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Posts by xrox

IIRC the dark adaptation and pupil response are triggered by average brightness reaching your retina. I suspect that in a pitch black room dark adaptation will occur regardless of screen content as the average brightness reaching your retina is low regardless. Your experiment of getting up to go to the bathroom is poor IMO as the average brightness is very high.I've tested this a long time ago with my 141FD and I can't quite remember the overall response. I'll have to do...
Yes it is possible, but not practical. A PDP needs time to compile an image. If the refresh rate is too high (eg 120Hz or more) the time available is too short and thus the PDP will be too dim and have less subfields. If the refresh rate is too low (eg 48Hz or less) there will be severe flicker.In limiting the subfield time you are also limiting the brightness. It is a tradeoff.
I haven't read this thread yet so I may repeat some points.All displays that generate light within a subpixel will have an ABL. This includes CRT, Plasma, OLED, SED, FED....etcThis is because they are all power-on-demand devices. The brighter the display the more power it needs. LCD works differently in that light intensity is constant and thus power is constant as well. Intesity is controlled only by liquid crystal orientation.The purpose of the ABL in power-on-demand...
What I think is causing confusion is that PDP does not fit well into your metaphor.The stubborn burnt in images we see in a PDP are caused by sputtering of magnesium oxide. This is a phenomenon that affects adjacent cells as well as the primary cell. In a PDP the pixels are open to each other and when one cell is discharging it affects the cells next to it by supplying charged particles and sputtered materials. This is why even stubborn IR is somewhat reversible in...
Two or more frames are analyzed for motion and processed accordingly before being displayed. This will of course take up some time.Limiting the entire frame to only 1 subfield would limit the grayscale capability dramatically as all gray levels would be created by halftoning using one subfield weight.The only situation where subfield weights have to change is when the panel refresh rate changes. This is becuase the time available for generating subfields changes.
Recently I've been having trouble interpreting posts so it is probably me. From the original statements about pounding consecutive images vs excitation....etc I am confused how they are different types of Burn In. I fail to see the difference.
IIUC I would then disagree. Interspersing random material cannot protect you from uneven phosphor aging in a PDP. It only protects against non-phosphor related image retention like MgO sputtering and residual charge.OLED is such a widely variable technology. There are papers discussing mura and IR in OLED due to the backplane effects but who knows if it applies across the board or only to certain backplane technologies.
In AVS terminology your type 1 would be IR and type 2 would be burn-in. As I described above, the change in charge transport properties with usage may produce IR on OLED and the quick EL material aging may produce burn-in so they may have both. Add to that the possibility of mura.
Just read this discussion on OLED IR and burn-in. As you know any display that generates light inside individual pixels will be prone to burn-in issues (CRT,PDP,SED,FED, OLED...etc). And the severity of the burn-in problem can be correlated with the rated lifetime of the set. Since the lifetime of OLED is relatively low compared to PDP I would say that the burn-in problem would be worse than PDP. However, PDP was unique that it had a severe type of IR caused by MgO...
This response tells me you are not understanding PDP operation or that paper you cited. It sounds like you are confusing interpolated frames and interpolated subfields.That paper is describing dynamic false contours which are incorrect gray levels percieved by our eyes integrating non-contiguous subfields. This can be fixed by anticipating the contour effect and rearranging the subfields to compensate.Another way to eliminate this issue is to use contiguous subfields...
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