Viewing Review: The Denon AVR-5700. Probably one of the best sub $3000 A/V receivers ever! - AVS Forum
The Denon AVR-5700. Probably one of the best sub $3000 A/V receivers ever! Edit
by orrubin Combined Rating: 4.5
The Denon AVR-5700. Probably one of the best sub $3000 A/V receivers ever, and for its time, was one of the most advanced receivers created.

I still use a Denon AVR-5700, one of the first A/V...
Pros Cons
  • Better sound for the dollar, multiple decode modes, input memory, multiple rear channel configurations
  • No HDMI (it is old!)
The Denon AVR-5700. Probably one of the best sub $3000 A/V receivers ever, and for its time, was one of the most advanced receivers created.

I still use a Denon AVR-5700, one of the first A/V components that combined Dobly Digital with Lucasfilm's TXH 5.1 surround technology. This receiver outputs up to 140 watts per channel in a 5.1+ THX-Ultra certified five channel power amp system. The receiver supports 2 separate surround channel speakers for location dependent side or back surround (selectable) depending on the source. It came packed with more features than most will use. One of the first A/V receivers to include all decoding for DTS, Dolby Digital, Dolby Pro Logic, and THX-EX surround with THX post processing. And the signal remains digital throughout the decoding and enhancing process.

Also included is a large collection of DSP generated surround effects for stereo and mono sources like matrix surround, virtual dolby surround, as well as "5-channel stereo", stereo, direct, and mono modes. It also includes an excellent AM/FM receiver. Status is displayed on a fluorescent front panel dimmable display and LED selection indicators.

User settable delays and volumes on all 5 channels also makes custom room setups a snap. Source memory, basically remembering all the settings of each of the video or audio inputs makes use easy as well. No more needing to remember what surround mode, volume levels, or enhancements you selected each time you change the input.

While this is a 5.1 amp, it was designed with 7.1 in mind, featuring 8 channel inputs for the 7.1 format, and an 8 channel pre-amp output , allowing an upgrade path to 7.1 by the addition of an external amp.

Hook-up was a snap in the pre-HDMI days, with inputs and outputs for composite, component, and S-Video separated on the back by input and type. Control was just as easy, with a few easy to use controls on the front panel, with the more advanced and less used controls hidden behind a swing down door. Anything you can do from the front panel you can more easily control from the reasonably sized remote.

Lacking HDMI inputs (given the date of release) this amp had more then enough audio and video inputs for its day to handle most any system, with component, composite and S-Video inputs. It provides component, composite, and S-Video switching, with on-screen menus routed to the currently active output. Separate display and monitor video out, and a separate controlled bus for independent recording output or dubbing between devices, separate from the main displayed content.

Not only does this receiver offer exceptional reproduction of 5.1 digital surround information, the use of high-end audio DACs means exceptional Dolby ProLogic decoding as well The use of 24-bit. 96-kHZ DACs on all six channels with "Denon's 24-bit Alpha processing" for the main left and right channels made for one of the best A/V receivers of the time. It still stands up or beats most A/V receivers even today.

Even in today's HDMI world, I have coupled this receiver with a DVDO iScan VP50 for automatic HDMI and video switching, and there are still very few A/V receivers that match its sound quality, feature set, THX certification, or video clarity, especialy for the price.

Dimensions Height-7.13 in, Width-17.09 in., Weight-47.4 lb.
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orrubin 11-04-2013, 02:41 PM

I should also mention, one of my favorite features was the channel display map. There is a green LED "link" LED when a digital signal is present. 5 red LEDs indicate which channels are "active" in the digital signal. When a digital stereo signal is presented, you get the green LED and two red LEDs for front left and right. When a 5.1 signal is detected, all 6 LEDs light up. made knowing which input type and channels were being sent to the receiver.

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