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Posts by Selden Ball

According to their owner's manuals, both the E300 and the 1504 have exactly the same version of Audyssey equalization (MultEQ) and the same additional Audyssey features (DynamicEQ & DynamicVolume). The "metal" grades are just Denon marketing terms. Both receivers provide network connectivity. Their manuals are available for downloading from the Denon and Maratntz Web sites. The Marantz receiver adds an M=X port, a 5th HDMI input, a 3rd pair of analog inputs, and front L&R...
When running in either of the Direct modes, both Audyssey and bass management are disabled. However, an Audyssey calibration applies to the receiver's Stereo setting just as well as it does to its multichannel modes. Be sure to run a full calibration after you've upgraded your speakers. You'll have to determine from your own listening tests if it provides an improvement over Direct when listening to stereo audio. Part of that will depend on the quality of your subwoofer....
In audio systems which include subwoofers, all modern multichannel receivers and pre/pros send the LFE input channel only to the subwoofer output channel. They also include bass management, which redirects low frequencies below a specified crossover frequency from the various speaker channels to the subwoofer channel. Many subwoofers include their own bass management options, so if yours does, recabling your front speakers to it might be one way to reduce the problem...
The LPF (Low Pass Filter) for the LFE (Low Frequency Effects channel) normally should be left at 120Hz. However, you might get better audio with a lower setting. The LFE channel is the .1 channel of movie soundtracks and is designed to contain frequencies up to 120Hz. It's not directly related to the subwoofer output channel. If you set that LPF below 120Hz, you'll be attenuating some of the LFE's higher frequencies. However, the filter isn't a "brick wall", so setting...
AVRs with Audyssey do allow you to increase the "trim" levels for any of the speaker channels, including the subwoofer channel. It's better to do it in the receiver than with the subwoofer's volume control since it's much more reproducible. Doing so does not affect Audyssey's calibration. How much you increase it is entirely up to you. However, bear in mind that a 3dB increase doubles the power required, so a really big increase probably wouldn't be a good idea.
And to call your cable company for a replacement!
Great! Thanks for letting us know.
blazar, Have you measured any difference in the audio when "Pure" is enabled? Supposedly it's there to decrease crosstalk from video to audio digital and analog circuits, which theoretically would be present regardless of the quality of the DAC design. All wires and circuit-board traces act as antennas, both broadcasting and receiving electromagnetic signals. The fewer circuits are on, the less noise is being broadcast, and thus the less is there to be picked up. I...
When you get a musician's boom mic stand, make sure you get an adapter for the microphone: the mics recommended for use with REW have the same threads as are used by cameras, as does the Radio Shack sound level meter. They aren't the same as the threads in musicians' microphones. Some stands come with an adapter, some don't. Calibrating with the subwoofer's EQ first does let the subwoofer's EQ do most of the work, leaving that much less for Audyssey to do, so that (in...
One solution would be to get a mason to dig out some of the mortar and run cables in that, and then into the wall. That'll be expensive though. Another would be to put the TV somewhere else, and put some kind of cheap artwork in the hole. (Cheap because smoke + UV from the windows will damage it.) Your neck will thank you. Looking up at a TV that's so high is likely to to cause muscle fatigue.
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