my room, taller than a CIH screen, with 4 way masking so I could vary the image size for all the reasons stated above. Best decision I made in my whole design. Tonight my father in law came over with a DVD of an Opera performance he loves. The PQ was frankly poor and so I played it at a smaller size so it didn't look too blurry. But later tonight I watched Imax Space Station in 3D and opened my screen up to IMAX shape and a very large image, which was perfect for the immersion that title demands.
Ah Rich - I've been lurking here on the forum for centuries and often silently praised your sometimes lone voice against the CIH-ers. When Art Sonnenborn came for a visit, I think he was so intrigued with the variable aspect concept that I believe he's now contemplating incorporating it into his wonderful theater. It's tricky cause you need height to do it, and most places just don't have an easy, cost effective way to achieve that.

For me, it was the _first_ thing I discussed with Geoff Franklin & Keith Yates - We must build a space that can incorporate 4-way masking!

-Rob

Rob Hahn Theater build

An Evening With Rob Hahn
Rob Hahn is offline  
post #12 of 187 Old 08-10-2016, 10:38 PM
Senior Member
 
Rob Hahn's Avatar
 
Join Date: Nov 2004
Posts: 359
Mentioned: 4 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 162 Post(s)
Liked: 551
Quote:
Originally Posted by OzHDHT View Post
Have seen quite a bit of Rob's build on the VW5000 thread over the last couple of months. Was extremely impressed from what he shared there, but this is incredible seeing it all laid out properly in Scott's article. Definitely by far THE best HT (if you can call it that), I've seen from both a build and equipment fit out stand point. He's definitely nailed all the gear in there, from choice of projector all the way through to subs. Certainly no one in this country has anything close to what Rob's got there - as they say bigger and better in the US of A!

A hearty congrats to Rob on building the theater of a lifetime!
Thank you so much! We're all pretty exhausted, but definitely exhilarated. My son-in-law had never seen "The Exorcist," so what a treat it was to show it to him on a large screen with really good sound. This is one of the main reasons I wanted to build this theater, to turn people on to movies they've never seen (or never seen properly). It's really thrilling!

(The guy that was the Director of Photography on "The Exorcist," Owen Roizman, ASC, I worked with for many years as his first assistant cameraman, then his Camera Operator, before I moved up to a DP - He told me so many great stories about making that film)...

Thanks for the kind words...

-Rob

Rob Hahn Theater build

An Evening With Rob Hahn
OzHDHT and Reddig like this.
Rob Hahn is offline  
post #13 of 187 Old 08-10-2016, 11:11 PM
AVS Forum Special Member
 
Reddig's Avatar
 
Join Date: Jun 2009
Location: Central U.S.
Posts: 2,232
Mentioned: 3 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 252 Post(s)
Liked: 521
This is hands down, no doubt, absolutely my favorite theater in AVS! It hits all of the checkmarks and then some. This is how it's done. Amazing Rob!
AudioJosh likes this.

JBL Pro Cinema-JTR subwoofers-Sony projection-Elite AT screen-Denon AVR-Oppo BD player-Acoustimac panels-SeatCraft HT seating
MANCHESTER UNITED!!
Reddig is offline  
post #14 of 187 Old 08-11-2016, 12:27 AM
Senior Member
 
AudyoVidyo's Avatar
 
Join Date: Mar 2014
Posts: 240
Mentioned: 1 Post(s)
Tagged: 1 Thread(s)
Quoted: 73 Post(s)
Liked: 112
Absolutely conclusively jaw dropping. Coming from the DIY crowd, I shudder to think how much that would have cost. But I get the sense that expense wasn't a constraint. Gotta love and respect that philosophy. Do it once, do it right. I love it.

I vote HT of the decade!
AudyoVidyo is offline  
post #15 of 187 Old 08-11-2016, 12:47 AM
AVS Forum Special Member
 
Defcon's Avatar
 
Join Date: Sep 2001
Posts: 2,453
Mentioned: 9 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 1194 Post(s)
Liked: 644
This might be the most amazing theater I've read about on AVS I think some videos of this in action need to be posted.

I wish one day to experience something like this.
Defcon is offline  
post #16 of 187 Old 08-11-2016, 01:47 AM
Member
 
aldiallo's Avatar
 
Join Date: Sep 2011
Posts: 163
Mentioned: 0 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 1 Post(s)
Liked: 18


Sorry but that was the first thing that came to my mind when I saw this setup! Holly Cow, that's what you can call an AMAZING setup. I wish I can one day listen to something like that!

Just asking but is there a setup diagram showing how is the gear interconnected?
aldiallo is offline  
post #17 of 187 Old 08-11-2016, 04:36 AM
AVS Forum Special Member
 
KidHorn's Avatar
 
Join Date: Nov 2003
Location: Derwood, Maryland
Posts: 4,838
Mentioned: 5 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 1492 Post(s)
Liked: 982
Awesome, but no cable box?
ComradeBrehznev likes this.
KidHorn is offline  
post #18 of 187 Old 08-11-2016, 04:42 AM
AVS Forum Special Member
 
MIkeDuke's Avatar
 
Join Date: Dec 2004
Location: eastern PA
Posts: 7,029
Mentioned: 3 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 543 Post(s)
Liked: 216
OK. It's 7:30 am EST and I am really at a loss for words here. This theater looks amazing. The amount of planning looks to have been staggering. The sheer size of the room look to be eminence. Your choice of equipment is second to none. The screen size, electronics and speakers are just amazing. I have heard about the KY subs but I never seen a system that actually used them. I mean, I don't know what else to say.
I literally can't type anymore. Except to say congrats on creating am amazing home theater.

It ain't easy being green.
My System
MIkeDuke is offline  
post #19 of 187 Old 08-11-2016, 04:58 AM
AVS Forum Special Member
 
Join Date: Sep 2015
Location: Europe, Croatia
Posts: 1,237
Mentioned: 3 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 720 Post(s)
Liked: 380
So, is that guy married and what do I have to do to become his wife?
oneeyeblind likes this.

Revel Ultima Salon 2, Revel M106, Revel C208, Yamaha P5000S, Denon X5200, Panasonic 65" VT50, SVS PC13-Ultra
Kef LS50, Parasound New Classic, Focusrite 2i2
donktard is offline  
post #20 of 187 Old 08-11-2016, 05:13 AM
AVS Forum Special Member
 
cdy2179's Avatar
 
Join Date: Dec 2005
Location: central Louisiana
Posts: 3,219
Mentioned: 31 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 792 Post(s)
Liked: 481
cdy2179 is offline  
post #21 of 187 Old 08-11-2016, 05:56 AM
AVS Forum Special Member
 
TMcG's Avatar
 
Join Date: Mar 2010
Location: Earth
Posts: 4,011
Mentioned: 62 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 1186 Post(s)
Liked: 1002
@Scott Wilkinson - If there was ever a theater to visit in-person and make one of those HTOM videos....this was it!!! I'm halfway tempted to pony up the airline ticket on your behalf to get you (and your video equipment) to Connecticut as soon as possible!!

This theater scratched itches I didn't even know I had. There aren't enough superlatives to describe the quality of this project in every aspect. Very worthy and well-deserved recognition!

Oh, and Rob....I'm available for adoption!
Reddig likes this.
TMcG is offline  
post #22 of 187 Old 08-11-2016, 06:17 AM
Newbie
 
rollin62's Avatar
 
Join Date: Sep 2010
Posts: 4
Mentioned: 0 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 1 Post(s)
Liked: 1
That is absolutely incredible!! Love all the attention to detail. Never would have thought of something like the backlighting of the speakers so they are visible through the fabric. The whole build is amazing!
oneeyeblind likes this.
rollin62 is offline  
post #23 of 187 Old 08-11-2016, 06:18 AM
Member
 
Alembicjeff's Avatar
 
Join Date: Oct 2007
Posts: 122
Mentioned: 0 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 22 Post(s)
Liked: 39
Hi Rob,


Math was never my strong suit, but are there really TWENTY TWO, TWENTY-FOUR INCH SUBWOOFERS in this incredible home theater?


I would really like to hear more about the bass performance, and what led you to your subwoofer choice. Gravity must have been AWESOME!


Jeff.
Rengozu likes this.

Subs: 10 x 18" LMS Ultra 5400 in 5 Funk Audio sealed custom cabinets; 5 x Sanway FP14000 amps.
Speakers: Definitive Technology BP7000SC Front; BPVX/P surrounds
Pre/Pro: Marantz 7703; Disc Player: OPPO UDP-203.
Front Amp: Emotiva XPA 2 Gen 2; Surround Amp: XPA 7.
Display: Vizio P65-C1
Alembicjeff is offline  
post #24 of 187 Old 08-11-2016, 07:02 AM
Advanced Member
 
Bigham16's Avatar
 
Join Date: Jul 2008
Location: Lewisville, TX
Posts: 799
Mentioned: 7 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 198 Post(s)
Liked: 142
alkdsjfl;aksf;laksdflj...Sorry, that was my jaw hitting the keyboard. Congrats on an amazing home/personal theater!!! Just amazing!!
Bigham16 is offline  
post #25 of 187 Old 08-11-2016, 07:22 AM
AVS Forum Special Member
 
BornSlippyZ's Avatar
 
Join Date: Jan 2010
Location: Minnesota!
Posts: 4,102
Mentioned: 6 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 1851 Post(s)
Liked: 1564
This is the definition of a Hyper Home Theater! A home theater that conveys every aspect of awe from all of those that look upon it!

Well done sir and congrats!
BornSlippyZ is offline  
post #26 of 187 Old 08-11-2016, 08:00 AM
Advanced Member
 
jdryyz's Avatar
 
Join Date: Sep 2005
Posts: 669
Mentioned: 0 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 36 Post(s)
Liked: 15
This isn't a home theater, it is an actual cinema.

Charge admission?
jdryyz is offline  
post #27 of 187 Old 08-11-2016, 08:43 AM
Senior Member
 
DDailey's Avatar
 
Join Date: Sep 2004
Posts: 242
Mentioned: 1 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 138 Post(s)
Liked: 129
"Another motivation was to build a theater that would properly showcase films in the manner they were meant to be seen.

Shhsssss - one can lose their "secret" AVS card by mentioning such a thing!
DDailey is offline  
post #28 of 187 Old 08-11-2016, 08:56 AM
Advanced Member
 
DrewB's Avatar
 
Join Date: May 2002
Location: Minnesota
Posts: 975
Mentioned: 4 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 123 Post(s)
Liked: 111
This ain't no home theater...this is a movie theater! Incredible!
DrewB is offline  
post #29 of 187 Old 08-11-2016, 09:29 AM
Member
 
DigiWega's Avatar
 
Join Date: Feb 2003
Posts: 44
Mentioned: 0 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 24 Post(s)
Liked: 30
Quote:
Originally Posted by DrewB View Post
This ain't no home theater...this is a movie theater! Incredible!
I'm going to second that. Simply amazing!
DigiWega is offline  
post #30 of 187 Old 08-11-2016, 09:31 AM
AVS Forum Special Member
 
Orbitron's Avatar
 
Join Date: Jul 2012
Posts: 1,120
Mentioned: 0 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 503 Post(s)
Liked: 389
Quote:
Originally Posted by DDailey View Post
"Another motivation was to build a theater that would properly showcase films in the manner they were meant to be seen.

Shhsssss - one can lose their "secret" AVS card by mentioning such a thing!
If my local cinema was as nice as Rob's I'd still venture out from time to time.
Orbitron is offline  
Sponsored Links
Advertisement
 
Reply Community News & Polls

Tags
Home Theater Of The Month

Thread Tools
Show Printable Version Show Printable Version
Email this Page Email this Page


Forum Jump: 

Posting Rules  
You may not post new threads
You may not post replies
You may not post attachments
You may not edit your posts

BB code is On
Smilies are On
[IMG] code is On
HTML code is Off
Trackbacks are Off
Pingbacks are Off
Refbacks are Off